Writings and essays about flamenco

“Rito y Geografía del Flamenco” — Notes on the 1996 first commercial release

The following describes the great flamenco documentary series “Rito y Geografía de Flamenco” when most of the films were released in a commercial videocassette version by Alga Editores in Spain in 1996. It was a poor version — the images were often fuzzy, and an accompanying hardcover book used many of those images with weak text. A quarter of the original 100 programs were not included. A later release on DVD’s was far superior, with exellent images and excellent booklets of additional commentary by the key man on the project, José María Velásquez and English subtitles — though that version, too, omitted a batch of programs, most relatively weak but some quite good. (Five years earlier, I had managed to rescue and purchase the first copies of these and other films from the series; I had hoped this first commercial version from Alga would add valuable documentation and sharper images, but no such luck.

Here’s that earlier description, headlined “A Collection of Incunables” — while it logically means “indispensables” or somesuch, I can’t find a fitting translation — maybe the word exists in English as well, but I’ve never heard it:

“A collection of ‘incunables’ in images that depict unforgettable scenes of flamenco song, showing the greatest artists of the past and the present. 26 videocassettes (VHS) with more than 38 hours of material and a sumptuous book of 272 pages containing more than 100 photographs of the people and places appearing in the series, with text by eminent present-day flamencologists, historians, anthropologists and musicians.

Enjoy the experience of these unrepeatable images of the great masters, many of them now gone, both professional and aficionados, who knew how to maintain the purest essences of flamenco cante: See Antonio Mairena, Caracol, Beni de Cadiz, Pericon de Cadiz, Pepe de la Matrona, Joselero de Moron, El Gallina (Rafael Romero), El Perrate, La Piriñaca, El Borrico, Pepe Marchena, Camarón, etc.

“Rito y Geografia del Cante” was created between March of 1971 and October of 1973. 100 programs were made and shown. The team visited 28 locales in Andalucia, Salamanca, Barcelona, Extremadura, Toledo, Murcia and Portugal. They filmed 186 singers, 13 folklore groups, 47 guitarists, 313 palmeros (supporting hand-clappers), dancers and aficionados. There are 117 interviews and get-togethers with flamencologists, musicians, historians, anthropologists and noted aficionados. We are pleased to present the fruit of this search and investigation.”

This was followed by two brief descriptive essays which I’m translating (from a crummy fax, so my general ignorance is occasionally compounded by illegibility):

1. “Criteria for this Edition of Rito y Geografia del Cante.”

“Today, 25 years after the initial broadcasts by Television Espanola of the ‘Rito y Geografia del Cante’ series, some things remain the same in the world of flamenco while others have changed. The best of the new developments is perhaps the wide promulgation of flamenco — a notion touched upon in the programs, and now confirmed to an astonishing degree. The worst, at least from the orthodox point of view, and from the standpoint of the splendid “oldness” (vejez) that distinguishes the series, may be certain present-day mixings and fusions (mestizajes) that don’t make much sense.

Since the films were made, we have seen the disappearance of Camarón, who in the series represented a new and unorthodox approach to the cante; and we’ve seen Enrique Morente — who is asked where he thinks the modernizing movement might take flamenco — do a recent recording of poems by Leonard Cohen while joined by a rock group, without abandoning flamenco. José Menese, another young renovationist of that earlier time, has remained faithful to the roots (“Firme me mantengo” — “I stand firm”, as one of his songs says), and it is through him that we know the political verses of his mentor José Moreno Galván, with their strong social content, which were so avidly listened to during Spain’s transition to democracy.

This documentary series, despite the subsequent appearance of new interpreters and the loss of a large part of those who are shown, or despite the evolution of some of these depicted artists to enter the realm of “new flamenco”, has not aged a bit. On the contrary, like fine wine, it has turned into something special, almost venerable — a relic, an “incunable” (priceless document? Unique object? The word “incunabula” refers to manuscripts created before the age of moveable type…)

Nonetheless, in the intervening time, some of the interpreters originally included, either because they were valued more highly than warranted or because they played a particular role in the original criteria for selection, have been eliminated, since their art would not say very much to a young aficionado today. Those eliminated are not mythical singers of the past, nor have they confirmed themselves as myths of today as did Morente, Camarón or Menese. Nor are they fundamental representatives of a particular geographic or family school of flamenco. Their inclusion would only have expanded this edition unneccessarily, and perhaps disoriented the new aficionado.

2. “A Collection of ‘Incunables’”

“Rito y Geografia del Cante”, broadcast by TVE between 1971 and 1973, is considered by all specialists, and is recognized in the histories of flamenco, as the finest program ever produced for television. In a run covering approximately two years, under the direction of Mario Gómez and with the collaboration and evaluative judgments of the most prestigious flamencologists, the weekly series travelled all of flamenco territory, including the very guts of Andalucia where, over the years, this art — local and universal at the same time — was developed.

The series offered testimony from old singers, many of them anonymous, others celebrated. It was a true blessing, because it was launched at a time when the great flamenco neighborhoods or breeding areas (Triana, Cadiz, Jerez and its Barrio de Santiago) were starting to lose their traditional and Gypsy ways of life due to the changes Spain had started to see in the 1960′s, and due to the influence of new communcations media, changing customs, etc. These documentaries, then, arrived in time to miraculously save the memory of a life already in large part irrevocably lost.

The filming, always guided by intelligent curiosity and by the commentary of José María Velásquez, or through the introduction of expert specialists, traversed all the last locales in which flamenco was being “made”: taverns, family homes, colmaos, and ventas. And it collected the final artistic testimonies of many singers who would be dead shortly afterward — in some cases, even before their particular programs were aired. That was the case with Juan Talega and Manolo Caracol, among others.

But today, 25 years after their broadcast, a large number of those protagonists are no longer with us. We can no longer capture the image of Tia Anica La Piriñaca, El Beni de Cadiz, Diego el del Gastor, Antonio Piñana (padre), Eleuterio — to name just some of those who are gone, but leave their myths behind, and whose images return to us now in these videos, as they sing or speak of their cante.

Thus it is possible today to see Antonio Mairena dancing por bulerias; or Tía Anica giving her advice to some youngsters (who were none other than Manuel Sordera and “that ‘Camirón’, or whatever he’s called…”); or to see Juan Talega in a fight to the death with the form called the toná, perhaps the last one he would sing in his lifetime; or Tomás Torre, speaking about his father Manuel; or Fernanda and Bernarda de Utrera in a fiesta at home, or praying to the Virgin; or the Perrates, uncle and mother of Juan El Lebrijano.

And, also, a young and “parlanchin” (?) Camarón de la Isla; young José Menese in his home town of La Puebla de Cazalla or getting his professional start in Madrid; and a five-year-old La Macanita, singing and dancing for Paula; and Remedios Amaya, barely an adolescent at the time. And, too, monographic (single-topic) episodes dedicated to major thematic issues, such as the relation of Falla and Lorca to flamenco; or the festivales; or women in the realm of cante; or the guitar; or the role of the Gypsies within the art; etc.

With this series, you are presented with a true collection of “incunables” — a true history of images of the old and pure (rancia) mystery of flamenco. The films reveal a history that can never be repeated, and that today is lost forever.

Paco González
Editor

End of material on the series.

I think the general descriptions are pretty good, and while I’d argue about the omission of any material, I think the Alga folks made a defensible choice — some of the omitted programs were very weak, and seemed like filler.

(As for the alleged artist called Eleuterio — never heard of the guy, and would bet he never existed, at least by that name.)

Brook Zern

March 1, 2017   No Comments

Flamenco Tape Recordings from the Collection of Brook Zern

Flamenco Tape Recordings from the Collection of Brook Zern, recorded by various aficionados

Note: These recordings were collected over many decades from many sources, usually identified here. They are not yet available for widespread listening, but it seems reasonable to include this information for future identification.

Key to BZ Flamenco tapes:

Prefixes:

S = Live Stage [Theater] Performance

SD = Stage Performance, featuring Dancer(s)
SG = Stage Performance, featuring Guitarist(s)
SS = Stage Performance, featuring Singer(s)

J = Live Juerga Performance (private flamenco event; usually features Singers and Guitarists, with occasional Dancers)

Guitarists:

DdG = Diego del Gastor
JdG = Juanito del Gastor
DdM = Dieguito de Moron [Dieguito del Gastor]
PdG = Paco del Gastor
CC = Chris Carnes
DS = David Serva

Singers:

J = Joselero de Moron
FdU = Fernanda de Utrera
BdU = Bernarda de Utrera
JT = Juan Talega
MC = Moreen Carnes [Moreen Silver, Maria la Marrurra]
Fo = Fernandillo de Moron
Mo = Manolito de la Maria

G = Guitar Solo

F = Live Festival Performance (public flamenco events, called Festivales in Spain, often outdoors; usually features Singers and Guitarists; may also feature Dancers)

R = Recordings from Commercially-released sources

RD = Commercial Recording, featuring Dancer(s)
RG = Commercial Recording, featuring Guitarist(s)
RS = Commercial Recording, featuring Singer

78 = Originally recorded on 78 rpm record

B = Broadcast (usually a recording of a radio broadcast by a Spanish station; these usually feature Singers, occasionally feature Guitarists, rarely feature Dancers. They may combine commercial recordings with recordings of Festivales. Tapes include some broadcasts done on Canadian radio by Danny Estulin.

L = Lesson (guitar lesson) [Note: In many cases, tapes denoted as Lesson to BZ may also involve BZ teaching material to the other guitarist]

I = Instructional (includes tapes made by U.S. aficionado Paco Sevilla as “The Living Flamenco Anthology)

G = Guitarists, recorded privately – not on stage or in fiesta or juerga situations

Suffixes:

US = Performance in U.S.A.
Sp = Performance in Spain
Fr = Performance in France
GB = Performance in Great Britain

(CC) = Originally recorded by Chris Carnes, obtained from various sources
(BZ) = Originally recorded by Brook Zern
(TB) = Originally recorded by Chris Carnes, obtained from Ted Bakewell
(GB) = Originally recorded by Chris Carnes, obtained from George and Madeline Berger
(DS) = Obtained from David Serva
(JK) = Obtained from Jay Kantor
(FV) = Obtained from Francisco Vallecillo

Following these prefixes and suffixes, tapes are numbered in arbitrary order

J__ (TB)

[NOTE: THIS FIRST SECTION LISTS TAPES RECEIVED FROM TED BAKEWELL, MOST OR ALL OF WHICH WERE ORIGINALLY RECORDED BY CHRIS CARNES. THERE WERE 36 TAPES WHICH WERE NUMBERED, THOUGH SOME OF THEM MAY NEVER HAVE BEEN RECEIVED. THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL TAPES THAT WERE NOT NUMBERED. ONLY A FEW OF THE TAPES WERE ON HAND FOR THIS COMPILATION, BUT THE REST SHOULD BE AVAILABLE SOON – SEE THE LISTING AT THE END FOR A DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THESE TED BAKEWELL TAPES.]

J1 (TB)

???

J2 (TB)

???

J3 (TB)

???

J4 (TB)

Easter Sunday – J, Fo, DdG: Bul E, J; Bul, MC; Rumba (G); Bul (G); Danza Mora (G); Sol; Bul E, J; Sig (G); Sol (J); / Fand (G); Gran (G); Sol (G); Fand (G); Sol (G); Bul E (G); Bul A, Fo; Fand, J; Al E, J; Bul A, Fo; Tangos, F; Al E (G); Tarantas (G)

J5 (TB)

???

J6 (TB)

???

J7 (TB)

???

J8 (TB)

???

J9 (TB)

Fiesta at Arnie’s / Club Mercantil – Bul in A, Fo; Bul in A, Mo; Bul in A, La Fernandillo [?]; Bul in E, Mo; Sol, Mo; Bul in A, Mo; Bul in A, FdeU; Sol (G), Bul in A, FdeU

Diego and Joselero, Aug. 1972 – Sol, J; Bul in E, J; Sol, J; Garrotin, J; Bul in A, J; Tango in Am, J; Bul in A, _____; Bul in A, Amparo w/PdG; Bul, Fo y Pepe Rios w/_____

J10 (TB)

???

J11 (TB)

???

J12 (TB)

???

J13 (TB)

???

J15 (TB)

???

J15 (TB)

Barrio de Santa Cruz – Diego’s guitar lessons to Chris Carnes – Sol, CC; Gran (lesson); Al E, Al C, Bul E, Sol E, Sig, Sol A, Sig, Sol, Bul, J, CC; Sol J, CC; / Sol, CC; Sig M. Mairena “Barrio de Santa Cruz”; Bul A, FdeU, Bul A, Fde U; Bul A (G), Bul E, Perrate; Sol E, Perrate; Bul A, FdeU

J16 (TB)

???

J17 (TB)

???

J18 (TB)

???

J19 (TB)

???

J20 (TB)

???

J21 (TB)

???

J22 (TB)

Diego Drunk at David’s (I) – Sig (G); Bul (G) + Bul, MC; Sig (G); Bul A, MC; Bul A (G); Sol A (G); / (II) Sol A (G); Sig (G); Bul A, MC; Sig, MC; Sig (G); Bul, MC; Bul – Alborea, J; Sol (G); Bul A (G); Bul, J; Sol E (G); Gran (G)

J23 (TB)

???

J24 (TB)

???

J25 (TB)

???

JJ26 (TB)

???

J27 (TB)

???

J28 (TB)

???

J29 (TB)

???

J30 (TB)

Agustin Rios, Pepe Torres, Ansonini, Joselero, Dieguito – Sig, Pepe Torres; Tangos E, J; Sig, Pepe Torres; Bul A (G); Bul E, J; Tangos E, J; / Tangos E, J (cont’d); Bul A, AR, [Pepe] Suarez; Bul A, AR, Ansonini; Tangos E, AR, Ansonini; Bul A, DdM

J31 (TB)

???

J32 (TB)

???

J33 (TB)

???

J34 (TB)

???

J35 (TB)

Dieguito (Diego de Moron, Dieguito del Gastor) – [then] Diego, Joselero, Andorrano, April or May, 1973 – Bul (G), Sig (G) / Bul A (G); Bul E, J; Sol E, J; Bul E (G); Bul A, Andorrano

J36 (TB)

???

J1

Moron – Juerga

(cont’d)

J2

[Tara tape]: Morning after Gazpacho, 1966 – Fernanda, Diego, Talega, Perrate

(cont’d)

J3

[Tara tape]: Diego, Talega, Fernando, Diego and Moreen (Sig)

(blank)[?]

J4 (+L)

[Tara tape]: Loring – Afternoon at Chris’s House, Lesson 5/6/67, Lesson Terry Toney

5/12/67, Diego, Juan Talega, Joselero, Fernando, Aurelio, Enrique Mendez

J5

[Tara tape]: Solo Diego

(cont’d)[?]

J6

[Tara Tape]

Diego del Gastor – 4 – Side 2 – cont’d

(cont’d)

J7

Moron – Cinta 1 – _____

(cont’d)

J8

Fernanda de Utrera y Bernarda de Utrera – en directo – [sold privately] – at Pena el Taranto in Almeria, Oct. 27, 1990 – Fernanda w/Tomatito: Bul “De ti yo no me acuerdo”, Fand “Eran siete cubiertas de plata”, Tientos “To aquel que tiene fatigas”, Bul por Sol “Por el hablar de la gente”

At Pena Flamenca de Jaen, homage to La Fernanda y La Bernarda, 1990 – Bernarda de Utrera w/Manuel de Palma: Bul “Se fue con el viento”; Fernanda de Utrera w/Manue de Palma: Sol “Yo solita a tu favor”; Bernarda de Utrera y Fernanda de Utrera: Cantinas del Pinini: “Se han enreao”; Bernarda de Utrera, Fernanda de Utrera, Ines y Luis: Bul “Yo nunca te he dicho na”

J9

From Mac King tape – Fiesta at Finca Espartero – June 19, 1971 – Juanito, Agustin, Andorran, Bolero, Gitanito… – Bul (Juanito); Bul (Andorrano); Fand (Bolero); Guajira (Bolero)

(cont’) – Fand (Bolero) – Then – Fiesta at Finca Espartero, June 17, 1971 – Diego, Luis Torres “Joselero”, Andorrano – Taranto (Joselero), Mal (Joselero), Fand (Joselero, Andorrano); Al in C (Diego, guitar)…

J10

Lionni – Moron – “Juerga – Bullerias”

“Juerga – Various”

J11

Lionni – Moron – “Juerga – Brook”

(cont’d)

J12

Juan Talega, Pepe Flores

Paco del Gastor, Manolito, Diego one month after death of his mother

J13

Diego – Joselero, Andorrano

Diego – Juan Talega, Enrique Mendez, Diego and Paco jamming

J14

From V. Granados – Diego, etc. – Sig, Sol, Bul (con Fernanda?)

(cont’d) – Diego – Bul, Sol (con Joselero) – La Nina de Los Peines, at Festival – Diego – Sol (con Juan Talega), Sol (con Juan Talega), Taranta

J15

From V. Granados, 1987 – Guitars: Diego and Paco del Gastor – Bul (G); Bul, Ansonini; Sig, PdG (G); Sol, Perrate; Bul, Rosalia de Triana; Bul, Andorrano

(cont’d) — Bul, Rosalia de Triana; Bul, Sol, Perrate; Sol, Rosalia de Triana; Bul, Andorrano; Bul, Rosalia de Triana; Bul, Perrate w/DdG and PdG; Sol, Perrate w/DdG; Bul (Rosalia w/DdG)

J16

Dieguito – 1975-1980 – Jesus, Ansonini

(cont’d)

J17

Pena Garbanzo [Jerez] – cantaor w/Antonio Jero – May 22, 1993

(cont’d) – Then – Radio in Jerez – June 8, 1993

J18

Diego, La Fernanda, etc. [“An Evening With…”]

_____ (club – Mal, Fand de H.)

J19 (JK) (+F)

JK1 (from big tape) – cont’d – Martinetes at Festival – Solos by Diego and Paco

Solos by Diego and Paco

J20

[From open reel?] – Sol, J w/DdG; Sol, Manolito de la Maria w/Ddg; Sol, Manolito de la Maria w/DdG; / Sol, Manolito de la Maria w/DdG (cont’d); Sig, J w/DdG; Bul, Manolito de la Maria w/DdG; Sol, DdG (G); Fand (J w/DdG); Sol, Manolito de la Maria w/Eduardo de la Malena; Bul, Manolito de la Maria w/Eduardo de la Malena

J21

Moron – Diego, Fernanda, Perrate

Moron – Diego, Paco del Gastor, Fernanda, Perrate

J22

Cinta 1 – Moron – From _____ – _____

(cont’d)

J23

Moron – Loring’s tape – May 9, 1967 – Diego, Joselero, Agustin, Bernabe

(cont’d)[?]

J24

Rich and Fra – Denis [?] – Richard and Frauke –

(cont’d) – Juerga at ___ – Nov. 1996

J25

[Scotch] 3 – Juerga May 12, 1967 – Diego, Talegas, Joselero, Fernando [Fernandillo de Moron ?]

(cont’d)

J26

Fiesta on 14th Street – Jan. 24, 1984 – [after Funi show] – Sabicas, Miguel “El Funi”, Diego Vargas, David Serva, (Chano Lobato) [?]

(cont’d) – Serva, Funi, Vargas – Sabicas

J27 (BZ)

At George Hollenberg’s house in Weston, Connecticut: Diego Camacho “El Boqueron” w/Juan Habichuela: Sol, Mal – Brook Zern, guitar: Sol, Bul

(blank)[?]

J28

Paco del Gastor – From Evan Harrar – Then old cante

(cont’d) – Paco del Gastor

J29

Tara tape – Side 1 – May 9, 1967 – Diego, Luis, Agustin, Bernabe – Then – May 6,1967 – Diego, Papas Fritas

(cont’d)

J30

[Ampex 370] – Diego’s House, Dec. 1970 – Diego and Joselero

Diego and Luis [Joselero], (2/3 this side only); (then Diego and Luis from other tape, badly recorded)

J31

Diego, Bacan, etc. – From David Serva – _____

(cont’d)

J32

Abuela, Bastian, Miguel

(cont’d)

J33

Tape from Evan Harrar – Paco del Gastor – _____

(cont’d)

J34

Agustin Rios – Moron, 1972 – Rondena por Bul – Then – Mill Valley, California, 1980 – Ansonini w/Agustin Rios [?] – Then – _____

[non-flamenco – Peter Ustinov: Three Depressing Love Songs; Mozart Opera]

J35

Juerga – Diego, Manolito, Fernanda, etc. – From tapes (w/Bob – small open reel tapes)

Evan Harrar 3 [Lesson to BZ][?]

J36

Utrera – Fiesta – 1991 – From Jay

(cont’d)[?]

J37

Juerga 2000 – San Diego, California – Fin de verano fiesta – Steve Kahn and others – Sol (long solo); Bul (accompanying Cristo Cortes, then Richard Black (5 frets higher than normal)

(cont’d) Sig – first with Basilio, then with Cristo Cortes; Bul – first with Basilio, then Nina Menendez; Then – playing informally on Hap Caldwell’s guitar, giving a sort of lesson or demo – Then – Sol in A – various ideas – very fast – these recordings were made by Luke Ashbury during informal fiest and gatherings at Basilio and Pilar’s “Fin de Verano Fiesta” in San Diego, California over Labor Day Weekend, 2000

J38

Moron – Juerga – recorded from open reel tape (Mac King, 1971?) Diego, Joselero, etc. – NYC family noise in background

Moron – Juerga – 1973 [after death of Diego] – Bul – Juanito del Gastor plays and accompanies himself – to about 1/2 of tape — Then – recorded from open reel tape (resuming same taping from other side?) – Moron – juerga – Sig in E – Joselero w/Diego – NYC family noise in background – to about 2/3 of tape — Then – non flamenco – recording of family in Scarsdale including Evelyn Menkin Zern – possibly 1975

J39 (BZ) (+RG)

At Feria de Sevilla – in a caseta – 1988 – poor recording — La Paquera: Tango; Maria Solea [?]: Bul; Maria La Burra [?]: Bul; _____: Bul – 3/4 of tape – Then – Ramon Montoya – end of his recording – Sig, Bul [Sol in A], Fand de H.

Nino Ricardo – LP — _____ — Serrana [Sig in E], Sol in A, Al in E, Tarantas, Bul, Mal, Zapateado, Sig, Sol, Gran, Tientos, Fand de H., [Al in E]

J40

Homenaje a Diego – Joselero y Dieguito [commercial recording ?]

“Mellizo” – Francisco Amaya Flores, older brother of Diego del Gastor, c. 1959

J53 (GB)

[red BASF] C – Dieguito [Diego de Moron] [Dieguito del Gastor] – Cloverdale concert, Spring, 1973 – Diego, Manolito, Joselero, Amparo, Dieguito, Paco de los Caramelos (Sig), ‘65 [?]

_____

J55 (GB)

[red BASF] E – Diego, National Geographic, May 2, 1973; Diego and Fernanda, July 1, 1973; Diego and Manolito, 1966; Diego, Fernanda, Joselero and Ansonini, 1970 [?]; speed off at end / Diego

J58 (GB)

[red BASF] H – Diego and Joselero, Dec. 1970 – D and Ansonini; D and Tanguadillo / Diego solo; Joselero TV show; Fernanda TV show; Manolito de la Maria; Gregorio and Andorrano, June 1971

J67 (GB)

[red BASF] Q – Diego

[starts at 8’] Juan Talega, Fernandillo…

J68

Manolo de Huelva (G) – [copy] – 1968 – accompanies Vallejo [from 78’s] – then, from tape made secretly by Chris Carnes and offered for sale on his Zincali label: Juerga with Luis Caballero (singer) and Gaspar de Utrera (singer) – Mirabras, Mal, Mal, Taranta

(cont’d) – Taranta (restarted), Sol, Sig, Bul

J69

Manolo de Huelva (G) – [copy] – 1968 – accompanies Vallejo [from 78’s] – then, from tape made secretly by Chris Carnes and offered for sale on his Zincali label: Juerga with Luis Caballero (singer) and Gaspar de Utrera (singer) [?] – Mirabras, Mal, Mal, Taranta

(cont’d) – Taranta (restarted), Sol, Sig, Bul

J70 (BZ)

[U.S.] Miguel “El Funi”, Diego Vargas, David Serva – after show

J71 [v. J68 – same]

Manolo de Huelva (G) – [copy] – 1968 – accompanies Vallejo [from 78’s] – then, from tape made secretly by Chris Carnes and offered for sale on his Zincali label: Juerga with Luis Caballero (singer) and Gaspar de Utrera (singer) [? – doubts raised on thid ID]- Mirabras, Mal, Mal, Taranta

(cont’d) – Taranta (restarted), Sol, Sig, Bul

J72 (BZ) (+SD)

[after performance of Flamenco Puro, Nov. 14, 1980 - performance may be on this tape] – Ken Parker (G), Domingo Alvarado (singer); Jay Kantor (aficionado) – in hotel lobby where artists were staying

(cont’d)

J73 (BZ) (+L)

Agujetas at Sangria restaurant in New York, 1976

(cont’d) – then – Evan Harrar [Lesson to BZ] – badly recorded

J74

Lebrija – 1988 – No copies – Paco Pedroza, cante [?]

(cont’d) – also D. Jones [David Serva]

J75

[copy] – Recorded by Ray Dobta, from Danny Estulin – Diego, Fernanda, Joselero, Paco – Aug. 1969

J76

Diego: La Fernanda, Perrate, La Bernarda, Paco, Curro Mairena, Joselero y Fernandill

(cont’d)

J77

[M99 (5)] – Moron – Dieguito – Fiesta

(blank)

J78

Abuela, Bastian, Miguel

Baptism – March, 1969 – Miguel, BdU, Pedrito, Gaspar

J79

Fernando Terremoto [hijo] w/Juan Parilla at Pena Chacon – May 6, 1993 – Tientos – Tangos; Sig; Mal; Fand; Sol por Bul; Taranta; Bul

(cont’d) – Bul (cont’d)

J80

Fiesta at Pepe Amaya’s

Diego and Joselero – Andorrano – After TV show

J81

Diego del Gastor

_____

J82

[M99 (30)] – Dieguito – Sevilla – April 21, 1970 – Sol, Bul, Sig

(cont’d) – then blank

J83

[M99 (20)] – Juerga – Diego, etc. – from BASF 90

(cont’d)

J84(TB)

Received 1984 – Mellizo on Chris’ Roof

Mellizo, Diego, Fernanda, Perrate, Paco

J85

Diego del Gastor, Joselero – 1970

_____

J86

Diego, Manolito

(cont’d)

J87

Sutton Place Juerga – in apartment of Julio Noyes – Mario Escudero, many others

(cont’d)

J88 [v. J75 – same]

Recorded by Ray Dobta, from Danny Estulin – Diego, Fernanda, Joselero, Paco – Aug. 1969

J89

Juerga and Diego – copied to M99(20)

(cont’d)

J90 (+RS)

Nina de los Peines (from reissue of 78’s) – Saeta “Ay Pilatos”, Al “Un duro le di…”, Sig “Tu no tienes la culpa”, Petenera “Quisiera yo”, Sig “Delante de mi mare”, Tango “Yo no te …”, “Cantes de Granada””Un sereno se dormia”, Mal “Del convento…”, Sevillanas, Sol por Bul “Mi mare me lo decia”, Bamberas – Then – Juan Talega w/_____: Tonas, Sig – Then – Joselero w/_____: Sig

[non flamenco] – jazz – Billie Holiday

J91 [v. J75, J88 – same]

Recorded by Ray Dobta, from Danny Estulin – Diego, Fernanda, Joselero, Paco – Aug. 1969

J92

[From Tomas de Utrera] – 1967 – Manolo Heras – Sol, Sig, “Levante”, Tarantas, Peteneras, Tientos – Then – 1970 – Rancapino – Sig, Sol

(cont’d) – Agustin Rios [“Agustin de Moron”] – Sol, Bul; El Diamante Negro – Sig, Sol, “Poesia a Manolete”, Cantinas – El Tranviario – Mal, Abandola

J93

Diego del Gastor con Fernandillo – “For Arturo” – _____

(cont’d)

J94

Tape from Evan Harrar – Side 1, track 2/3 – Juerga – Paco del Gastor – Sig, Bul

(cont’d)

J95

Fernanda, Diego, Manolito – Bulerias

Juan Talegas – Diego, Paco – Solo Bul

J96

[Ampex cassette] – Antonio Escalona [old guitarist/singer accompanies himself]– Then – Pedro Escalona [guitarist son of Antonio] (BZ and Paul Hecht listening to tape from Hecht)

(cont’d)

J97 [v. J96 – continuation of same session]

Jose Vargas w/Pedro Escalona (BZ and Paul Hecht listening to tape from Hecht) – continued from Ampex cassette

Non-flamenco – Family at Turin House

J98 [v. J97]

Moron – From _____ — Joselero, Fernanda, etc.

(cont’d) – 1/3 of tape

J99 (+RG)

Moron – Diego, Fernanda, etc. – from open reel tape — badly recorded

Perico del Lunar – LP – BAM _____ (France) – Zapateado, Sig, Petenera, Taranto – Then – From open reel tape – Moron – Diego, Joselero, etc.

J100

Moron – Diego, Manolito [?], Fernanda, etc.

(cont’d)

J101

JK 1 [from open-reel tape 1 from Jay Kantor] – Diego del Gastor, Paco del Gastor – all guitar solos – Sol, Bul, Sol, Bul, _____

(cont’d)

J102

From Vicente Granados – Grabada en casa de Pohren – Sol (Manolito de la Maria, Diego del Gastor), Sol, Sig, Bul (Paco del Gastor guitar solos) – _____

(cont’d) – Bul (Paco del Gastor guitar solo), Sol (Antonio Mairena w/Eduardo de la Malena); Sig (Francisco Mairena w/Eduardo de la Malena); Bul in A minor (Eduardo de la Malena); Sol (Pepe Torres w/Eduardo Malena); conversation (Pepe Torre)

F1

Gazpacho 1969 – ‘69 Moron Gazpacho [?] – Bul, Terremoto w/M. Morao; Sig, Sol, Antonio Mairena w/MdM [?]; Bul, Curro Malena w/Pedro Pena; Tientos, Sig, Manuel Mairena w/MdM [?]

(cont’d) — Sig, Manuel Mairena w/MdM [?] (cont’d); Sig, Taranto, Chocolate; Moron Gazpacho 1969 – Sol, Sig, Chocolate; Sig, Bul, Antonio Mairena; Sig (G), Bul (G), Sol (G) [cut], PdG

F2

Gazpacho 1969 – ‘69 Moron Gazpacho (cont’d) – from Granados – PdG: Sig (G); Bul (G); DdG: Sol (G); Festival at Puebla de Cazalla, 1968: Sig, Sol, Francisco Mairena; Sig, Sol, Terremoto; Ronda Festival 1971: Sol, Agujetas w/Poeta

(cont’d) — Sol, Chocolate w/Poeta; Sig, Mart, Agujeta w/Poeta; Sig, Curro Malena w/Pedro Bacan; Cantinas, Fosforito w/Habichuela [Juan Habichuela?]; Bul, Curro Malena w/Pedro Bacan; Tientos, Fosforito w/Habichuela; Moron Pena Flamenca, 1971: Tientos, Manuel Mairena w/PdG; Bul por Sol, Antonio Mairena w/PdG

F3

Gazpacho 1969 – ‘69 Moron Gazpacho

(cont’d)

F4 (JK)

Feria de Utrera – Sept. 14, 1991 – tape 1 – Cabrillero, _____

(cont’d)[?]

F5 (JK)

Feria de Utrera – Sept. 7, 1991 – tape 2 – 2/3

(blank)

F6 (JK)

Lebrija, 1991 – Funi, Bacan (1/2)

(blank)

F7

Mac’s tape of Berglof tape[?] – Gazpacho, etc. –

(cont’d)

F8

Tape of Festival performances, from Danny Estulin – Jerez, 1972 – Sol (Diego Rubichi w/Rafael Alarcon; Bul – estilo de Chozas – (El Nano de Jerez, Paco “El Gasolina” w/Rafael Alarcon); Bul (El Nano de Jerez, Paco “El Gasolina”, El Garbanzo, Diego Rubichi, Manuel Moneo y Juan Moneo w/Moraito, Nino Jero, y Rafael Alarcon); Bul (El Borrico w/Nino Jero)

Jerez, 1972 – cont’d – Sol (Antonio Agujetas w/Moraito, Manuel Agujetas w/David Serva, Agujetas el Viejo [Agujetas, padre] w/Rafael Alarcon – Then – Lebrija 1988, _____ – Funi; San Benito [?] – Then – El Moro de Badajoz w/Manolo Sanlucar – Then – Antonio Mairena w/Enrique de Melchor, Festival de Mairena, 1980 – Then – Sol por Bul (Pedro Pena [cante] w/Pedro Bacan; Sol por Bul (Antonio Agujetas w/Moraito)

F9

Teremoto de Jerez w/Manuel Morao– at Fiesta de la Buleria de Jerez, 1978 – Sig “Ahora si que te llamo”, Fand “Que borrachera”, Bul “Me tirastes un limon”, Sig “Eran dos dias senalaito”, Bul “Amparo”

(cont’d) – Fand “Los ninos chicos cuando lloran”, Bul “No te metas con mi mare”; Sig “Contemparme a mi madre”, Bul “Erales” – Then – El Chocolate w/Nino Jero: Sol, Taranto

F10

Duran Collection – Festival de Mairena, 1967 – Sol (Miguel Maya w/Pedrito Sevilla con Trini Espana, baile; Cantinas, Taranto (Fosforito w/Juan Carmona “Habichuela”); Sol (Juan Talega w/Manolo de Brenes); Sig (Antonio Mairena w/Juan Carmona “Habichuela”;
Bul, Cantinas (Manolo Heredia w/Manolo de Brenes); Sig (Paco Fernandez w/Manolo de Brenes)

(cont’d) – Sig (Paco Fernandez w/ Manolo de Brenes); Then – Festival de Alcala, 1967 – Al de Cordoba (_____ w/Manolo de Brenes [?]); Mart (Antonio Mairena); Bul (Manolo Heredia w/Paco del Gastor); Sol (El Perrate w/Paco del Gastor); Sig (Paco Fernandez w/Manolo de Brenes); Tientos (Bernardo de los Lobitos w/Juan Carmona “Habichuela”)

F11 (+J)

Duran Collection – Continued – Mal (Bernardo de los Lobitos w/Juan Carmona “Habichuela”; Bul (Antonio Mairena w/Manolo de Brenes); Sil, Sig (Jose Menese w/Paco del Gastor); Sol (Antonio Mairena w/Juan Carmona “Habichuela”) – Then – Finca Espartero – Juerga – Joselero: Mart – Then – Potaje de Utrera Festival, 1971 – _____

(cont’d) – Potaje de Utrera, 1971 – _____

F12

Festival Los Corrales – El Arenal – Aug. 5, 1982 – Camaron, Ana Reverte –

(cont’d) – Paco Taranto, Camaron – Then – Almunecar [Festival?] – Juanito Villar, El Lebrijano

F13(TB)

Gazpacho Andaluz – Moron – Diego, Luis, Fernandillo

(cont’d) – Moron

F14

Berglof Tape – Moron Gazpacho, etc.

(cont’d)

F15

Ronda, 1981 – Terremoto: Sol, Sig de Manuel Torre, Bul; Antonio Lopez Colon [?]: _____; Mairena del Alcor Festival: Antonio Mairena w/el Poeta [?]: Sig, Sol, Cantina, Tona

(cont’d): Antonio Mairena w/el Poeta: Sol, Bul; Moron de la Frontera [session at Pena Flamenca 1981, not festival] – Juan del Gastor: Cantinas, Bul

F16

Paradas Festival – April 24, 1993 – Curro Malena w/Jose Luis Postigo; Jose Menese w/Melchor, hijo

(cont’d) – Jose Menese w/Melchor, hijo; Miguel Vargas…

F17

Moron Festival – Aug. 1993

(cont’d)

F18

Moron Festival 2 – Aug. 1993

(cont’d)

F19

Festival de Cordoba, 1994 – Vicente Amigo – (first 2/3) – Then – Homenaje a Beni de Cadiz

(blank)

F20

Festival in Piriana (Malaga province) – May 13, 1993

(cont’d)

F21

Festival [?] – original from ? – Fernando Terremoto w/Morao – Sol, Sig, Fand

(cont’d) – other singer [?] – Sol, Tientos, Mal, Bul

F22 (+G)

Fosforito w/Paco de Lucia – Jerez Catedra del Flamenco Festival

David Serva – solo guitar

F23 (+G) [v. F22 – same]

Fosforito w/Paco de Lucia – Jerez Catedra del Flamenco Festival

David Serva – solo guitar

F24 (+SG)

Serranito in concert (2/3 of side) – Then – Festival at _____ – El Polaco, El Yaya, Mariquilla, Manuel Santiago (last 1/3)

Festival at _____ [same?] – Calixto Sanchez w/Enrique de Melchor, Manuel Mairena w/Juan Habichuela

F25(JK)

From Jay Kantor – big [open reel] tape 2 [?] – Utrera Caseta, Bacan – Festival in Jerez, Chocolate, Agujeta (Morao)

from JK2 [?] – Festival in Jerez (cont’d), Chocolate, Agujeta, Terremoto

F26(JK)

From Jay Kantor – Utrera, 1991 / Lebrija – Caseta Municipal, 1991

(cont’d)

F27 (JK)

From Jay Kantor – Feria de Utrera, Sept. 8, 1990

(cont’d)

F28 (JK)

Jerez, 1985

(cont’d)

F29

Fosforito w/_____, Antonio Mairena w/Paco de Lucia – Festival en Puente Genil – Aug. 14, 1970

2a Antorcha del Cante, 1970 – [Mairena del Alcor] – Fosforito – Sig y Martinete (Chocolate)

F30 [v. F29 – same]

Fosforito w/_____, Antonio Mairena w/Paco de Lucia – Festival en Puente Genil – Aug. 14, 1970

2a Antorcha del Cante, 1970 – [Mairena del Alcor] – Fosforito – Sig y Martinete (Chocolate)

F31 [v. F29 and F30 – same]

Fosforito w/_____, Antonio Mairena w/Paco de Lucia – Festival en Puente Genil – Aug. 14, 1970

2a Antorcha del Cante, 1970 – [Mairena del Alcor] – Fosforito – Sig y Martinete (Chocolate)

F32 [v. F-- – same]

[copy 3] – Blank [failed to record?] – was described as “2a Antorcha del Cante, [Mairena del Alcor], 1970; Fosforito, Chocolate – Sig, Mart

Fosforito w/_____, Antonio Mairena w/Paco de Lucia, Puente Genil, Aug. 14, 1970

F33 [v. F-- - same]

[copy 2] – 2a Antorcha del Cante [Mairena del Alcor] – 1970 – Fosforito, Chocolate – Sig, Mart

Fosforito w/_____, Antonio Mairena w/Paco de Lucia, Puente Genil, Aug. 14, 1970

F34 (+L)

[from Mac King?] [C-120 tape] – Mario Maya, dance: Serranas; El Chocolate: Sig; La Sallago: Al; El Chocolate: Taranto; _____: Cana; El Chocolate: Debla

(cont’d) – El Chocolate: Taranto: La Sallago: Al, Tientos; – Brook Lesson [BZ lesson to Mac King] – various falsetas, Sol, Bul

F35

Festival de Granada – _____

(cont’d) – Jose Merce, Juana la del Revuelo, gente de Mariquilla por fiesta

F36

Dieguito, Gazpacho

(cont’d)[?]

F37

Lebrija – Festival Flamenco – March 18, 1992

(cont’d)

F38

Lebrija – Festival Flamenco – March 18, 1992 [continuation of previous?]

(cont’d)

F39 (+B)

TV Special from Madrid – May 6, 1985 – Then – Festival in Sevilla – June 1, 1985 – Jose de la Tomasa

(cont’d) – Jose Menese, Camaron

F40

Diego del Gastor – from Rito y Geografia film – copied from Sony 60’ tape

(cont’d)

F41

[cassette sold privately] – Camaron de la Isla w/Tomatito – “En Directo” – “Extraido del Festival de la Mistela, Los Palacios, 1990” – Bul “Lo que me pasa contigo”, Al “Bendita sea la tierra”, Bul “Yo hago mis canastas”, Fand “Que te tienes que morir”

(cont’d) – “Extraido del Festival de Ojen (Malaga), 1990 – Sol “La ausencia causa olvio”, Taranto “Corre y dile a mi Grabiela”, Tangos “Una rosa pa tu pelo”, Bul “Tiritando de frio”

F42 [v. F__ – same?]

Homage to Beni de Cadiz –

(blank)

F43 (+L)

Festival at _____ — guitarists, singers – Tomatito, etc. – Then – Lesson to Miguel Rodriguez [?] from Jose Cordoba [?] – Bul

(cont’d) – lesson – Then – to Festival – intro – Antonio Mairena [?] w/Enrique de Melchor – Sol, Sig – Then – Chocolate [?] [voice cut out] – Jose Merce w/_____ — Bul

F44 (AM)

Festival – Triana – 1981

Cancanilla – Chuscales

F45 (AM)

Festival – Italica (Sevilla) – Aug. 9, 1984

(cont’d)

F46 (AM)

Lola Flores – El Mimbre en Alegria – La Trocha en la Feria – April, 1985

La Trocha en la Feria – Grupo Moderno

F47 (AM)

La Maestranza, Sevilla – June 2, 1991 – Javier Baron, Aurora Vargas – 1/2 of tape

Café de Chinitas, Madrid – Tablao

F48 (AM)

Los Corrales – Flamenco Festival [?]

Jose Miguel [?]

F49 (AM)

Almunecar, Spain – Festival – Juanito Villar, Manolo Dominguez (G), El Lebrijano, Ana Pena, Tomatito (G), Camaron, Fernanda de Utrera, Bernarda de Utrera, Los Montoya, Habichuela (G)

(cont’d)

F50 (AM)

Festival of Cante – Familia Fernandez – New York [?]

Paco de Lucia – recordings – La Sabina, etc; then Gran, then from Fabulos Guitarra: Bul, Fand, Tientos

SD1 (BZ)

Gypsy Passion – November 18, 1992 – Juana la del Pipa, Morao, etc.

(cont’d) – 1/3 of side only

SD2 (BZ) (+B)

Paco de Valdepenas at Barcelona Paradis – Paco de Valdepenas, baile y cante; Jorge Narvarro, baile; Enrique Escudero, guitarra – Sept. 10, 1995

(non flamenco) – French radio show – RFI

SD3 (BZ)

El Torombo and his group at Symphony Space, March 11, 1995

(cont’d)

SD4 (BZ)

Morao Production at Bienal de Sevilla, 1994

(cont’d) [?]

SD5 (AM)

Manolete – Live – Sunday Matinee

(cont’d) [?]

SD6 (AM)

Manolete – Homage a Picasso – Montreal

(cont’d) [?]

SD7 (AM)

Manolete – Casa de Espana, New York

(cont’d) [?]

SD8 (AM)

Familia Fernandez

(cont’d) [?]

SD9 (BZ)

Flamenco Puro – Nov. 13, 1980

(cont’d) and Flamenco Puro from Nov. 14, 1980 [Dolby C]

SD10 (BZ)

Flamenco Puro – Nov. 14, 1980 – Second half

_____

SD11 (BZ)

Flamenco Puro – Nov. 12, 1980

(cont’d)

SD12 (BZ)

Flamenco Puro – Oct. 30, 1980 [No Dolby]

SD13

Blanca del Rey at Corral de la Moreria, Madrid – July, 1985 – [guitarist David Serva?]

(cont’d)

SD14 [v. SD13 – same?]

Blanca del Rey

(cont’d)

SD15

Flamenco Puro in NYC — _____

(cont’d)

SD16 (AM)

Flamenco Puro

(cont’d) – 1/3 of tape

SD17 (AM)

Flamenco Puro – Chicago

(blank)

SD18 (AM)

Flamenco Puro

(cont’d) [?]

SD19 (AM)

Flamenco Puro – NY – [NY and Chicago?]

(cont’d)

SD20 (AM)

Flamenco Puro

(cont’d) – 1/2 of tape

SD21

Manolete

_____

SD22

[first 1/3 is disc information, transcribed] – Navidad Flamenca – Newark, N.J. – Dec. 1999 – Carlota Santana, Clara Mora, David Serva, Antonio Vizarraga, Jose Torre

(cont’d)

SD23 (BZ)

Menkes Show – Nov. 1999 – compas – Maya de Silva (dance), Pedro Cortes (guitar), La Conja (song)

SD24 (BZ)

Flamenco Gitano – at Symphony Space, NYC – Nov. 19, _____ –

Flamenco Gitano – continuation of Friday and all of Saturday – Funi, etc.

SD25

Antonio Canales –M. Vivo [?] – New Age Center – May 12, 1990

_____

SD26 (BZ)

Show at Alegrias, NYC – Nov. 1999

_____

SD27 (BZ)

Farruquito y Familia – Symphony Space, NYC – World Music Institute – Jan. 2001

(cont’d)

SD28 (BZ)

[J][?] Farruquito y Familia – [at Meson Flamenco in Brooklyn after the show?]

[cont’d]

SD29

World Music Institute – NYC – East Indian Kathak music and flamenco [with dance?]

(cont’d)

SD30 (BZ)

Gypsy Passion – production by Tomas Pantoja at Plymouth Theater – Dec. 1992 – Morao, etc.

blank

SD31 (BZ)

At Meson Flamenco – Elena Andujar w/Chuscales – March, 2000

Blank

SD32 (BZ)

At Alegrias – Igor [Enrique Vargas] and Luis Vargas – first 1/3 of tape

SD33 (BZ)

Jose Greco II – at Brooklyn College – Feb. 20, 1999

(cont’d)

SD34

Farruco – Expo de Sevilla – 1992 [?]

(cont’d) – [defective recording?]

SD35

Farruquito, Farruquita at _____ – Bul, Al, _____

(cont’d)

SD36

Los Gallos – 1990 [show in Sevilla tablao]

Rafael Riqueni – [recording]

SD37

Spanish Dance Arts – New York production? – [recorded orchestra, then live music]

(cont’d)

SD38

? – Stage show, possibly NY, possibly Pedro Cortes, Paco Ortiz…

(cont’d)

SD39

Triana – Hoy y Ayer – Live production in Spain – “Al cante: Pastora del Pati (?), Juan Manuel Lopez a la guitarra – Antonio Saavedra al cante – Linda Vega [?] – Antonia Suarez, dance (?)

SD40

Alegria – Concha Vargas with Arturo – ABT – April, 1993

Vittorio [flamenco teacher in NY] – performance, rehearsal (?)

SD41

Al Alba – live production – Chuscales, guitar

_____

SD42

Medea – production

(cont’d)

SD43

Flamenco Moro – Elena’s show at Fazil’s [?]

(cont’d) [?]

SD44

Festival at Cine Olympia (Paris?) – 1978

Blank

SD45

Patio Andaluz – Tablao in _____

(cont’d)

SD46(BZ)

Noche Flamenca – Soledad Barrios y Martin Santangelo – NY – David Serva, guitar (solo Bul)

SD47

Rivera Dance Company [Chip Bond, guitarist]

(cont’d)

SD48 (AM)

Mario Maya – Avery Fisher Hall, New York

Arturo Martinez – Practice tape – 1/2 of tape

SD49 (AM)

Mario Maya – Camelamos Naquerar [?] – Musical Jondo

(cont’d) [?]

SD50 (AM)

Mario Maya – Musical Jondo – First Bienal Flamenco de Sevilla – 1980

SD51 (AM)

Mario Maya – Avery Fisher Hall, New York

(blank)

SD52 (AM)

Mario Maya

Moorish music

SD53 (AM)

Cumbre Flamenco

(cont’d)

SD54 (AM)

Cumbre Flamenco – 1/2 of tape

(blank)

SD55 (AM)

Cumbre Flamenco – Public Theater, New York City – El Guito, Enrique Morente…

(blank) [?]

SD56 (AM)

Cumbre Flamenco – New York – Enrique Morente, La Paquera

(cont’d) [?]

SD57 (AM)

Cumbre Flamenco II – Fernanda de Utrera, Bernarda de Utrera, Paquera de Jerez, Paco del Gastor

(cont’d)

SD58 (AM)

Cumbre Flamenco

(cont’d)

SD59 (AM)

Familia Montoya – Public Theater, New York – Aug. 1984

(cont’d)

SD60 (AM)

Familia Fernandez

(cont’d) [?]

SD61 (AM)

Live at El Cid

(cont’d) – 1/4 of tape

SD62 (AM)

Live at El Cid (2)

(cont’d) [?]

SD63 (AM)

Malaga Tablao [?] – New York [?] – Pedro Cortes, hijo, guitar

(cont’d)

SD64 (AM)

Malaga Tablao – Torremolinos

(cont’d)

SD65 (AM)

Malaga Tablao

(cont’d)

SD66 (AM)

Los Gallos – Tablao en Sevilla – 1985 – Bul, Sig, Tientos, Aleg, Rumba, Aleg, Sig

(cont’d) – Rumba (cut), Sol, Aleg

SD67 (AM)

Concha Vargas, Pepito Priego, Kiki de Utrera – Toronto

(cont’d)

SD68 (AM)

Art Flamenco – Live

(cont’d) [?]

SD69 (AM)

Los Gallos – Tablao Flamenco – Sevilla – 1985

(cont’d)

SD70 (AM)

Cumbre Flamenco I [?]

Mario Escudero, Paco Cortes

SD71 (AM)

Mario Maya

(cont’d)

SD72 (AM)

Flamenco Puro

(cont’d) [?]

SD73 (AM)

Manolete – Philadelphia

(cont’d) [?]

SD74

From Connie Keyse – Tarantos (Enrique el Cojo), Bamberas, Solea (El Farruco) – May 8, 1985

(blank)

SG1 (BZ)

Homage to Sabicas, June 3, 1989 – Jeronimo [age 11], Enrique Morente w/Montoyita

Paco de Lucia and Ramon de Algeciras

SG2 (BZ)

Homage to Sabicas, June 3, 1981 – Original – Jeronimo, Enrique Morente [w/Montoyita]

Paco de Lucia [and Ramon de Algeciras]

SG3 (BZ)

Sabicas, _____ – Sabicas in Concert

(cont’d)[?]

SG4

Sabicas, March 28, 1987 – Sabicas 3.28.87

(cont’d)[?]

SG5 (BZ)

Sabicas, Oct. 8, 1982 – Sabicas at CAMI Hall Oct. 8, 1982

(cont’d)

SG6 (BZ)

Sabicas, Sept. 24, 1982 – Sabicas, Tarrytown [New York], Sept. 24, 1982 / Sabicas – Guajira, Bul, Zapateado en Re, Mal (Lecuona), “Surprise”; _____

(cont’d)[?]

SG7 (BZ)

Sabicas, Oct. 21, 1979 – concert

(cont’d)[?]

SG8

Sabicas – Homage to Sabicas – June 3, 1989 – 3 – Sabicas

(blank)[?]

SG9 (BZ)

Homage to Sabicas, June 3, 1981 – Original, damaged toward end – Part 2 (end) – 2/3 of tape – Sabicas

(blank)[?]

SG10 (BZ)

Homage to Sabicas, June 3, 1981 – Sabicas

(cont’d)[/]

SG11 (BZ)

Fusion at the Beacon, early 1984 – Al diMeola, Paco de Lucia, Larry Coryell (?), also Steve Morse [of the Dixie Dregs]

(cont’d)[?]

SG12

Paco de Lucia and Sextet – Avery Fisher Hall – Sept. 25, 1993

(cont’d)

SG13

Paco de Lucia – New York concert ?? – End fragment

[non flamenco: French radio – RFI – ]

SG14 (+SS or F)

David Jones at _____

Miguel Rodriguez, Tomatito at _____

SG15 (BZ)

Anton Gimenez with Igor (“Enrique Vargas”) and Basilio at AIG, Jan. 28, 1992

(blank)

SG16

Concurso de Cante de Cordoba – 1992 – guitar – some with cante

(cont’d)

SG17

Paco de Lucia live at _____ – 1/3 of side – intermittent cutouts – Bul with cante y baile “Yo no quiero dinero”, Sol (G) “Cuando canta el gallo” and “Gloria al Nino Ricardo”, Bul with cante y baile [cut]

(cont’d) – end of a Sol, Fand de H. “Montino” [?], Song from Carmen (poor quality), Jaleo (?), con bajo, Bul with cante, flute, group, Al, Bul [same show?]

SG18

Pepe Habichuela at _____ – with cante y baile

(cont’d)

SG19 [v. SG18 – same?]

Pepe Habichuela at _____ – with cante y baile

(cont’d)

SG20

Paco de Lucia, John McLaughlin and Al DiMeola – Live in Mexico City – 1981 – Part 1

(blank)

SG21

Paco de Lucia, John McLaughlin and Al DiMeola – Live in Mexico City – 1981 – Part 2

(blank)

SG22 [v. SG17 – same show?? Same tour??]

Paco de Lucia live in Toronto – (material from Solo Quiero Caminar and Siroco) – Minera, Fand de H., Sol, Al in A, Colombiana, Tango, Bul, _____ (theme from Carmen?)

(blank)

SG23

Pedro Bacan – live concert at _____ – poor recording – Sol, Tango, Gran, Bul – 1/2 of tape – 2nd half blank

(cont’d) – Taranta, Aleg, Sig, Guajira, Bul – last 1/4 of tape is blank

SG24

Paco de Lucia at Carnegie Hall – a spoken intro – his set only [?] – enters after 5 minutes of gentle jazz

Non flamenco – gentle jazz

SG25

Pepe Habichuela at _____

Pepe Habichuela – Baile Contest, Corboda, 1983 (Bul, Sol) – then – improvisation of monster Juan Manuel Canizares

SG26

Pepe Habichuela – Concert in Toronto, 1981 – Gran, Sol, Tango, Jaleos, Taranta, Bul in E, Sig, Bul – 1/2 over-recorded – Also Bill Glidden and Manolete

(blank)

SG27

David Serva – Concert – San Francisco – Feb. 1985

(cont’d)

SG28 (BZ)

Paco de Lucia, Al DiMeola, John McLaughlin at Carnegie Hall, Dec. 2, 1980 – Part 1

(cont’d)

SG29 (BZ)

Paco de Lucia, Al DiMeola, John McLaughlin at Carnegie Hall, Dec. 2, 1980 – Part 2

(cont’d)

SG30

Bienal de Sevilla, Guitar, 1984 – Pedro Bacan: Al, Guajira; Tomatito: Rondena, Sol, Bul; Jose Antonio Rodriguez: Mal, Al: Bul, Jose Antonio Rodriguez with Chano Lobato, cante and El Mimbre, baile: Rafael Riqueni: Al, Bul; Paco del Gastor: Guajira, Al, Sig; Manolo Franco with El Chozas, cante and M. Vargas [Manuela Vargas ?], Diego el Boqueron, Angelita Vargas [?], baile [?]: Al, Taranto, Bul

(cont’d)[?]

SG31

Manuel Parilla, Juan Parilla, Bernardo Parilla (violin?) – Bienal Flamenca de Sevilla – _____

Manolo Sanlucar – Bienal Flamenca de Sevilla – _____ – [?]

SG32

El Bola – Esencia Jonda – Bienal Flamenca de Sevilla – Sept. 11, 1990

(cont’d)

SG33

Pepe Habichuela – Lope de Vega Theater – Corral del Conde – Sept. 20, 1990

(cont’d)

SG34

Serranito at Metropolitan Museum, New York City (c. 1991)

(cont’d)

SG35

Pedro Bacan at Minnesota College of Art and Design, October, 1976

(cont’d)[?]

SG36(BZ)

Pedro Bacan, NYC, March 19, 1994

(cont’d)

SG37

Pedro Bacan – Seattle – Feb. 1977 – Recorded in Seattle church by Alan Yonge – Sol, Tientos, Rondenas, Bul

(cont’d) – Tarantas, Aleg, Sig, Guajiras, Bul

SG38 (BZ)

Guillermo Rios Concert [Bill Glidden] – March 29, 1986

(cont’d)

SG39 (BZ)

Mario Escudero at Carboneria, Sevilla, Oct. 12, 1992

(blank)

SG40 (BZ)

Paco Pena Concert – March 10, 1983

(cont’d)

SG41

Rene Heredia’s Flamenco Jazz Fusion

(cont’d) [C-30 tape]

SG42

Juan Martin – Concert – Oct. 19, 1994

(cont’d)

SG43

Bienal de Sevilla – 1984 – Paco del Gastor: Al, Sig, Gran, Bul, Guajira – Then – Rafael Riqueni: Al, Bul

(cont’d) – Tomatito – 1984 – Sol, Bul, Al, Sig, Bul, Rondena – Then – Jose Antonio Rodriguez: Al, _____

SG44 [v. SG12 – same?]

Paco de Lucia and his Sextet – Avery Fisher Hall

(cont’d)

SG45

Paco de Lucia and Chick Corea – _____ – “Duet for Guitar and Piano”

Ketama 1979

SG46

Paco de Lucia in Milano

(cont’d)

SG47

Rafael Riqueni – Bienal Flamenca de Sevilla – 1990

Pedro Pena y David Pena [piano flamenco? “Dorantes”?] – Bienal Flamenca de Sevilla – 1990

SG48 [v. SG34 – same performance, different taping]

Serranito live at Metropolitan Museum, New York City – Nov. 20, 1991

(cont’d)

SG49

Serrantito at Metropolitan Museum, New York City – Nov. 20, 1991 – con Oscar Luis Herrero y Miguel Rivera* – Tarantas, Serrana,, Gran, Tango, Sol, Sevillanas, Zapateado

(cont’d) – Bul*, Aleg*, Guajira*, Rumba*, “Agua, tierra, fuego y aire”*

SG50

Paco de Lucia – Live in Holland – _____

(cont’d) [?]

SG51

Paco de Lucia – Live in Montreal – _____

(cont’d)

SG52 (+RG)

Carlos Ramos – concert – Dallas – 1961

Arte Flamenco – Carlos Ramos – _____ – _____

SG53

Bienal Flamenca de Sevilla, 1984 – Tomatito: Al, Sig, Bul; Jose Antonio Rodriguez: Guajira, Sig, Bul; Rafael Riqueni con Jose de la Tomasa, cante: Gran, Sol; Paco del Gastor: Sol

(cont’d) – Paco del Gastor: Gran, Bul; Manolo Franco: Taranto; Pedro Bacan con Rancapino, cante: Sol; Pedro Bacan w/Miguel “El Funi”; Nino Jero con Familia Montoya: Bul

SG54 [v. SG 46 – same?]

Paco de Lucia in Milano – 1984 [1989] –

(cont’d) – Paco de Lucia in Milano – Then – Rosa Maria – Camaron w/Paco de Lucia – _____ – _____

SG55 (TB)

Paco del Gastor – Bienal del Arte Flamenco [Bienal de Sevilla] – 1984 – [“Fasten your seat belts!”] [original]

(cont’d)

SG56 (TB) [v. SG55(TB) – same]

Paco del Gastor – Bienal del Arte Flamenco [Bienal de Sevilla] – 1984 – [“Fasten your seat belts!”]

(cont’d)

SG57 [v. SG2 – same?]

Homage to Sabicas – June 3, 1989 – Part 2 – 2/3 of tape – Sabicas – damaged toward end

(blank)

SG58 [v. SG2 – same?]

Homage to Sabicas – Sabicas

(blank)

SG59 [v. SG30 – same]

Bienal de Sevilla, Guitar, 1984 – Pedro Bacan: Al, Guajira; Tomatito: Rondena, Sol, Bul; Jose Antonio Rodriguez: Mal, Al: Bul, Jose Antonio Rodriguez with Chano Lobato, cante and El Mimbre, baile: Rafael Riqueni: Al, Bul; Paco del Gastor: Guajira, Al, Sig; Manolo Franco with El Chozas, cante and M. Vargas [Manuela Vargas ?], Diego el Boqueron, Angelita Vargas [?], baile [?]: Al, Taranto, Bul

(cont’d)

SG60 (+RG)

David Jones – Concert at _____ – Then – Pericon de Cadiz tells a story (from a recording?) – Then – Christmas songs

The Music of Spain (National Geographic Society) – complete, includes 3 cuts of Diego del Gastor playing Bulerias

SG61

David Serva – 1983 – concert – 2/3 of tape

(blank)

SG62

Paco de Lucia – Concert in _____ — _____

(cont’d)

SG63

Paco de Lucia – Concert in Madrid – July, 1984

(cont’d)

SG64

Paco de Lucia – Bienal Flamenco de Sevilla – 1988

(cont’d)

SG65

Paco de Lucia – Concert in Paris – 1993

(cont’d)

SG66

Steve Kahn at Kavehas – April 1, 2001 [?]

(cont’d)

SG67

Steve Kahn at Kavehas – Jan. 20, 2001

(cont’d)

SG68

Steve Kahn at Kavehas – June 1, 2001 – bad recording

(cont’d)

SG69

Steve Kahn at Kavehas – Feb. 2001

(cont’d)

SG70

Steve Kahn at Kavehas – April 21, 2000

(cont’d)

SG71

Steve Kahn at Kavehas – April 21, 2000 – 1/2 of tape

Non-flamenco – record info (transcribed)

SG72

Steve Kahn at Kavehas – Feb. 2001

Steve Kahn [Lesson to BZ] – bad recording

SG73

Paco de Lucia – Concert at _____

(cont’d)

SG74

Paco de Lucia – Concert in Sevilla — _____

(cont’d)

SG75 (AM)

Paco Pena Live

(cont’d)

SG76 (BZ)

Paco de Lucia – Beacon Theater – New York City – April 28, 2001

(cont’d)

SG77 (BZ)

Paco de Lucia – Beacon Theater – New York City – April 28, 2001 – continues

(blank)

SS1

Chano Lobato w/Paco del Gastor, Almeda Theatre, London, June 13, 1986

[music from] Greece, Turkey

SS2

Agujetas, David Serva at Casa Patas

(cont’d)

SS3

From Danny Estulin – David Serva, Manuel de Paula, Miguel Funi in Israel

From Ray Dobta, via Danny Estulin – Part 2 – Diego, Joselero, Fernanda – Part 2

SS4

Tape 2 – Ansonini – U. of W. [University of Washington] – Ansonini w/Ken Parker “Keni el Lebrijano” – _____ – _____ – Bul encore – and 1972 set with same artists

Ansonini w/Ken Parker “Keni el Lebrijano” – 1972 [?] – Pedro Bacan Concert (1977)

SS6

Club? [Pohren’s Club?] From Evan H? Short 5” tape (includes Mairena, Fernanda, Perla de Cadiz, etc. – Moron guitar, including Paco del Gastor)

(cont’d)

SS7

Short tape from Evan H? cont’d –

Non-flamenco – Money magazine edit talk

SS8

Elu de Jerez w/Manolo Flores – en vivo at Penon Fuentes del Rey, Priego de Cordoba, Aug. 1, 1992

(cont’d)

SS9

Cumbre Flamenca – New York City – Aug. 13, 1984 – El Guito, Enrique Morente, Serranito

(cont’d) [?]

SS10

Fernanda de Utrera y Bernarda de Utrera w/_____ – Madrid – March 11, 1992

(cont’d)

SS11

Homage to Fernanda de Utrera y Bernarda de Utrera – Pena Garbanzo [Jerez] – Jerez, May, 1993

(cont’d) – then: Radio Jerez: Enrique Morente en vivo – Aug. 6, 1993 [or June 8, 1993]

SS12 (BZ)

Curro Pinana in New York – with Carlos Pinana, guitarra – con Nadia Marquez, dance

(cont’d) – then, disco info – then party, Arturo Martinez plays, etc.

SS13

Mayte Martin w/_____ – Symphony Space, NYC – Feb. 1, 1998

(cont’d)

SS14

Cumbre Flamenca – New York City – _____ – La Negra, Badajoz, Rafael Romero, Carmona, etc/

(cont’d)

SS15

Bienal Flamenca de Sevilla – 1988 – Paco de Lucia, Luis de Cordoba

(cont’d)

SS16

Flamenco Live – Sevilla – 1992 [Bienal Flamenca?]

(blank)

SS17

Los Jueves de la Bienal – 2 – Sept. 8, 1990

(cont’d)

SS18

Bienal Flamenca de Sevilla – 1988 – Los Montoya [La Familia Montoya]

Bienal Flamenca de Sevilla – 1988 – Lole y Manuel

SS19

La Tona – Bienal Flamenca de Sevilla – 1990

_____

SS20

Vicente Amigo, guitar – Bienal Flamenca de Sevilla – Sept. 17, _____ – Lope de Vega Theater

(cont’d)

SS21

Criaturas – Lope de Vega Theater – Sevilla – Bienal Flamenca de Sevilla _____ – Potito, Familia de Boqueron

(cont’d)

SS22

Cante Live – Sevilla – Bienal Flamenca de Sevilla – 1992

_____

SS23

[Bienal Flamenca de Sevilla] – Sept. 20, 1990

[Bienal Flamenca de Sevilla] – Sept. 20, 1990 – Habichuela

SS24

Miguel Funi, Diego Vargas, David Serva – New York – Jan. 1984

(cont’d)

SS25 (+B)

Agujeta at Sangria, New York City, 1976 –

French radio program on flamenco (Perico del Lunar, etc.)

SS26

Flamenco Gitano – Miguel Funi, Concha Vargas, Jarillo, Familia Fernandez – New York – November, 1994

(cont’d)

SS27

David Serva, Miguel Funi, Diego Vargas in Montreal, Jan. 1984 (via Danny Estulin)

(cont’d)

SS28 (BZ) (+L)

George Thompson [Lesson to BZ] – then to Agujetas at _____ – private, or public show?

Agujetas at _____ – New York – private or public show?

SS29

World Music Institute – Nov. 2000 – La Macanita, Concha Vargas, etc.

(cont’d)

SS30

[Sold commercially] – Chano Lobato – en directo – IV Bienal de Sevilla, 1986, Cine Emperador – Paco del Gastor, guitarra – Cantinas “Ni donde cobija el sol”, Sol “Tu pena y mi pena”, Gran “Este querer tuyo y mio”, Cart

(cont’d) – Mal “Serrana que te olvidara” – Then – Recital, Madrid, Paco de Antequera, guitarra – Tientos – Tangos “Un sabio me leyo el sino” – Then – Festival de Alcala, 1985, Nino Carrion, guitarra – Bul “Un ruido de campana”, Tanguillos “Como quiere que te abra”

SS31 (BZ)

Luis Vargas w/Basilio Georges– Concert – New York Cante Flamenco Festival – AIG, July, 1995 –

(cont’d) – Part 2 – Aurora Reyes w/Basilio Georges, New York Cante Flamenco Festival – AIG – 1995

SS32 (BZ)

Manuel Mairena w/Manuel Morao at New York University (NYU), New York City, May 30, 1995 – Sponsored by Fundacion Antonio Mairena and Instituto Cervantes – [speech by Tomas Pantoja, 25 minutes] – Sol, Tango

(cont’d) – Sig, Tonas, Bul (cancion) “Sevilla”

SS33

Paco Pena con El Sordera, cante – at _____ – [could be recording – surface noise? – Flamenco Puro Live??]

(cont’d)

SS34 [v. SS33 – same]

Paco Pena con El Sordera, cante – at _____ – copy

(cont’d)

SS35 (BZ)

Agujetas w/Enrique Escudero at Casa Patas in Madrid – Oct. 1, 1997

(cont’d)

SS36 (BZ) [v. SS24 – not same?]

Miguel Funi, Diego Vargas, David Serva – Show in New York City – 2nd night – _____

(cont’d)

SS37

Agujetas w/David Serva at _____

(cont’d)

RD1 (+RS)

Flamenco Fury – Jose Greco and Company – _____ – “Cabales del Tablao”, Al de Cadiz, Tango “Vente por la nina”, Cana “Cana de los Cabales”, Rumba “Sol cubanito”, Bul “Fiesta jerezana”, Bul “Lana y fuego”, Tientos “Quererte”, Farruca, Fand, Zapateado, Rumba, Sol

Maitres du Flamenco [?] Vol. 2 – Nino de Almaden w/Roman el Granaino y Pedro Soler* – Mart, Farruca*, Lamento Minero, Bul*, Mal del Prefacio, Cart, “Lamento de la Caleta”, Fand de H*, Mal*, “Aires de Huelva” [Fand de H.], Mart, Mirabras, Sig, Serrana

RD2

Paco Pena – Flamenco Live at Sadler’s Well – Paco Pena, Tito Losada y Manolo Rodriguez, guitars; Manolo Sevilla y El Boqueron [Diego Camacho], cante; Loli Flores, Margarita y Faiquillo, baile – Sol (M.S.), Tientos (El B.), _____; Tarantos, Mart, Al (El B.), Bul, Rumba (todos)

(cont’d)

RD3

Camelamos Naquerar – Mario Maya – [?] _____ –

Persecucion – _____ –

RD4

Flamenco! – Carmen Amaya w/Sabicas – _____ – Bul, Garrotin, Tientos a mayor y menor, Jaleo, Al, Fand de Malaga, Colombiana, Zambra, Rondena, Sevillanas

Queen of the Gypsies – Carmen Amaya w/Sabicas – _____ – Bul, Tarantas, Sig, Sol, Tientos Canasteros, Sol, Sig, Rondena, Sol por Bul, Al

RD5

Flamenco Puro – Manuela Vargas – _____ – poor recording quality – _____

El Flamenco – Manuela Vargas – _____ – poor recording quality –

RG1

Flamenco – Philips 422069-4 -Holland – Pepe Romero, guitar with Chano Lobato, cante, Maria Magdalena, Paco Romero, baile:

Fand de H, Zapateado, Sol, Sevillanas Corralera, Aleg, Bul, Gran, Tanguillo, Bul, Cantinas / (cont’d) Farruca, Sig, Aleg

RG2

Mario Escudero (10” Folkways LP) – Farruca, Gran, Zambra, Rosa [Al in E], Fand, Tarantas, Sevillanas

(Irish music?)

RG3

Flamenco – Esteban de Sanlucar (10” RCA Victor LP) – Sol Gaditanas (Sol de Cadiz), “Castillo de Xauen”, Caracoles, “Panaderos flamencos”, “Marisma del Guadalquivir”, “Aromas del Puerto”, “Moro y gitano”, “Mantilla de Feria”

_____

RG4

Barrio Negro – Tomatito – Nuevos Medios 14588CE – Rumba “Barrio Negro”, Tangos “La voz del tiempo”, Aleg “Canailla”, “Armonias del Romane”,/ Bul “A mi tio Nino Miguel”, Tangos “Caminillo Viejo”, Taranta “Callejon de las canteras”

_____

RG5

Flamenco – Pepe Romero – Mercury SRI75092 (?) – Bul, Fand por Verdiales, Garrotin, Tanguillos, Peteneras,/ “Jota”, “Carabana gitana”, Farruca y Rumba / (cont’d) “Lamento andaluz”, Zorongo

_____

RG6

Atalaya a la Guitarra Espanola – Emilio Prados – Ansonic SALP 1572 – _____

(cont’d.)

RG7

Viva Flamenco – Mario Escudero and Company – “Abril en Sevilla”, Sol, Tientos, Bul, “Panaderos”, Al, Guajira, Sig, Taranta, Mal, Fand

Escudero – Mario Escudero – Montilla _____ – Sol, “Para Amina”, Sevillanas, “Brisas del Genil”, Al, “Mantillas de Feria”, Sig, “Repiquetos Flamencos”, Fand de H., “Almoradi”

RG8

Sabicas Vol. III – Fand, Farruca, Sol por Bul, Taranta,/ Al, Mal, Garrotin, Sol, Minera, Bul

Sabicas Vol. I – Bul, Farruca, Fand, Sol por Bul, Gran, Sol, Sig, Mal, Al in A, Tarantas

RG9

Justo de Badajoz – Montilla – Zapateado, Gran, Al, Fand de H.,/ Zambra, Al, Sol, Taranta, Bul – Luis Maravilla (1953) – Rondena, Mal

Luis Maravilla (1953) (cont’d) – Bul, Al in E, Sig, Sol in A – Esteban de Sanlucar [RCA] (1954) [dup] – Sol, “Castillo de Xauen”, Caracoles, “Panaderos”, Zapateado, Farruca, “Moro y gitano” (Danza Mora); “Mantillas de Feria”

RG10(+S)

De Mi Corazon Al Aire – Vicente Amigo – Sol “De mi corazon al aire”, Bul “Gitana de Lucia”, Gran “Morente”, Aleg “Maestro Sanlucar”, Taranta “Callejon de luna”, Bul “Morao”, Sol “Tio Arango”

La Barberia del Sur – “Dos mil lunas”, “Yo la vi primero”, “Dolores de nina”, “Por boca de la pistola”, “Ay, morena”, “Piel de la Habichuela”, “Al fin, al fin”, Aleg “Apache” (cut off)

RG11

Ramon Montoya – Philharmonia [?] – Rondena, Guajira, Tangos y Tientos, Farruca, Al in A, Minera, Sol, Gran, Tarantas, Sig, Bul [Sol in A], Fand de H.

Nino Ricardo – [French recording] – Serrana, Sol in A, Al in E, Tarantas, Bul, Mal, Zapateado, Sig, Sol, Gran, Tientos, Fand de H.

RG12

Arco de la Rosa – Enrique de Melchor – _____ – _____

[non flamenco] – Arabic [?]

RG13

Guitarra Flamenca – Fernando Sirvent – Audio Fidelity AFSD 5896 – con Manolo Leiva, cante – Sevillanas, Zapateado, Tarantas, “Capricho andaluza”, Zambra, / Bul, Serranas, Sol, Sig “Playera”, Fand de H.

Flamenco Fantastico – Fernando Sirvent – P.I. [Philips International?] 13077 – con Jose Moreno, cante – Sevillanas, Cana, Farruca, Fand de H., Sig, / Bul, Al, Tango, Tientos, Gran

RG14

Rodrigo – _____ – Sol, Tarantas, “Noches en Ronda”, Gran, Fand de H., Bul por Sol, Sig, Bul, Tango de Ronda, “Alameda gitana” [?], Danza Mora, Garrotin

Blank

RG15

Festival Gitana – Sabicas w/Los Trianeros – Bul, Taranto, Verdiales, Tientos, / Sevillanas, Fand, Sol por Bul, Mart, Sig, Fand de H.

Guitars of Passion – Sabicas – [also titled: The Artistry of Sabicas] – Zapateado, Sol de Alcala, Zambra Mora, Al, Fand, Bul, Verdiales, Farruca, Sig

RG16

Ramon Montoya and Manolo de Huelva – _____ – Ramon Montoya: Sol, Sol, Sol*, Sig, Sig, Bul, Tangos, Farruca, Al, Guajira, Al “La Rosa”, Mal

(cont’d) – Ramon Montoya: Minera, Minera, Rondena, Gran, Taranta, Fand – Manolo de Huelva: Sevillas, Al, Sig, Sol, Cana, Sol

RG17

Pitine de Utrera – Arion FARN 1083 (Italy) – Bul, Sig, Sol, Cart, Taranto, Fand, Al Rondena, Guajira

Siroco – Paco de Lucia – _____ – Tango “La Canada”, Rondena “Mi nino Curro”, Al “La Barrosa”, Rumba “Cana de azucar”, / Bul “_____”, Minera “_____”, Tanguillo “_____”; Sol “Gloria al Nino Ricardo”

RG18

Pepe Romero – Philips 9500 512 – _____

(cont’d)

RG19

El Nino de Alicante – Mario Escudero – _____

(cont’d)

RG20

Mundo y Formas de la Guitarra Flamenca – Manolo Sanlucar – CBS 564660 – “Andares gaditanas”, Fand, Colombianas, Taranto, / Bul, “Herencia”, Sevillanas, Al

(cont’d)

RG21

Fantasia Flamenca – Paco de Lucia – Philips 843198 – Taranta “Aires de Linares”, “Mi inspiracion”, Guajiras “Guajiras de Lucia”, “Mantillas de Feria”, Bul “El tempul”, / “Panaderos flamencos”, Gran “Generalife bajo la luna”, Fand “Fiesta en Moguer”, “Lamento minero”, “Celosa” – Then – Manolo Sanlucar: Guajira, Sevillanas

(cont’d) – Paco de Lucia – Zapateado – Then – Recital de Guitarra de Paco de Lucia – _____ – “El vito”, “Mi inspiracion”, Mal, Serrana, Rumba, / “Temas del pueblo”, “Plazuela”, “Zarda de Monty”, “Andalucia”, “Fuente nueva”

RG22

Ramon Montoya – _____

Blank

RG23 [v. RG72]

Paco Pena – CD _____ – Music of Ramon Montoya – _____

(cont’d) – Paco Pena – CD – Music of Nino Ricardo – _____

RG24

Paco Cortes – _____ – Tango “Callejon del Agua”, Aleg“Salitre”, Bul “Aire puro”, Rumba “Corazon Amargo”, Sol por Bul “A mi Solea”, Bul “Ramito de yerbabuena”, Rondena “Barrio de _____”, Gran “_____” – Then – Rogelio Conesa –[previous Gran?]

(cont’d) – Rogelio Conesa – Rumba“Alma del musico”, Bul por Sol “Al son”, Colombiana “Azucar de cana”, Taranta “Los venerables”, Al “Piconera”, Sol “Otros tiempos” – Then – Enrique de Melchor – Cuchichi – “Cuchichi”, “De mi fuente”, “Vivencia” [?]

RG25

Flamenco – Rafael Riqueni – _____ – Taranta, Sol por Bul, Sig, Rumba

(cont’d) – Bul, Minera, Sol, Rondena, Guajira

RG26

[Private compilation] – Bulerias II – Guitarra sin Cante – Nino Ricardo y Melchor de Marchena; Manolo Sanlucar: “Jornaleros”, Serranito: Fiesta en Jerez”, Manuel Cano: “A Serranito”, Paco Cepero: “Suenos en Jerez”, Andres Batista: “Jornaleros” (Los Mejores Guitarras); “Jirones flamencos” [?]; Pedro Bacan; Luis Maravilla (from “Tanidos de Guitarra”)

Pepe Habichuela “Al Aire” (from “A Mandeli”) – “Boabdil”; Paco Pena “Bul Cortas”; _____ “Cantes por Bul”; Nino Miguel “Desde el condado”, “Recuerdos”; Guillermo Rios: “Ventolera”, “Campo andaluz”, “De Jerez a Puerto”; Carlos Lomas: “Chispas”; Manolo Sanlucar: (from “Los Mejores Guitarras)

RG27

Concierto en Flamenco for Guitar and Orchestra – by F. Moreno Torroba – Sabicas, flamenco guitar – Decca DL 10057 – [4 movements, complete] – Then on same record Sabicas plays four solos: Al “Salero gaditano”, Farruca “El Albaicin”, Taranta “Camino de Linares”, Bul “Con un clavel” – Then – Flamenco Puro – Sabicas – MHS 731 – 1 solo – band 1 only

Flaming Flamenco – United Artists UAL 3236 – Sabicas – 10 selections – complete – Then – Flamenco Virtuoso – Sabicas – MHS 764 – “Ritmo granadino”, “Ole mis tres guitarras”, “Taconeo gitano”

RG28

Siroco – Paco de Lucia – Tangos “La Canada”, Rondena “Mi nino Curro”, Al “La barrosa”, Rumba “Cana de azucar”, Bul “El panuelo”, Minera “Callejon del muro”, _____ “Casilda”, Sol “Gloria al Nino Ricardo” [?]

(same)

RG29

Flamencos en Nueva York – Gerardo Nunez – _____ –

(cont’d)

RG30

Paco del Gastor – Nimbus CD

(cont’d)

RG31

Juego de Ninos – Rafael Riqueni – “Monte Pirolo”, _____

_____

RG32

Ziryab – Paco de Lucia – Bul “Soniquete”, Tarantas “Tio Sabas”, “Chick”, Bul “Compadres”, “Ziryab”, “Cancion de amor”, Rumba “Playa de Carina”, Fand “Almonte”

_____

RG33

En Vivo Desde el Teatro Real – Paco de Lucia – _____

The Fantastic Guitars of Sabicas and Escudero – _____ – Colombiana “Colombiana flamenca”, Bul “Fantasia andaluza”, Farruca “Variaciones de Farruca”, _____ “Ritmos malaguenos”, Sol “Gitanos trianeros”, Villancico Flamenco, “El vito”, Aleg “Pregon gaditano”, Gran “Bordones granainos”, Zapateado “Recuerdo a Estampio”

RG34

Paco de Lucia – Sextet – Live in America – _____ – Rondena, Al, Bul, Tanguillos, Tarantas, Bul, _____ “Zyryab”

The Flashing, Glittering Guitar of Juan Serrano – Juan Serrano – _____ – Rumba, Sol, Sig, Bul, Serranas, Petenera, Tanguillos, Zambra, Zapateado, Sevillanas, Tarantas, Al

RG35 (+RS)

Rosas de Amor – Tomatito – _____ – _____

En Vivo – Camaron de la Isla w/Tomatito – _____ – _____

RG36

De Mi Corazon al Aire – Vicente Amigo – _____ – Sol “Reina de Silia”, Bul “Gitano de Lucia”, Gran “Morente”, Taranta “Maestro Sanlucar”, Bul “Callejon de luna”; _____“Morao”, Sol “Tio Arango”

Paco de Lucia – Zyryab – Bul, Taranta, _____, Bul, “Zyryab”, _____, Rumba, “Soniquete (T.S.), “Compadres”, Fand “Almonte”

RG37

Los Mejores Guitarras – Paco de Lucia, Manolo Sanlucar y Andres Batista – _____ – _____

Paco de Lucia En Vivo Desde el Teatro Real – Al, Taranta, Gran, Zapateado, Sol, Fand, Guajira, Rumba

RG38

Todos mis Hijos – Joselero de Moron w/Diego de Moron – _____ 1978 – Bul “Que no puedo con mas”, Mal “Y luego morirme”, Tangos “Que me costo ____ dinero”, Bul por Sol “Nacio de gitano rico”, Sig, / Bul, Al de Cadiz “Todos mis hijos”, Sol de Cadiz, Tangos “Improvisacion por Tangos”

The Music of Spain – National Geographic record _____ – Diego del Gastor (3 bands) – Bul in A, Bul in E, Bul in E

RG39

Flamenco Guitar – Jeronimo Villarino – RCA _____ – [he also sings a Bulerias cuple, “Mari Cruz”, and a Sevillanas] – _____

(non flamenco – Money editor speaks)

RG40

Maya Tape from Zatanias – Juan Maya, Guitar – [not all solos - possibly from juerga and not from recordings]

(cont’d)[?]

RG41

Motivos Andaluces – Manuel Cano – RCA PL 35213 – “Tonadilla”, Peteneras, “Cantos infantiles”, Guajira, “Los olivaritos”, “Cascada (agua)”, Cana y Polo, Tarantas, Tientos, Sig, Bambera – 1-5, Barrios, Villa Lobos [?]

Tesoros de la Guitarra Gitano-Andaluza – Melchor de Marchena – Ariola 82 175H – Sig, Tango, Taranta, Bul por Sol, Farruca, Sol, Jabera y Gran, Al, Rondena, Bul Festeras

RG42

Flamenco Guitar – Jeronimo Villarino – RCA _____ –

_____

RG43

Nino Ricardo – Hispavox record

Nino Ricardo – French record (Le Chant du Monde)

RG44

Felix de Utrera – Sig, Bul, Taranta, Rosa [Al in E], Fand, Sol

“Penny meows and purrs” – to 10’, then blank

RG45

Flamenco por los Cuatro Costados – Ian Davies – _____ – _____ – Al, Tientos, Bul, Gran, Taranto, Rondena, Sevillanas, Sig

Guitarra Flamenca – Antonio Albaicin – _____ – _____ – Taranta, Fand y Mal, Sol, Danza, Gran, Al, Gran, Al – Sig – Mora – Oriental

RG46

Serenata Andaluza – Sabicas con Diego Castellon, Enrique Montoya, Goyo Reyes – Montilla FM 117 – Tientos, Verdiales, Bul, Sol, Farruca

(cont’d) — Saeta – Sig, Al, Fand de H., Tango, Bul

RG47

Paco de Lucia [EP] – then Paco practicing at age 17

El Mundo Flamenco de Paco de Lucia – Pepe de Lucia w/Paco de Lucia y Ramon de Algeciras [?] – _____ – _____

RG48

Mario Escudero – ABC Paramount 396 – _____ – Zapateado, Al, Taranta, Sevillanas, Sol, Bul, Gran, Zapateado, Sig, Guajira

Flaming Flamenco Guitar – Sabicas – UAL 3236 – _____ – Mal, Al, Serrana, Sevillanas, Sol por Bul, / “Gran Jota”, Garrotin, Guajira, Verdiales, Bul

RG49

Amanece el Dia – Quique Paredes – “Amanece el dia”, “Compare rubio”, “Chiringuito”, “La Regla y el Manue” [?], “Yoko Senser”, “Picaro _____”, “Amanacer el dia” – Guitarra Flamenca – Miguel Iven – _____ – Tangos “Triana”, Petenera “A la Nina de los Peines”

(cont’d) – Bul “Altozano”; Zambra “Las cuevas del Sacromonte”, Sol “Son de piedras”; Colombianas “Bienvenida, Dominique”; Taranta por Bul “La diablita”, “Preludio” “La bala de oro”, Rumba “El Poligono”

RG50 (+RS)

Dos Caminos – Serranito – _____ – 1976 – Bul “Luz de luna:”, Sevillanas “Fantasia a Sevilla”, Sol por Bul “A la Perla de Triana”, Cancion “Dos Caminos”, Rumba “Junto al mar”, Gran “Poema a Granada”, Guajira “En la otra orilla”, Campanilleros “Al son de los campanilleros”, Cancion “Pajaro campana”

Lole y Manuel (Third Album) – _____ – 1977 – Bul “Romero verde”, Tango “Oscura plata”, Cancion arabe “Anta Oumri”, Bul “Bul de la plata”, Sol, “Cancion de lirios moraos”, Al “Canto del sal”, Bul “Recuerdo escolar”, Tango “Tango de la pimienta”

RG51

[private compilation from records] – Paco de Lucia – Rondena, Sol, Taranta, Bul “Cepa andaluza’, Fand, Bul “Punta del faro”, Gran

(blank)

RG52(RS?)

_____ – Sabicas with troupe – _____ – Sol por Bul (G), Bul (G), Farruca (G) [3 guitars?] – Bul, Zambra, Sig, Sol, Fand, Al, Tango – then: _____ – Sevillanas, Campanilleros [Villancicos?]

_____ – Juan Serrano with singers – _____ – Bul (El Chaleco?), Al, _____

RG53

The Fantastic Guitars of Sabicas and Escudero – Sabicas, Mario Escudero – _____ – 1958 – Colombiana, Bul, Farruca, Mal, Sol, / Villancico, “Quito” [?], Al, Gran, Zapateado

[non-flamenco] Spanish Jewish music

RG54

Flamenco – Pepe Romero (with singers) – _____ – Sol (G), Sevillanas (with singer and dancer), Al in E (with singer), Bul (with singer), Gran (G), _____

[classical] – Pepe Romero – _____ – _____

RG55

_____ – Gerardo Nunez – Bul, Gran, Tango, Bul, Verdiales, / Tanguillo, Rondena, Sol, Bul

_____ – Rafael Riqueni – _____ – _____

RG56

Escudero at the Y – Mario Escudero at 92nd St. YMCA, NYC – [recording released by Rose Augustine, New York Society of Classical Guitar ?] – Sol, Al in A, Taranta, Mal y Verdial, Nana, “Castillo de Xauen”, Serrana, Zapateado

(cont’d) – Farruca, Rondena, Fand, Guajira – with Luis Vargas, singer: Mart, Guajira, Colombiana, Sol, Bul a Golpe

RG57

Soul of Flamenco – Sabicas – Farruca “Farruca del camino”, Bul “Claveles en flor”, Danza Mora [Zambra] “Maara”, Sig “A Tomas Pavon”, Sol “Por los rincones”, Fand “Orgullo flamenco”, Al “Salinas del Puerto”, Tientos “Tientos del rio”

Sabicas Vol. III – Sabicas – Al “Salinas gaditanas”, Mal “El limonar”, Garrotin “Garrotin flamenco”, Sol “Solera gitana”, Rondena “Gitana”, Bul “Fiesta de Sabicas”, Fand, Farruca “Tema de Farruca”, Sol por Bul “Rumores flamencos”, Tarantas “Aires cartageneras”

RG58

Tauromagia [?] – Manolo Sanlucar – _____ -

Te lo Dice Camaron [not complete?] – Camaron – _____ – “Vente conmigo”, “Borrame de tu memoria”, “Homenaje a Chaqueta”

RG59 (+RS)

La Guitarra de Manolo Sanlucar – Manolo Sanlucar _____ – Guajira “Peinete cubana”, Aleg, Cabales, Garrotin, Tangos Extremenos [Tangos de Extremadura], Serrana, Rondena, Bul “Barrio de San Miguel”, Fand “Canto a Huelva”, Taranot “Sabor minero”

Gran Festival Flamenco – _____ – Rumba, Al (El Tropicano, Charo Lopez), Guajira (Paco de Lucia) (G), Tientos (El Lebrijano w/Paco Cepero, Charo Lopez); Rumba; Fand (Maria Vargas w/Paco Cepero), “Panaderos flamencos” (Paco de Lucia) (G); Rumba

Or:

Gran Festival Flamenco – Edigsa _____ – Rumba (all); Al (El Tropicano, Charo Lopez); Guajira (Paco de Lucia) (G); Tientos (El Lebrijano w/Paco Cepero, Charo Lopez); Rumba (Paco Cepero) (G); / Fand (Maria Vargas w/Paco Cepero); Fand (Camaron); Bul (Maria Vargas w/Paco Cepero); “Panaderos” (Paco de Lucia) (G); _____ (cante; Orillo); Guajiras (Pepin Salazar con Caraestaca y El Farruco, baile)

RG60

Ramon Montoya _____ – [“From Ramon Montoya – Concierto de Arte Clasico Flamenco” – Record 1 – then Ramon Montoya LP] – Sol, Sol, Sol (Amalio Cuenca, 2nd guitar), Sig, Sig, / Bul, Tangos, Farruca, Aleg, Guajiras, La Rosa [Al in E], Mal

Bul, Fand, Sol, Sig, Minera, Mal

RG61 (+SG)

Caprichos de Bohemia – Nino de Pura – _____ – Rumba, Taranta, Bul, Fand, Bul, Tangos, Rumba

( cont’d) – Sol, Colombianas, Al – Then – Performance by Nino de Pura for Giraldillo prize in Sevilla, 1990 – Minera [?], Sol, Al

RG62

Victor Monge “Serranito” – _____ – “Mi vuelta del Rocio”, “Plegaria”, Fantasia – Bul [?] “Raya Royal” [?], Sevillanas “Con el alba”, Aleg “Bahia de Cadiz”, Colombiana “Graciosa”, Rumba “R. de la Habana” [?], Bul, Sol

La Guitarra de El Nino Miguel – Nino Miguel – _____ – Bul “Vals flamenca”, Farruca, Bul, Sevillanas, “Popurri”, Fand de H., Al, Sol, Rumba

RG63

Andres Batista – _____ – Mal “Candelera”, Tarantas, Rumba, Sol, Zapateado, Tientos – Tango, Guajira, Rumba, Fand de H., Garrotin

La Guitarra de Paco Cepero – Rumba “Amuleto”, Farruca, Bul, Gran, Rumba, Tango, Sol, Rumba

RG64

Barrio Negro – Tomatito – _____ – _____

Almoraima – Paco de Lucia – _____ – then – From Fuente y Caudal – Tarantas “Fuente y Caudal”, Bul “Cepa Andaluza”

RG65

Live in America – Paco de Lucia and his sextet/septet – _____ –

(cont’d)

RG 66

“En Fiesta con Federico” – Juan Carmona, guitarra – LP – Rumba, Sol, Bul, Tango, / Colombiana, Bul, Rondena, Rumba [order of sides reversed]

Flamenco – Pepe Romero – Chano Lobato, cante – _____ – (part) –

RG67

Classical Flamenco Guitar – Mario Escudero – con El Pili, Alberto Velez [?] – _____ – _____ [ends with solo Sol, solo Bul]

_____ – Musical Heritage Society [?] – Guajira, Fand de H., _____ (tremolo composition), Serrana, _____

RG68 [v. RG62 – same Nino Miguel recording]

La Guitarra de El Nino Miguel – Nino Miguel – _____ – Bul “Vals flamenca”, Farruca, Bul, Sevillanas, “Popurri”, Fand de H., Al, Sol, Rumba

Diferente [?] – El Nino Miguel – Rumba, Bul, Bul por Rondena, Gran, Taranta, “Vals”, Zapateado, Zambra, Farruca, Rumba

RG69

[Privately made compilation tape?] – Bulerias I – Ramon Montoya: Bul; Diego del Gastor: Bul; Bul; Bul; Bul; Nino Ricardo: Bul “Juncales”; Bul; Bul; Melchor de Marchena: Bul; Sabicas and Escudero: Bul “Fantasia andaluza”; Sabicas: Bul “Aires de Triana” [from Flamenco Puro LP], Sabicas: Bul “Con un clavel” [from Concierto Flamenco LP?]; Sabicas: Bul [from Gypsy Flamenco LP]; Sabicas: Bul “Fiesta de Sabicas” [from The Greatest Flamenco Guitarist LP]; Mario Escudero: Bul “Por Fiesta” [from Ritmos Flamencos LP], Mario Escudero: Bul “Jerezanas” [from Juerga Flamenca LP] [?]

Paco de Lucia y Manolo Sanlucar: Bul; Paco de Lucia: Bul “Cepa andaluza” [from Paco LP, also “Fuente y Caudal” [?]; Paco de Lucia: Bul “Almoraima”; Paco de Lucia: Bul “El tempul” [from Fantasia Flamenca LP], Paco de Lucia: Bul “Plazuela” [from Recital LP], Paco de Lucia: Bul “Punta del Faro” [from Duende Flamenco LP], Paco de Lucia: Bul “Impetu” [from Fabulosa Guitarra LP], Manolo Sanlucar: Bul “Fiesta en Jerez”; Manolo Sanlucar: Bul “Bailaora”; Manolo Sanlucar: Bul “Fuente Vieja”; Serranito: Bul “Albora jerezano”; Paco Cepero: Bul “Suenos en Jerez”

RG70

Rock Encounter – Sabicas (Flamenco Guitarist) and Joe Beck (Rock Guitarist) – _____ – _____

Soy Caminante – Camaron w/_____ – _____ – Bul, Tientos, Fand, Sig, Al, Tangos, Sol, Taranto, Bul, Fand de H., Gran, Sol, Mart

RG71

Almoraima – Paco de Lucia – _____ – Jaleo “Ole”, Sol “Plaza Alta”, Rumba “Rio ancho”, Minera “Llanos de real”, Bul “Almoraima”, Rondena “Cuevas del gato”, Sevillanas “El cobre”, Cantinas “La Perla”

(blank)

RG72

Paco Pena [CD] _____– Ramon Montoya y Nino Ricardo – _____

(cont’d)

RG73

Aluracan – Pedro Bacan – CD _____ – Bul, Sol, Taranta, Sig, Al, Bul

[non-flamenco] – Classical guitar by _____

RG74

Poeta – Vicente Amigo – con Orquesta de Cordoba dirigida por Leo Brouwer – con Jose Parra, Cante, #2, 8, 11 – con Miguel Bose, voz – “Preludio” (Amigo), “Pleamar” (R. Alberti), “Poeta en el puerto” (Amigo), “Flor de la noche” (Amigo), “Poeta en la mar” (Amigo), “Pleamar” (R. Alberti), “Amor dulce muerte” (Amigo), “Entre el clavel y la espada” (R. Alberti), “Nada puede dormir” (Amigo), “Marinera de levante” (Amigo), “El mar de tu sentir” (Amigo), “Como antes, como nunca, como siempre” (Amigo), “Buscando el aliento” (Amigo), Guajira (Amigo), “Poeta en el viento” (Amigo)

[various cuts] – From “Vivencias Imaginadas”: Bul “El mandaito”, Minera “Ventanas al alma”, Fand “Mensaje”, “Querido Metheny” (con Paco de Lucia), Rondena “Sierra” – From “De Mi Corazon al Aire”: Bul “Gitano de Lucia”, Al “Maestro Sanlucar”, Gran “Morente”, Tarantas “Callejon de la luna” (a Juan Habichuela)

RG75

[Private compilation from LPs]: Justo de Badajoz – Montilla _____ – Zapateado de Cadiz, Gran, Rosa, Fand de H., Zambra, Al de Baile, Sol, Tarantas, Bul “Aires de Jerez” – Sabicas: Sol “Passion” [Sol por Bul?], Sig, Gran – Juan Serrano – “Etude #2” – “Rumores del convento” – Sabicas – Bul “La gardenia”

(cont’d) – Sabicas – Bul “La gardenia”, Bul (MGM record), Zambra Mora, Fand “La Rabida, “La cumparsita”, “Recuerdo a Almeria”, “Melodias del norte”, “Malaguena salerosa”, “Virgen de la Macarena”, “Ritmos paraguayanos”, “Las mananitas” – Mario Escudero – Tarantas, “Noches de Cadiz, Sevillanas – Juan Serrano – Caracoles

RG76

Bajo la Luna – Enrique de Melchor – _____ – _____

(cont’d)

RG77

Ramon Montoya – Bul, Fand, Sol, Sig, Tarantas, Minera, Mal, Sol, Gran, Rondena, Guajira – Tango, Farruca, Al (“La Rosa”), Sig

Azahara – Paco Pena w/Tito Losada* – Mal, Al, Gran, Petenera, Sol, Fand de H., Guajira, Tientos, Serrana, Bul*, Tangos*, Sevillanas*

RG78 [v. RG73 – same]

Aluracan – Pedro Bacan – ______ [CD] –

(cont’d)

RG79

Juan Martin – Compilation Tape – Zambra Mora ’88, Tientos ’76, Al “Alegrias de Pablo” ’85, Bul “Bulerias de Metro” ’85, Farruca ’85, Bul ’88, Rumba ’88, Taranta y Fand ’81, Sig “Tres de Mayo” ’85

(cont’d) Rodrigo – “Concierto de Aranjuez” ’84, Rondena ’81, “Las damas de Argel”, ’81

RG80

The Soul of Spain – Guillermo Rios [Bill Glidden] – _____ – _____

(cont’d)

RG81

Flamenco Guitar – Cascabel de Jerez – Dana International DIL 8019 – [all toques composed by M. Serrapi (Nino Ricardo)] – Tanguillos Populares, “Aires de Jerez”, Farruca, Zambra Gitana, Cana, Sevillanas, Tarantas, Fand, Sig, Gran, Al

Nino Ricardo – from 45 rpm record – Odeon/EMI DSOE 16.658, 1965 – Campanilleros, “Rosal flamenco” (Jaleiyo) [Al], Bul “Que Cai” – Then – Argentine Zambas [Sambas] – Eduardo Falu: “Zamba”; Jorge Cafrune y Marito: “_____”; Atahualpa Yupanqui: “Zamba”

RG82

Flamenco de la Frontera – Paco del Gastor – Nimbus CD _____ – “Moron, parte de mi” (con Pepe de Moron, bass and Juan Luis Cabrera, cajon), Al, Sig, Bul, Gran, Sol

(cont’d) – Sol – Then – Alurican – Pedro Bacan – CD _____ – Sol “A Maria Pena”, Taranta “Calle Sinagoga”, Sig “A mi padre Bastian”, Al “Laberinto”, Bul “Madruga”, Bul “Yerbabuena” (con Miguel “El Funi” and Gerard Ben Amza, Palmas, Miguel Alcala, percussion [guitar case])

RG83

Flamenco de la Frontera – Paco del Gastor – Nimbus CD _____ – “Moron, parte de mi” (con Pepe de Moron, bass and Juan Luis Cabrera, cajon), Al, Sig, Bul, Gran, Sol

(cont’d)

RG84

Flamenco Guitar – Juan Martin – Bul, Farruca, Al con Bul, Tarnatas, Tangos Lentos y Rumba, / Rosa

(cont’d) – _____, Sol de Capinetti, Sol “Solea de recuerdo” [“Solea de Ricardo”], Zapateado

RG85

[private compilation] – Sabicas, _____

(cont’d)

RG86

La Fabulosa Guitarra de Paco de Lucia – Philips _____ – _____

Fantasia Flamenca – Paco de Lucia – Philips _____ – _____

RG87

[private compilation] – Paco de Lucia – Rondena, Sol, Taranta, Bul “Cepa andaluza”, Fand, Bul “Punta del faro”, Gran

(blank)

RG88

The Greatest Flamenco Guitarist – Vol. I – Sabicas – _____ – Bul, Farruca, fand, Sol por Bul, Sig, Mal, Al, Taranta

The Greatest Flamenco Guitarist – Vol. II – Sabicas – _____ – Sol, Minera, Bul, sig, Fand, Farruca, Sol por Bul, Tarantas

RG89

Rey del Flamenco – Sabicas – _____ – “Guadalquivir”, Al, Rondena, Tientos, Mal, Zapateado en Re, Sol, Sig, Fand

Rhythms of Spain – Sabicas – _____ – Bul, “Sitio de Zaragoza”, Gran, Bul, Zambra, Fand, Sol, “Cancion”, Sevillanas, Al

RG90

[private compilation] – Paco de Lucia – Miscellaneous cuts – 10’ – Then blank

(cont’d) [?] – tape defective at end

RG91

Castro Marin – Paco de Lucia – _____ – Colombiana “Monasterio de sal”, Bul “Gitanos andaluces”, Fand “Castro Marin”, Sol “Herencia”, Rumba “Convite”, “Palenque”, “Huida”

Solo Quiero Caminar – Paco de Lucia – Philips _____ – Tango “Solo quiero caminar”, Bul “La tumbona”, Rumba “Convite”, Fand de H. “Montino”, Rumba “Chanela”, Colombiana “Monasterio de sal”, Bul “Pinonate”, “Palenque”

RG92

[private compilation] – Paco de Lucia – Copy of Paco tape – Rondena, Sol, Taranta, Bul “Cepa andaluza”, Fand, Bul “Punta del faro”, Gran

Paco de Lucia snippets – Chato de la Isla (1962), Juan Cantero, – May go to study tape of Siguriyas from Fauche

RG93

[private compilation] – Paco de Lucia Stuff – Sol, Bul, Zapateado, Rondena, Tientos, Bul “Gitanos andaluces” (from Castro Marin), Bul “La tumbona”, Taranta, Bul “Cepa andaluza”, Fand,

(cont’d) – Gran

RG94

Duende Flamenco – Paco de Lucia – Philips _____ – Guajira, Sig, Sol, Bul, “Canastera”, Zapateado, Al, Rondena, Farruca, Tientos

Recital Flamenco – Paco de Lucia – Philips _____ – “El vito”, “Mi inspiracion”, “Malaguena de Lecuona”, Rumba “Rumba improvisada”, / “Temas del _____”, Bul “Plazuela”, “Czarda de Monti”, “Andalucia de Lecuona”, _____

RG95

Capricho de Bohemia – Nino de Pura — _____

(cont’d) – Then – possibly Nino de Pura from another “rare” source?

RG96

[private compilation] – Justo de Badajoz: Montilla _____ — Zapateado de Cadiz, Gran, Al por Rosa [Al in E], Fand de H., Zambra “Recuerdo a Cordoba”, Al “Alegrias de baile”, Tarantas, Bul “Aires de Jerez” – Then – Sabicas: _____ — Sol por Bul “Pasion”, Sig, Gran – Then – Juan Serrano: “Etude No. 2”, “Rumores del convento” –

(cont’d) [?] — Sabicas: MGM _____ — Bul, Zambra Mora, Fand “La Rabida”, “La cumparsita”, “Recuerdo a Almeria”, “Melodias del norte”, “Malaguena mexicana”, “La Virgen de la Macarena”, “Ritmos paraguayos”, “Las mananitas” – Then – Mario Escudero: Taranta – Then – Juan Serrano: Caracoles – Then – Sabicas – Tres Guitarras Tiene Sabicas – Clave _____ — “Noches de Cadiz”, [Sevillanas][?]

RG97

_____ — Paco de Lucia, Al DiMeola and John McLaughlin — _____ — _____

(cont’d)

RG98 (+RS)

_____ – El Nino Miguel – _____ – _____ — Then – Pepe Habichuela in concert at _____ — Sol [?], Sig, Tarantas, Bul

_____ — La Marelu w/_____ – _____ – _____

RG99 (+RS)

[recorded from LP’s in Scarsdale – excerpts, skips, noises] Potaje Gitano en Utrera — _____ — [cuts] — Bernarda de Utrera w/Melchor: Bul; Fernanda de Utrera w/Melchor – Fand; Paco Valdepenas w/____: Bul; Bernarda de Utrera w/_____: Bul; Perrate [?] w/_____; Rumba; Fernanda w/Melchor: Sol;

(cont’d) — Carlos Ramos – SMC ____ — _____ — Then – Guitars of Passion – Sabicas – Metro _____ — Bul, Mal y Verdiales, Martinete (_____) – Sig, — Then – Maria Vargas w/Manolo Sanlucar — _____ — ____

RG100 [v. RG68 – same first side]

[Privately made compilation tape?] – Bulerias I – Ramon Montoya: Bul; Diego del Gastor: Bul; Bul; Bul; Bul; Nino Ricardo: Bul “Juncales”; Bul; Bul; Melchor de Marchena: Bul; Sabicas and Escudero: Bul “Fantasia andaluza”; Sabicas: Bul “Aires de Triana” [from Flamenco Puro LP], Sabicas: Bul “Con un clavel” [from Concierto Flamenco LP?]; Sabicas: Bul [from Gypsy Flamenco LP]; Sabicas: Bul “Fiesta de Sabicas” [from The Greatest Flamenco Guitarist LP]; Mario Escudero: Bul “Por Fiesta” [from Ritmos Flamencos LP], Mario Escudero: Bul “Jerezanas” [from Juerga Flamenca LP] [?]

(blank)

RG101 (+S)

La Guitarra de Enrique Melchor – Zafiro ZLF 978 1982 – Tango, Serrana, Bul, Rondena, Rumba,/ Colombianas, Sol, Farruca, Taranto, Bul, Tango

_____ — Juanito Villar w/Paco Cepero — _____ — (“Dimelo”, etc.)

RS1

Raices del Cante – Manuel Avila w/Manolo Sanlucar – Belter 23.050 – Sol Apola de Breva, Sig de Manuel Torre, Taranto, Mal doble de Nino de la Isla, Gran de Chacon,/ Sol – Bul, Murciana, Cart, Minera, Fand de Lucena de Cayetano Muriel “Nino de Cabra”

Cantes Viejos/Temas Nuevos – El Turronero w/Paco Cepero y Enrique de Melchor – Ariola 82185 H – Sol, Romeras, Tangos, Tarantos, Bul,/ Sig, Tientos, Bul, Verdiales, Bamberas

RS2

Pericon de Cadiz w/Melchor de Marchena – Polydor 0519 SFLP – Mal, Cantinas, Sol del Mellizo, Serrana, Bul, ____, Al, Polo, Verdiales, Sol de Paquirri, Mal del Mellizo, Sol por Bul

Cantes de Cadiz – Pericon de Cadiz w/Felix de Utrera – Clave 18-1216S – Bul, Gran y Mal Chica de Mellizo, El Prefacio con la Mal Doble de Mellizo, Tanguillo, Cantina, Al, Bul, Tientos, Sol de Enrique “el Morcilla”, Sig, Romeras, Sol, Peteneras, Guajira por Bul

RS3

En Lebrija – Miguel “El Funi” w/Pedro Pena – Polydor 23 85 022 – Cantinas, Fand, Tango, So, Mart y Debla, Sol por Bul, Fand, Bul, Sig, Romera

Duende y Compas – La Perrata w/Pedro Pena – Polydor 23 85 035 – Bambas, Tangos, Bul, Fand, Sol por Bul,/ Tientos, Bul, Sol, Sig

RS4(+G)

Camaron de la Isla – En Vivo [title?]

Tomatito: Rosas del Amor

RS5

Fosforito w/Paco de Lucia – 4 – Alboreas, Cart, Verdiales, Sig, Fand de Valverde, Saeta Vieja, Sol de Cadiz, Minera, Polo Natural, Javeras [Jaberas], Romera, Mart, Tangos de Cadiz, Minera – Fosforito w/Juan Habichuela – Tangos, Sol

Fosforito w/Paco de Lucia – Belter 22.219 – 1968 – Abandolas, Fand, Minera, Cana, Mal, Tientos, Sol, Tarantas, Verdiales, Fand de Lucena, Petenera, Fand de H.

RS6

Esquema Historica del Cante por Siguiriyas y Soleares – Antonio Mairena w/Enrique de Melchor y Melchor de Marchena – [Sol ?] “Cante de Frijones, Jose Iyanda y Juaniquin”, [Sol ?] “Cantes de Triana”, Sig de Los Puertos, Sol de Alcala, Livianas, Tonas y Livianas, Sol de la Serneta

(cont’d) Sig Tradicional, Bul por Sol, Sig de Triana, Sig Cabales, Sig de Jerez, Sol de Cadiz y los Puertos

RS7

El Cante 1 – El Turronero w/Paco Cepero y El Tato: Tangos; Tina Pavon w/Manolo Dominguez (?): Cantinas; Fosforito w/Paco de Lucia: Sig; Juanito Maravillas w/Vicente el Granaino: Fand; Jose de la Tomasa w/Paco Cepero: Tientos; Fand de Calana: El Cabrero w/_____; El Lebrijano w/Enrique de Melchor y Pedro Bacan: Bul; Pepe Marchena w/Nino Ricardo: Milonga; Antonio Suarez w/Paco Cepero: Mal: Antonio Chacon [otro] w/Paco Cepero: Sol

El Cante 2 – El Lebrijano w/Enrique de Melchor y Pedro Bacan: Tango; Turronero w/Paco Cepero: Fand; El Chozas w/I.C. y Pedro Bacan; Fosforito w/Paco de Lucia: Mal; Juanito Maravillas w/Vicente el Granaino [?]: Gran; El Cabrero w/_____: Sol; Curro Malena w/Parilla: Bul; Porrina de Badajoz w/Porrina, hijo: Tangos Extremenos; Perlita de Huelva w/_____: Fand de H.; Antonio Chacon [otro] w/Paco Cepero: Sig

RS8

Grandeza y Dulzura del Cante – Antonio Mairena w/Habichuela de Tanger y Melchor de Marchena; Juanito Mojama w/Ramon Montoya – Pasarela PSC 5041 – Fundacion Andaluza de Flamenco – Antonio Mairena w/Habichuela de Tanger: Fand; Antonio Mairena w/Melchor de Marchena: Sol de Alcala, Sol de Mellizo, Bul por Sol, Bul / Juanito Mojama w/Ramon Montoya: Tientos, Sol de la Serneta, Gran, Sol de Tio Enrique, Bul, Sol, Caracoles

_____

RS9(FV)

Honores a La Nina de los Peines – Antonio Mairena w/Melchor de Marchena – Sol de Cadiz, Garrotin, Cantinas, Sig a Pastora,/ Bul Cortas, Tientos, Sol a Pastora

(cont’d) – Also Agujetas TV spot [recorded off TV in Madrid, 1972?]

RS10(FV)

Cantes de Cadiz y Los Puertos – Antonion Mairena w/Melchor de Marchena y Enrique de Melchor – Bul, Sig, Tangos, Sol,/ Tanguillos, Sig, Cantinas, Tonas

(cont’d) – Also Glidden at end

RS11(FV)

Joselero de Moron – Vol. 2 – Joselero de Moron w/Diego Torres Amaya [Diego de Moron, Dieguito del Gastor] – Alborea, Sol de la Sierra de Grazalema, Mart,/ Mal, Tangos de Joselero

(cont’d)

RS12(FV)

Cantando a la Libertad – Manuel Gerena w/Juan Habichuela y Pepe Habichuela – Alboreas, Tientos, Nana (Romance), Cantinas y Romera, Rondena, “De la trilla al hombre”, Tona

(cont’d)

RS13

Festival Flamenco Gitano 3 – L+R LR 44.015 – Germany – Diego Pantoja w/Paco de Lucia, Paco Cepero y El Chato Amaya: Rumba; Orillo w/Paco Cepero y Pepin Salazar: Al; La Singla y El Chato Amaya w/Paco de Lucia: Rumba; El Perrate w/Paco Cepero y Pepin Salazar: Sol; Paco de Lucia: Al (G); Orillo con Diego Pantoja y El Perrate w/El Chato Amaya: Fand Natural; Diego Pantoja w/Paco de Lucia, Paco Cepero y El Chato Amaya: Bul; Paco de Lucia: Rondena (G); Diego Pantoja w/Paco Cepero: Fiesta; _____: Fand; El Perrate w/Paco Cepero: Tientos

_____

RS14

Nueva Frontera del Cante de Jerez – Manuel Moneo w/Nino Jero: Sig de Manuel Torre; Diego Rubichi w/Parilla: Sol; Manuel Moneo w/Parilla: Taranto de Manuel Torre; Diego Rubichi: Mart; Manuel Moneo w/Parilla: Fand Natural; Luis de la Chicharrona w/_____: Mal del Mellizo; Nano de Jerez w/_____: Tientos; Mateo Solea w/Parilla: Sig; Juan Moneo w/Moraito Chico (hijo) y Nino Jero: Fiesta por Tango

Nueva Frontera del Cante de Jerez [Nuevas Fronteras del Cante de Jerez] 2 – Diego Rubichi w/R.A.: Bul por Sol; Nano de Jerez w/R.A.: Bul; Paco “el Gasolina” w/R.A.: Bul; Manolito de Malena (age 14) w/R.A. y Antonio Benitez: Bul; Mateo Solea, Nano de Jerez, Paco “el Gasolina”, Manuel Moneo, Juan Moneo w/Nino Jero, Moraito Chico (hijo) y R.A.: Fiestas; Antonio Borrico: Bul

RS15

Fosforito w/Paco de Lucia – Belter 22.219 – Abandolas [Bandola], Fand, Minera, Cana, Mal, Tientos, Sol, Tarantos, Verdiales Fosforeras [Verdiales de Fosforito], Fand de Lucena, Petenera, Fand de H.

_____

RS16

El Chocolate w/Melchor de Marchena – Hisp _____ – Tientos, Serranas, Taranto, Sig, Fand, Romeras, Sol, Tango, Mal del Mellizo, Mirabras, Bul

Viejo Cante Jondo – Agujetas w/Manolo Sanlucar – Columbia _____ – Campanilleros, Mal, Fand, Al, Mart, Sig, Taranto, Fand, Sol, Tientos, Sol por Bul, Sig

RS17

Ven y Sigueme – Un Gitano Llamado Mateo – RCA PL 3582-3 – Rocio Jurado, El Lebrijano, Fernando Silva “El Moro”, Miguel “El Rubio”, Fernando Galvez, La Adela y Loli de Melchor w/Manolo Sanlucar y Enrique de Melchor

(cont’d)

RS18(+G)

Por Derecho – Rocio Jurado – Bul, Taranta, Tango de Triana, Fand Natural Jerezano [?] [Fand Natural de Jerez], Sevillanas Biblicas,/ Romeras Gaditanas [?] [Romeras de Cadiz], Aires de Huelva [Fand de H.], Media Gran, Fand Sevillano [Fand de Sevilla], Cantes de Liviana y Sig de Maria Borrico, Colombianas Festeros, Bamberas de Pastora, Tangos Malaguenos [Tangos de Malaga], Al de Cadiz, Cantes por Sol, Serrana y Verdial, Cantinas Cordobesas [Cantinas de Cordoba], Tona y Sig

Ramon Montoya [guitarra] – Sol, Gran, Tarantas, Sig, Sol por Bul,/ Fand, Sol, Gran, Taranta, Sig, Sol por Bul

RS19

Triana – Montoya – “Montoya”, “Dona golondrina”, “Pastora”, “Ay, ay”, “El Poligano”, “Triana”

Familia Montoya – Bul

El Chocolate w/_____ – _____ – Fand “Noquitarme la botella”, Caracoles “Como reluce”, Tangos “Tango del Piyayo”, Sol “El mundo es un desengano”, Bul “Que alegria me dio a mi”, Fand “Llorando me la encontre”, Sig “Mal fin tenga este sueno mio”, “Jota por Bulerias” “Quisiera volverme yedra”, Fand “Lo besaba y lo mecia”, Mal “Lo que yo por ti daria”

Enrique Morente w/_____ – _____ – Romance “Sentado sobre los muertos”

RS20

Los Hermanos Reyes – _____ – “Maria Cristina”, “Mi Sevilla”, “Sevilla Macarena”, “Cobarde toro de lidia”, “Vereas del camino”

Los Chicos – _____ – “Odio”, “Mala ruina tengas”, “Un hombre”, “Soberana”, “Nosotros dos”, “Como un volcan”, “Calla chiquitin”, “No llores mas” / “Pobrecitos de mis ninos”

Manolo Sanlucar – Azahares – Colombianas “Azahares”, [Bul] “Bailaora”, [Bul] “Toro bravo”, [Bul] “Fuente vieja”, “Tabaco y cana”, “Mare”, “El loco”, [Sevillanas] “Piropos de Abril”

RS21

Fosforito w/_____ – _____ – Fand “Rescolde [?] de carino”, Cart Grande “Lo nuestro”, Farruca “Baila Malena”, Tango “Libre quiero ser”, Sol “Conmigo”, Taranto “Intentare”, Bambera “Desde que te conoci”, Campanilleros “Rico avariento”, Aleg “Clavel mananero”, “La nina de Morabito”, “Maruja Bienvenida”

Casta – Lole y Manuel – _____ – “Desde Cordoba a Sevilla”, “Desnudos”, “Manana blanca”, “Casta”, “Almutamid”, “Aljarafe”, “El balcon”, “Wdesat el ayan [?]”

Enrique Morente w/_____ – _____ – Sol “Con la raiz del querer”, Bul por Sol “Dios teva a mandar un castigo”, Mal “El nino yuntero” [?], Tientos “El carro de mi fortuna” [?]

RS22

Triana, Raiz del Cante – Antonio Mairena w/Melchor de Marchena y Enrique de Melchor – Sol, Sig, Tonas, Romance de la princesa, [Bul?], Sig, Tangos, Giliana

(cont’d)

RS23

Aromo [Aromas del Puerto] – Chano Lobato w/Paco del Gastor – Bul, Al, Cart, Fand, Tangos, Bul al Golpe, Sol, Mal

Chano Lobato Record [?] (cont’d?)

RS24

Fiesta Flamenca – RCA _____ [?] – Nino de Utrera w/Pepe Monreal [?]: Sig, Fand; Pena Hijo w/Sabicas: Mal del Mellizo; Angelillo w/Nino Posadas [?]

(cont’d) – Angelillo w/Nino Posadas; Juanito Montoya w/_____; _____

RS25

La Nina de los Peines [from commercial re-release of 78’s?]: La Nina de los Peines: Sig, Mal (w/Ramon Montoya), Sol, Tarantas, Aleg, Bul, Sig, Peteneras, Tientos, Mal, Garrotin, Tarantas, Farruca, Bul; Sevillanas, Cart, Farruca (w/Luis Molina), Saeta (w/Nino Ricardo), Sig (w/Luis Molina), Sig (w/Nino Ricardo)

From Orfeon Anthology of Cante Flamenco: Maruja Heredia and M.C.: Sevillanas Corraleras; Salvador Pantalon: Bul; David Moreno (guitar), Ramon de Cadiz (dance) [?]: Sevillanas; Antonio el Flecha: Mal del Mellizo; Manolo Caracol w/Nino Ricardo: Tientos; Pepe Culata w/_____: Fand; Caracol w/_____: Campanilleros; Paco Muriana w/Nino de Brillante: Zorongo; _____: Saeta; Antonio Valdepenas: Cart; Manolo Caracol: Serrana; David Moreno (guitar): Petenera; Victoriano _____: Tanguillo Comparsero; Paco Muciano w/Nino de Brillante: Media Gran, Carceleras; M.C. w/Maruja Heredia: Campanilleros; Pepe Culata w/_____: Sig; _____: Tientos; Antonio Pavon (piano flamenco): Al; Rosa Duran: Nana

RS26

Cantes Gitanos de Jerez [Antonio Mairena y el Cante de Jerez] – Antonio Mairena w/Melchor de Marchena y Enrique de Melchor – _____ – _____ – Sig de Frijones, el Marrurro y Cabales, Mal de Manuel Torre, Sol de Frijones, Fiestas por Bul

(cont’d) -Tangos, Bul por Sol; Sig de Paco la Luz, Joaquin la Cherna y Juan Junquera; Cantinas y Romeras

RS27 (+RG)

Sentimiento – El Yunque w/Enrique de Melchor y Manuel Santiago- _____ – _____ – Bul (?), Al, Bul (?), Tango, Fand de H. [?], Gran, Sig, Sol

El Gallo Azul – Gerardo Nunez, guitar – _____ – _____

RS28

De Donde Nace la Cal – [Moron] – _____ – _____ – Antonio Ruiz “el Carpintero” w/_____: Sig; Pepe LeBrun with J.C. Lopez y M.C.: Al; Paco Camacho w/_____ “El Lere”: _____

De Donde Nace la Cal – Vol. 2 – Moron – Dieguito del Gastor, guitarra: Sig; P.D. “El Leri”, guitar: Rondena; J. de la Chica: Jazz – Rumba; M. Morilla, Sol; J.L. Lopez y M.C.: Bul; Juan Morilla: _____; Juan del Gastor, guitarra: Bul

RS29

La Herencia de la Sangre – Fernando Fernandez “Terremoto” [Fernanto Terremoto, hijo] – Nueva Antologia 5T 0548 K – Bul, Fand, Tientos, Sol, Fand, / Sig, Bul, Taranto, Fand, Sig

Flamenco Viejo – Oliver de Triana – Pasarela PSC 2025 – _____ – Sol de Zurraque, Sig de Zurraque, / Sol Apola de Zurraque, Sol Apola de Silverio, Mart de Cagancho

RS30

Caminando – Camaron – Smash cassette – 1990

Camaron por Soleas – Camaron – Smash cassette [?]

RS31

Seleccion Antologica de Cante Flamenco – Fosforito w/Paco de Lucia – Vol. 1, side 2 – Mirabras, Sol de Alcala, Mal del Canario, Fand, Villancico, Debla – Vol. 1, side 1 – Tientos de Frijones, Bul por Sol, Media Gran, Bandolas, Fand del Cerro, Petenera de Medina

Seleccion Antologica de Cante Flamenco – Fosforito w/Paco de Lucia – Vol. 2, side 2 – Taranto, Serrana, Liviana, Tona, Verdial, Cana – Then Jorge Cafrune [non flamenco]

RS32

Antonio Mairena y el Cante de Jerez [Cantes Gitanos de Jerez] – Antonio Mairena w/Melchor de Marchena y Enrique de Melchor – _____ – _____ – Sig de Frijones, el Marrurro y Cabales, Mal de Manuel Torre, Sol de Frijones, Fiestas por Bul, Tangos, Bul por Sol, Sig de Paco La Luz, La Cherna y Juan Junquera

La Historia del Flamenco – Sabicas with singers – Cont’d – Pepe Culata: Sig; Juan Cantero: Tangos de Extremadura; Rondena (G); Manuel Soto “El Sordera”: Bul; Pedro Montolla: Fand; Pepe Culata: Sol por Bul; Rafael Romero: Mal; Garrotin (G);l Manuel Soto “El Sordera”: Sol por Bul; Rafael Romero: Sig; Pepe Culata: Taranta; Camaron de la Isla [Camaron]: Fand; Juan Cantero: Jaleos

RS33

De Sevilla a Cadiz – El Lebrijano w/Nino Ricardo y Paco de Lucia – _____ – 1973 – Sol, Bul, Tientos, Sol por Bul, Al, Bul, Sig, Romera, Tango, Romance

(blank)

RS34

Chants du Forges et de Fetes – Pepa de Benito, Tio Jose el Negro, Juan de los Reyes w/Antonio Jero y M. Carrasco “Jero” [?], con Concha Vargas, baile – _____ – Pepa de Benito: Bul de Noel; Pepa de Benito y Tio Jose el Negro: Romance por Bul, Fand “Ronda de Fandangos”; Tio Jose el Negro: “Mart”; Tio Jose el Negro: Sig; Juan de los Reyes: Sol

(cont’d) – Pepa de Benito: Nana por Soleabuleria; Juan de los Reyes: Mart y Carcelera, Sig; Pepa de Benito: Sol de Utrera; Juan de los Reyes: Romance del Conde Sol; Tio Jose el Negro: Romance “Corrido de la monja”, Fand Natural, Saeta; Pepa de Benito: Bul “Bul romanceada”

RS35

Tapame – Pansequito w/Juan Habichuela y Pepe Habichuela – _____ – Bul, Sol, Rumba, Bul, Fand, Al, Tangos, Tientos, Bul

Tu Eres Viento y Yo Soy Calma – Jimenez Rejano w/J.M. Canizares y Rafael Canizares – _____ – Bul, Colombianas, Taranta, Guajira, Fand de H., Tangos, Bul, Tientos, Fand de Lucena

RS36

Curro Malena – w/Nino Ricardo – _____ – 1969 –

Yunque del Cante Gitano – Curro Malena w/Parilla [?] – _____ – 1971 – _____

RS37

La Puerta Ronda – Jose Menese w/Enrique de Melchor – _____ – Campanilleros, Sol, Tango, Fand, Nana, Mirabras, Sig, Tientos

El Viento Solano – Jose Menese w/Enrique de Melchor – _____ – Bul por Sol, Fand, Sig, Romeras, Rondena, Sol, Tangos, Caracoles

RS38

En Lebrija – Miguel Funi w/_____ – _____ –

Macande – El Potito w/_____ – _____ –

RS39

Pericon de Cadiz w/Felix de Utrera – _____ – Bul “Los pelegrinitos”, Gran y Mal Doble de Mellizo, Tanguillo “El Cordobes”, Cantina y Al, Bul, Tientos, Sol de Enrique el Morcilla, Sig, Romeras, Solea – Petenera, Guajira por Bul

La Perla de Cadiz w/Felix de Utrera y Paco de Antequera [Paco de Algeciras?] – _____ – Al, Bul, Rumba “Por pura casualidad”, Bul “Toros en El Puerto”, Romance por Tientos “Alegrias y Penas de Cordoba”, Bul “Celos, celos”, Bul, Romeras, Fand, Tientos, Rumba “Quien me hizo padecer”

RS40

Manantial Gitano – Curro Malena w/_____ – _____ –

Molino de Viento – El Chozas w/_____ – _____ -

RS41

Asi Es Mi Cante – La Paquera de Jerez w/_____ – _____ – _____ – La Paquera de Jerez w/_____ – _____ – _____

Maestro del Flamenco – La Paquera de Jerez w/_____ – _____ – _____ – Por Bulerias – La Paquera de Jerez w/_____ – _____

RS42

Flamenco [?] – Rocio Jurado w/Paco de Lucia, Paco Cepero, P.A., Felix de Utrera – Alhambra CP 9461 – Fand (w/P. de L. y P.C.); Aleg (w/P.A. y Paco Cepero); Fand (w/P.A. y F. de U.), cancion, Fand de Alosno (w/P.A.); Cantina de Cordoba w/P.A. y P.C.), Fand de H. (w/P.A. y F. de U.), Aleg (w/P.A.), Fand de Almonaster y Verdiales (w/P.A. y P.C.), Tientos – Tangos (w/P.A. y P.C.)

Flamenco – Rocio Jurado – _____ – _____

RS43

La Sallago w/_____ – _____ – _____

Caminos Reales del Cante – Jose Merce – _____ – _____ –

RS44

Embrujo del Cante – Maria Solea w/_____ – _____ – Jerez por Derecho – Manuel Moneo w/_____ – _____

(cont’d) Manuel Moneo w/_____ – _____ – En la Verea – Agujetas – _____ –

RS45

Cien Anos de Cante Gitano – Antonio Mairena w/Melchor de Marchena – _____ – _____

Grandes Estilos Flamencos – Antonio Mairena – Gramusic – Ariola – 1971 – _____

RS46

Jaleo – Curro Fernandez w/Ramon Amador y Manolo Dominguez

Bul [M. Molina], Romance “Romance de la gitana mora”, Sig, Bul por Sol, Alborea, Tango, Sol, Bul [M. Molina]

Recital Flamenco – El Perro de Paterna w/Enrique de Melchor – _____ – Fand de Canalejas, Fand Valientes, Guajiras, Fand de Aznalcollar, Fand de H., Gran y Media Gran, Tientos y Tangos, Caracoles, Fiesta por Bul

RS47

Jose Menese w/Manuel Parilla – _____ – 1971 – Tangos de Malaga, Sol, Tientos, Mart, Polo, Tangos de Pastora, Mal, Sig

Homenaje Flamenco a Miguel Hernandez – Enrique Morente w/Parilla – _____ – Romance, Mal, Mariana, Tientos, Sol, Gran

RS48

Alado Bronce – Jose de la Tomasa w/_____ – _____ –

Ida y Vuelta – Vicente Pradal w/_____ – _____ –

RS49

El Cante de El Lebrijano – El Lebrijano w/Pedro Bacan y Melchor, hijo [Enrique de Melchor] – _____ – Bul “Los presidiarios…”, Bul “Que hermosa”, Sol _____ “Infeliz”; Tango, Bul, Colombiana, _____, Al

El Lebrijano con la Colaboracion Especial de Paco de Lucia – El Lebrijano w/Paco de Lucia – Polydor 2385006 – 1970 – Bul, Mal, Sig, Tientos, Bul por Sol, Fand, Sol, Tona y Liviana, Al, Polo, Bul, _____

RS50

Soy Gitano – Camaron w/Tomatito – _____ – “Soy gitano”, “Casilda de las palomas oscuras”, “Thames y Amnon”, Bul por Sig “Dicen de mi”, / “Luna llama”, “El pez mas viejo del rio”, “Amor de Conuco”, “Nana del caballo grande”

Te Lo Dice Camaron – Camaron w/_____ – _____ – [parte] “Pistola y cuchillo”, “Tu mare Rosa”, “Otra Galaxia”, “Te lo dice Camaron”

RS51 (+RG)

_____ – Manolo Sanlucar – _____ –

(cont’d) – Manolo Sanlucar (end) – Then – _____ – Fernanda de Utrera y Bernarda de Utrera w/_____ – _____

RS52

Nino Gloria w/Nino Ricardo – _____ – _____

Nino de Barbate w/Paco de Lucia – _____ – _____

RS53 (+RD)

Terremoto de Jerez w/_____ – _____ – Sig, Bul, Fand, Sol, Bul, Sol, Fand, Bul por Sol, Sig, [Bul] Fiestas de Jerez

Carmen Amaya – _____ – _____

RS54

History of Cante Flamenco – Manolo Caracol w/Melchor de Marchena – _____ – (Tara tape) – _____

(cont’d)

RS55

Cunas del Cante – Jerez – _____ – El Chozas w/Felix de Utrera: Bul; Manuel Soto “El Sordera” w/Felix de Utrera: Fand de Gloria; Agujetas (padre) w/Felix de Utrera: Sol de Juan Ramirez; Terremoto w/Manuel Morao: Sig; El Sernita [Sernita de Jerez] w/Paco Cepero: Bul por Sol; Antonio Mairena w/Melchor de Marchena: Tangos de Frijones; Borrico w/Paco Cepero: Sol; Agujetas (padre) w/Felix de Utrera: Sig de Manuel Torre; Manuel Soto “El Sordera” w/Felix de Utrera: Bul por Sol; El Sernita [?] w/Paco Antequera: Cabales; El Borrico: Mart; Terremoto w/Manuel Morao: Bul

Flamencos de Jerez – _____ – Manolo Sanlucar, guitarra – El Sordera: Romance; Agujetas: Mart; El Sordera: Fand; Romerito: Sol; Fernando Galvez: Taranto; El Santo, Fernando Galvez y Romerito: Fiesta [Bul], / Terremoto: Sig; Vicente Soto: Sol; Fernando Galvez, Bul; Romerito: _____; Agujeta: Sig; _____: Bul

RS56

Familia Montoya [also: Camaron (1), El Chocolate]: Tango de Piyayo; “El mundo es un desengano”, “Que alegria me dio a mi”, “Llorando me la encontre”, “Mal fin tenga”, “Quiesiera volverme _____”; “No me quitarme”, “Como reluce”

(cont’d)

RS57

El Nino de Almaden w/_____ – Fandango CD? – Mart, Farruca, Minera, Bul, Mal, Cart, “Lamento de la Caleta”, Fand, Mal, “Aires de Huelva’ [Fand de H.], Mart, Mirabras, Sig, “Serenata”, Minera, Fand, _____

Pepe de la Matrona w/_____ – _____ – Sig, Tientos, Petenera, Saeta, Sol, Bul, Mart, Sig, Tientos, Fand, Sig, Sol

RS58

La Leyenda del Tiempo – Camaron w/Tomatito y Raimundo Amador [?] – Philips 63 28 255 – Cancion “La leyenda del tiempo”, Sol por Bul “Romance del amargo”, Bul “Homenaje a Federico”, Aleg “Mi nina se fue al mar”, Cancion “La tarara”, Rumba “Volando voy”, Aleg “Bahia de Cadiz”, Bul “Viejo mundo”, Tangos “Tangos de la sultana”, Nana “Nana del caballo grande”

El Lebrijano w/Paco de Lucia – Polydor Special S 24.55 185 – Bul “Las horquillas de su pelo”, Mal “La flor que amaba”, Sig “Un rayo cayo”, Tientos “Tampoco te he hecho dano”, Bul por Sol “Dice un antiguo refran”, Fand[?], / Sol “Que si te quiere vender”, Tona y Liviana “Ni artista ni joyero lo pueden componer”, Aleg “Tu tienes muy mala mana”, Polo “Tan firme y tan verdadero”, Bul “El panuelo”, Tango “Me lo mandas a decir” – Then – Gregorio Fernandez “El Borrico”w/Paco Cepero: Sol; Manuel Fernandez “El Sernita” w/Paco de Antequera: Cabales; Manuel Soto “El Sordera”w/Paco Cepero: Sig; Manuel Romero “Romerito” w/Paco de Antequera: Sol de Juanini; Manuel Valencia “El Diamante Negro”: Mart; Terremoto de Jerez w/Manuel Morao: Bul; Nino de Amaden w/_____: Mal

RS59

Gitanos de la Plaza – Ramon el Portugues w/_____ – _____ – Then – Potito w/_____ – 3 cantes – from “Macande”

Negra, Si Tu Supieras – Enrique Morente w/_____ – _____

RS60

[non-flamenco] – Canciones Populares Espanoles – Carmen Linares w/_____

(cont’d)

RS61

Nuevo Dia [?] – Lole y Manuel – _____ – “Nuevo dia”, Tangos Canasteros, Bul “Bulerias de la luna”, “Un cuento para mi nino”, “La plazuela y el tardon”, “El rio de mi Sevilla”, “Todo es de color”, “Por primera vez”, “Con hojas de menta”, “Sangre gitana y mora”,

Calle Real – Camaron w/_____ – _____ – “Calle real”; Bul “Con roca de Pedernal”, Bul “Me dieron una ocasion”; “Yo vivo enamorao”, Tango “Y mira que mire y mira”, Fand “En el fondo se clavo”, Bul “Gitana te quiero”, Gran “Que he dejao de quererte” – also included: Performance [in NYC?] – La Conja dances a Solea with recitative; singer may be “Gregorio”; Guitarist is “Enrico” [Enrique Vargas?] – Guitarist plays a Zambra, “Nights of the Alhambra”

RS62

Potro de Rabia y Miel – Camaron – _____ –

Blank

RS63

Potro de Rabia y Miel – Camaron – 1992 – _____

La Paquera – _____ – Then – Modern arrangement, Tango compas – _____ – “Por la manana entre las florecillas…” [“Pa mi Manuela”…], Bul

RS64

The Young Flamencos [?] – various artists – _____ – Antonio Carbonell, La Susi, Enrique Morente, _____

(cont’d) [?]

RS65

New York – Granada [?] [part] – Enrique Morente w/Sabicas – _____ – Taranto [por Rondena], Farruca [?], Mirabras, Sol por Bul [?], Guajira, Fand, Aleg, Tango, Bul (cut)

(cont’d) – Bul (cont’d) – Then – _____ – Agujeta w/Manolo Sanlucar – _____ – Sol, Sol, Sol, Sol, Sol – Then young singer (Potito, Duquende?) w/modern player (Paco? Amigo?) and bass and flute – Bul “Si tu no tienes soniquete…”, _____ (G) [cut]

RS66

[from one record, or private compilation?] – _____ – Pepe Culata: Mart; Jose Menese: Tangos; Curro Mairena: Sig. Cabales; Manolo Caracol: Saeta; Rafael Romero: Cana; Naranjito de Triana: Tangos; El Pele: Sol de Alcala; Nino de Oferna [Osuna ?]: Fand por Sol; Manolo Caracol: Fand; Maruja Heredia y Mari Cela: Sevillana; Manolo Caracol: Bul y Fiestas; Antonio Mairena: Cante de Gilianas; Jose Menese: Tonas: Perro de Paterna: Carceleras

(cont’d) [break occurs earlier] – Terremoto: Sol; Curro Mairena: Bul; Juan el Lebrijano: Bul por Sol [cut]

RS67

End of El Chocolate record [1/3 of tape] – _____ – El Chocolate w/Melchor de Marchena: Fand de H. [?]; Mal [?]; Sol; Sig; Mart

Blank

RS68

El Cante de las Minas – Antonio Pinana w/_____ –

El Cante por Bulerias – El Turronero y Curro Malena w/_____- Taranto, Bul, …Tientos…

RS69

Azotea – Salmarina [Sal Marina] – [complete?] – 8 – Then: Sevillanas – Maria del Monte

(cont’d) – Maria del Monte

RS70

Gran Festival Flamenco – Edigsa _____ – Rumba (all); Al (El Tropicano; Guajira (Paco de Lucia) (G); Tientos (El Lebrijano); Rumba (Paco Cepero) (G); / Fand (Maria Vargas w/Paco Cepero); Fand (Camaron); Bul (Maria Vargas w/Paco Cepero); “Panaderos” (Paco de Lucia) (G); _____ (cante; Orillo); Guajiras (Pepin Salazar con Caraestaca y El Farruco, baile)

Flamenco en el Teatro Real – El Lebrijano w/Enrique de Melchor y Josele Heredia [?] – _____ – Tangos de los arrieros – Cdantinas, Garrotin, Rondena, “Galeras”, Bul por Sol, Colombianas, Peteneras

RS71 [v. RS32]

La Historia del Flamenco – Sabicas with singers – Guajira “El bohio” (G); Pepe Culata: Sig; Juan Cantero: Tangos Extremenos [Tangos de Extremadura]; Manuel Soto “El Sordera”: Bul; Pedro Montolla [Pedro Montoya]: Fand; Pepe Culata: Sol por Bul; Rafael Romero: Mal; Rondena “Nostalgia flamenca” (G)

(cont’d) – Garrotin “Homenaje a Carmen” (G); Manuel Soto “El Sordera”: Sol por Bul; Rafael Romero: Sig; Pepe Culata: Taranta; Camaron de la Isla [Camaron]: Fand; Juan Cantero: Jaleos Extremenos [Jaleos de Extremadura]; Manuel Soto “El Sordera”: Al; El Pili: Sol; _____ : Sig “Los Puertos” (G?)

RS72 [v. RS18]

Por Derecho – Rocio Jurado w/Paco Cepero, Enrique de Melchor y Nino Ricardo – _____ – LP 1 – Bul “Bulerias de Piliya”, Taranta, Tango de Triana, Fand Natural Jerezano [?] [Fand Natural de Jerez], Sevillanas Biblicas,/ Romeras Gaditanas [?] [Romeras de Cadiz], Aires de Huelva [Fand de H.], Media Gran, Fand Sevillano [Fand de Sevilla], Cantes de Liviana y Sig de Maria Borrico

(cont’d) – LP 2 – Colombianas Festeros, Bamberas de Pastora, Tangos Malaguenos [Tangos de Malaga], [Tientos?], Al de Cadiz, Sol “Cantes por Solea”, Serrana y Verdial, Cantinas Cordobesas [Cantinas de Cordoba] [?], Tona y Sig

RS73 (+SS or F)

[not from record] Homenaje a Beni de Cadiz – Various artists – 50’ from 100’ tape – Al (_____ w/_____); _____

Cuatro Veces Veinte Anos – Tia Anica la Pirinaca w/_____ – _____

RS74

Curro Malena – Curro Malena w/Nino Ricardo – Col C. 7041 – (side B) Bul, Sig, Fand, Sol, Bul, / (side A) Sig, Bul por Sol, Sol, Cantinas, Fand, Bul

Lo Mejor de Manuel Mairena w/Nino Ricardo – HN 3912 130 [?] – Romance del Camborio, Aleg, Tangos (w/Melchor de Marchena), Bul Navidenas, Saeta, / Petenera, Sol, Mirabras, Farrucal, Saeta

RS75

[From multiple LP recordings – probably compiled by G. Hollenberg] – _____ – Manolo Vargas w/_____ – Manolo Vargas Hondo – [Verdiales, Sol por Bul, Fand. de H., Sig y Cabales, Sol…. – record changes – Manolo Vargas [?] w/_____ [“Antonio”] – Fand de H. [?] [2 guitars], Fand [?], Fand “…los campos andaluces” (spoken), Fand, Sol – changes to _____ – Manolo Vargas [?] w/Andres Heredia [“Andres”] – Bul, Sol [2 guitars], Tanguillo, Mal, Bul,

(cont’d) – Manolo Vargas Hondo – Aleg [2 guitars] [“Andres”], ….

RS76

El Cante Flamenco de Juan Talega – Vol. 1. – Fods Records C-2089 – SE20 – 1992 – Cante Inedito con la guitarra de Diego del Gastor – Juan Talega w/Diego del Gastor [from cassette] – Sig, Sol, Sig, Sol,

(cont’d) – Sig, Sol, Sig, Sol, Sig, Sig

RS77

El Cante Flamenco de Manolito de Maria – Guitarra: Diego del Gastor y otros [Fernando de Alcala, Eduardo de la Malena, Perico del Lunar– Cantes Gitanos – Primera Epoca – Especial Coleccionista – Fods Records C-2121 – SE 20 – 1993 – Sol de Alcala, Bul, Bul, Bul, Bul, / Sol de Alcala – then: Sol (Manuel Angustias w/_____), Sig (Pepe “El Culata” w/Perico del Lunar)

RS 78 [v. RS18 and RS72 – same?]

Por Derecho – Rocio Jurado – Bul, Taranta, Tango de Triana, Fand Natural Jerezano [?] [Fand Natural de Jerez], Sevillanas Biblicas,/ Romeras Gaditanas [?] [Romeras de Cadiz], Aires de Huelva [Fand de H.], Media Gran, Fand Sevillano [Fand de Sevilla], Cantes de Liviana y Sig de Maria Borrico, Colombianas Festeros, Bamberas de Pastora, Tangos Malaguenos [Tangos de Malaga], Al de Cadiz, Cantes por Sol, Serrana y Verdial, Cantinas Cordobesas [Cantinas de Cordoba], Tona y Sig

Or:

Por Derecho – Rocio Jurado w/Paco Cepero, Enrique de Melchor y Nino Ricardo – _____ – LP 1 – Bul “Bulerias de Piliya”, Taranta, Tango de Triana, Fand Natural Jerezano [?] [Fand Natural de Jerez], Sevillanas Biblicas,/ Romeras Gaditanas [?] [Romeras de Cadiz], Aires de Huelva [Fand de H.], Media Gran, Fand Sevillano [Fand de Sevilla], Cantes de Liviana y Sig de Maria Borrico

(cont’d) – LP 2 – Colombianas Festeros, Bamberas de Pastora, Tangos Malaguenos [Tangos de Malaga], [Tientos?], Al de Cadiz, Sol “Cantes por Solea”, Serrana y Verdial, Cantinas Cordobesas [Cantinas de Cordoba] [?], Tona y Sig

RS79

Flamenco Viejo – La Fernanda de Utrera y La Bernarda de Utrera w/Manolo Dominguez y Jose Luis Postigo – _____ – _____ [Final Bul – cuple by Bernarda, “Envidia…” is cut][Is this the same record as Raza y Compas?]

_____ – Roe – _____ – _____ “Ay viejecita…”, _____

RS80

El Cante Festero de Curro Malena – Curro Malena w/Parilla de Jerez – _____ 1975 – Bul de Cadiz, Tangos, Mirabras, Bul, Romera, Bul

(cont’d) Romance, Tango, Bul, Tango, Villancicos por Bul

RS81

Ole! Flamenco – RCA _____ – 1/2 of tape – [incomplete?] – Pedro Cortes (G): Gran, Farruca, Sol, Zambra; Juanito Valderrama w/Nino Ricardo: Caracoles, Serrana, Fand de H.

RS82

Rafael Romero y el Duende Gitano – Rafael Romero w/Perico del Lunar (hijo) – Movieplay S21.294 – Sig con Cabales, Garrotin, Mal, Sol, / Cana, Mirabras, Jaleo Extremeno [Jaleo de Extremadura], Rondena

Leccion de Cante Flamenco – Juan Varea w/Perico del Lunar (hijo) – Clave 18-1319S – Al, Fand, Campanilleros, Tona y Mart, / Cart, Sig, “Al clavel de Granada”

RS83

Antologia de la Buleria – _____ – Manolito de la Maria, J.R. Pantoja, Perrate, Fernandillo de Moron, Bernarda de Utrera, La Pirinaca de Jerez, Fernanda de Utrera, _____ Calzones, La Bernarda de Utrera, Manuel de Angustias

Bulerias – Olimpo SC 2190 – Parrita: Bul “Primavera”; Jimenez Rejano: Bul “Rio” [?]; Ana Reverte: Bul “Caballo negro”, El Lebrijano: Bul “Los presidiarios”, Jimenez Rejano: Bul “Andalucia”, Andres Lozano: Bul “Lejos de mi”; El Lebrijano: Bul “_____”, Ana Reverte: Bul “_____”, Andres Lozano: Bul “_____”

RS84

Se Hace Camino al Andar – Enrique Morente w/_____ – Clave 18-1342 S – _____

(cont’d)

RS85

Colombianas – Ana Reverte w_____ – _____ –

Ida y Vuelta [Cantes de Ida y Vuelta?] – varios – Rumba (Calixto Sanchez w/Pedro Bacan); Vidalita (Jose de la Tomasa w/Jose Luis Postigo); Colombianas (Jose Menese w/Enrique de Melchor); Rumba (Luis de Cordoba w/Manolo Franco); Milonga (_____ w/Paco del Gastor); Guajira (Chano Lobato [?] w/_____)

RS86 [v. RS49]

El Lebrijano con la Colaboracion Especial de Paco de Lucia – El Lebrijano w/Paco de Lucia – Polydor 2385006 – 1970 – Bul, Mal, Sig, Tientos, Bul por Sol, Fand, Sol, Tona y Liviana, Al, Polo [cut],

(cont’d) – Bul, Tango – Then – Camaron “Rosa Maria”, Pansequito “Sonaba el poeta”w/Gerardo Nunez y Paco Cepero [?]

RS87

[Privately made compilation tape from recordings and tapes] – Fernanda de Utrera w/_____: Fand; ______ w/Joaquin Amador con Manuela Carrasco, baile [from Living Flamenco Anthology tape, with Paco Sevilla’s commentary]: Sol; Bernarda de Utrera w/_____ con El Guito, baile: Fand. Alosneros [Fand de Alosno], Cantinas; Diego Camacho “El Boqueron” w/Pepe Habichuela y Juan Habichuela: Tango, Aleg, Bul, Romeras; Pansequito w/_____ Tango “Por quitarte de mi mente”

El Chocolate w/Rafael Mendiola: Sig de Cagancho, Mart, Sol de Triana; Diego Camacho “El Boqueron” w/R. Amador, con Angelita Vargas, baile: Sol; El Chocolate w/_____: Tarantas, Serranas; Pansequito w/Pepe Habichuela y Juan Habichuela: Bul “No despierte a ese nino”, Bul “Una rosa se murio”, Bul “Herrero”

RS88

[Privately made compilation tape from recordings] – Camaron: Tango, Bul, Bul, Bul “Con roca de pedernal”, Tango “Rosa Maria”, Bul, Bul “Arte y majestad”, Tango “No naqueras mas de mi” – then – Pansequito: Bul “El herrero” – then – Manzanita: “Gitana canastera”, Bul “Si _____”

_____ w/Paco Cepero: Tango, _____, Bul “Curro Romero”; Tango [?]

RS89

Flamenco Vivo – Camaron w/_____ – _____ -

Te lo Dice Camaron – Camaron w/_____ – _____ –

RS90

Homenaje a Terremoto de Jerez – 2 Discos – 546-40-3201-3, 546-40-3202-3 – Disc 1, Side 1 [?] – Terremoto w/_____: Sol “Al infierno que te vayas”; Terremoto: Bul por Sol “Ti tiene que faltar”; Terremoto: Tientos “Me pongo a pregonar”; Terremoto: Sig “De Santiago y Santa Ana”; Terremoto: Bul “No me mires malamente” – Then – Disc 2, Side 1 – M. V. “El Diamante Negro”: Sig “Con que grandes fatigas”; Terremoto: Sol “Remedio no tenga”; El Borrico: Bul por Sol “Mira si soy buen gitano”; Terremoto: Fand “Que la besara en las manos”; Terremoto: Sig “Mira lo que es la ignorancia”

(cont’d) – Disc 2, Side 2 – Manuel Soto “El Sordera” w/._____: Fand de El Gloria “Que llores por mi querer”; Terremoto: Bul “Como si fuera una iglesia”; M.R. Romerito de Jerez: Bul de Nochebuena “Los caminos se hicieron”; Terremoto: Bul “La calle Nueva”, El Borrico: Bul “Mi Virgen de la Merced”; M.F. “El Sernita”: Cabales “Moritos a caballo”; Fiesta por Bul “Fiesta en el Barrio Santiago”; Disc 1, Side 2 – Terremoto: Fand “Ni testigos ni abogados”; Terremoto: Sol “No se que le ha dado”; Terremoto: Sig “Morirme quisiera”; Terremoto: Bul “Como si fuera una iglesia”; Terremoto: Sig “Grandes duquelas las mias”

RS91

[Private compilation tape?] “Super Soleares” – _____

(cont’d)

RS92

Cante Gitano – Nimbus _____ – Maria “La Burra”, Maria Solea, Jose de la Tomasa w/Paco del Gastor y Juan del Gastor – Sol (M. la B.), Tientos (M.S.), Sig (J. de la T.), Tangos (M. la B.), Sol (J. de la T.), Fand (M.S.)

(cont’d) – Cantinas y Al de Cadiz (J. de la T.), Bul (M.S., M. la B., J. de la T.)

RS93

Noches Gitanas en Lebrija – 2 – Luna – _____ – Concha de Lagana, Diego Vargas, Pepa de Benito, Bastian w/Pedro Bacan – Fand (C. de L.), Bul (D.V.), Fand (P. de B.), Sol (D.V.), Bul (P. de B.), Sig (D.V.)

Noches Gitanas en Lebrija – 3 – Solera – Diego Vargas, Ines Bacan, Pedro Bacan, Bastian Bacan, Ines Bacan, Luisa Pena w/Pedro Bacan – Mart (D.V.), “Soleabulerias” [Sol por Bul] (I.B.), Sol (P.B.), Tangos (I.B.), Sig. (B.B.), Fand (P. de B.)

RS94 [same as RS93]

Noches Gitanas en Lebrija – CD – 2 – Luna – _____ – Concha de Lagana, Diego Vargas, Pepa de Benito, Bastian w/Pedro Bacan – Fand (C. de L.), Bul (D.V.), Fand (P. de B.), Sol (D.V.), Bul (P. de B.), Sig (D.V.)

Noches Gitanas en Lebrija – CD – 3 – Solera – Diego Vargas, Ines Bacan, Pedro Bacan, Bastian Bacan, Ines Bacan, Luisa Pena w/Pedro Bacan – Mart (D.V.), “Soleabulerias” [Sol por Bul] (I.B.), Sol (P.B.), Tangos (I.B.), Sig. (B.B.), Fand (P. de B.)

RS95

A Paris – Fernanda de Utrera y Bernarda de Utrera – Paris – Ocana 558642 [2 CD’s] – _____

(cont’d)

RS96 [same as RS95?]

A Paris – Fernanda de Utrera y Bernarda de Utrera – Paris – Ocana 558642 [2 CD’s] – _____

(cont’d)

RS97 [same as RS95 and RS96]

A Paris – Fernanda de Utrera y Bernarda de Utrera – Paris – Ocana 558642 [2 CD’s] – Bul, Sol, Fand, Cantinas del Pinini, Sig, Bul

(cont’d) – Bul, Sol, Bul por Sol, Sig, Bul, Tangos [cut]

RS98

Espagne – L’art du Flamenco – CD _____ – Pepe Albaicin, Curro de Utrera w/Pepe Tranca – Bul, Saeta, Petenera, Cana, Taranto, Sol, Mal, “Improvisacion”, Taranto, Sol de Alcala, Peteneras, Bul, Mal, “Improvisacion”

Juanito Varea w/Nino Ricardo – CD – Fand (w/Paco Aguilera), Fand, Cart, Sol, Al, Zambra (con orquesta), Cancion (con orquesta), Cancion (w/Perico del Lunar), Sig, Fand, “Pasodoble” (w/Perico del Lunar, con orquesta), Milonga (w/Paco Aguilera), Bul (w/Paco Aguilera), Serrana, Al (w/Paco Aguilera) [?]

RS99

La Misma Senda – Fernando Mairena w/Manolo Franco – 2 LPs – _____ – Sol de Alcala, Tientos, Cantinas, Rondenas, / Tanguillo de Alcala, Tarantos, Gran, Livianas

(cont’d) – Sig, Sol de los Puertos, Fand, Mal, Bul por Sol, Peteneras, Tonas

RS100

Juan Cantero w/Paco de Lucia – _____ – _____

(blank)

RS101

_____ [LP] – Pepe Pinto w/Melchor de Marchena [except cut 1, w/Pepe Martinez, cut 7, Fand w/A. Moreno, and cut 9, Sol w/M. de Badajoz

(blank)

RS102

Flamenco – Pepe Romero – Chano Lobato, cante – Maria Magdalena, Paco Romero, baile – _____ – Fand de H., Zapateado, Sol, Sevillanas Corraleras, Al, Bul, Gran, Tanguillos

Bul, Cantinas, Farruca, Sig, Aleg

RS103 [v. RS31]

Tango de Triana, Gran, Bambera, Sig, Bul de Cadiz, Fand de Lucena, Mirabras, Sol de Alcala, Mal del Canario, Fand, Villancicos, Debla, / tientos de Frijones, Bul por Sol, Media Gran, Bandola, Fand, Petenera, Taranta

Fosforito w/Paco de Lucia – Seleccion Antologica de Cante Flamenco – _____ – Taranto de Almeria, Serrana, Livianas, Tona, Verdiales, Cana, Tango, Sol Apola, Caracoles, Sig, Fand de H., Zangano, Al, Tango de Cadiz, Rondenas, Mal de La Trini, Cart Grande, Saeta Antigua de Puente Genil

RS104

Flamenco No. 1 – La Zambra – Philips 13100 L – _____ [recorded live at “La Zambra” in Madrid] – _____

Flamenco No. 2 – La Zambra – Philips 13101L – _____ [recorded live at “La Zambra” in Madrid] – _____

RS105 (v. _____)

Lebrijano w/Paco de Lucia) – _____ –

(cont’d)

RS106

Flamenco Vivo- Jerez – Fiesta y Cante Jondo – Ethnic B6750 [CD] – Moraito Chico y Nino de Periquin*, guitarras – Fiesta por Bul* (Antonio de Malena, Mijita hijo, El Barullo, El Chico, El Torta, Manuel Moneo); Mal (El Torta); Tientos y Tangos (El Torta)

(cont’d) – Sig (M. Moneo), Sol al Golpe (M. Moneo)

RS107

Anthologie Complet du Cante Flamenco – Orfeon – Vol 1 –

Anthologie Complet du Cante Flamenco – Orfeon – Vol 2 –

RS108

Anthologie Complet du Cante Flamenco – Orfeon – Vol 3 -

Anthologie Complet du Cante Flamenco – Orfeon – Vol 4 –

RS109

Anthologie Complet du Cante Flamenco – Orfeon – Vol 5 -

(blank)

RS110

Lomax Collection – Vol 5. – Granada and Seville – Sol (“El Chocolate”); Bul (Pastora Amaya); Sig (Chamorro), Zambras, Bul, Sol (Nino de la Saeta), Tango (Rosa Amaya), / Media Gran, Sevillanas, Tango, Gran

RS111

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 1

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 2

RS112

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 3

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 4

RS113

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 5

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 6

RS114

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 7

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 8

RS115

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 9

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 10

RS116

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 11

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 12

RS117

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 13

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 14

RS118

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 15

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 16

RS119

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 17

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 18

RS120

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 19

Magna Antologia del Cante Flamenco – Vol. 20

RS121 (+RD)

Agujetas and Agujetas, padre – _____ – damaged disc – Agujeta w/David Serva – _____

El Sali and his dance company – _____ – Paco Pena, guitar – _____

RS122

Cuatro Veces Veinte Anos – Tia Anica La Pirinaca w/Diego Carrasco – RCA _____ – Sig “Siempre por los rincones”, Sol “Ni en lo que cobija el sol”, Tientos “En la casita de los pobres”, Bul “Te quise por el pelo”, Bul “Es lo mejor”, Bul “Por usted doy la via”, /

From Ariola record with Parilla de Jerez, guitar: Mart “Por cumplir con Dios”, Sig del Marrurro y [Sig de] el Loco Mateo “Que desgracia es la mia”, Sol de Jerez y [Sol de] Lebrija “Que malina era tu mare”, Bul “Que fatigas tengo”, Then – from RCA record _____ with Diego Carrasco y Paco Cortes, guitarras: Alborea “Guarda lo que es bueno” – Then – from Philips record _____ with Pedro Pena, guitar: Sig “Me pregonaras”, Sol “Forman historia”, Bul “Que disparate”

RS123

Camaron de la Isla w/Paco de Lucia [cross] – Philips 6358004 – Sol, Gran, Tango, Fand, Al in E, Taranto, Fand, Sig, Bul, Tientos [?]

Camaron de la Isla w/Paco de Lucia [orange] – Philips 5565020 – Bul, Tientos, Sig, Fand, Bul por Sol, Tarantos, Tangos, Sol, Fand de H., Bul, Fand, Al

RS124

La Guitarra Gitana y Pura de Paco del Gastor – Discophon SC2292 – _____

Nino de Barbate w/Paco de Lucia y Ramon de Algeciras – Tip 24 36 016 – _____

RS125

La Palabra – Jose Menese w/Manolo Brenes y Enrique de Melchor* – Farruca, Tientos, Guajiras, Tangos, Sig, / Tarantas* , Alboreas, Sol, Cart, Al*

(cont’d)

RS126

[cassette sold privately] – En Lebrija – Miguel Funi w/Paco del Gastor – Polydor _____ 1971 – Alborea “Pa darme mas martirio”, Bul “Tengo un marimonero” – Miguel Funi w/Pedro Pena – Cantinas “La vio el Rey David”, Fand “El pelo negro”, Tangos “Me gusta el verte llorar”, Sol “Con aguita calaera”, Mart – Debla “Convencete a la razon”, Fand “Falsa pa que me besabas”

(cont’d) – Sol por Bul “Ni al ira de un debe”, Bul (cuple) “Quitame el beso de anoche”, Romeras “Debajo de los laureles”; Sig “Siempre por los rincones” – Then – from La Puerta del Cante at Maestranza bullring of Sevilla – Miguel Funi w/Paco del Gastor – Bul al Golpe “Yo me acuerdo de mi padre”

RS127

[Defective recording – may not include all cuts] – En Lebrija – Miguel Funi w/Paco del Gastor – Polydor _____ 1971 – Alborea “Pa darme mas martirio”, Bul “Tengo un marimonero” – Miguel Funi w/Pedro Pena – Cantinas “La vio el Rey David”, Fand “El pelo negro”, Tangos “Me gusta el verte llorar”, Sol “Con aguita calaera”, Mart – Debla “Convencete a la razon”, Fand “Falsa pa que me besabas”, Sol por Bul “Ni al ira de un debe”, Bul (cuple) “Quitame el beso de anoche”, Romeras “Debajo de los laureles”; Sig “Siempre por los rincones”

(cont’d)[?]

RS128

Castillo de Arena – Camaron de la Isla w/Paco de Lucia – Philips _____ – Bul, Taranto, Tango, Sol, Fand, Bul, Tientos, Fand, Gran, Sig

Disco de Oro – Camaron de la Isla w/Paco de Lucia – Philips _____ – Verdiales, Bul, Sol, Fand de H., Tango, Taranto, Fand, Bul, Sol, “Canastera”, Tango

RS129

En Vivo – Camaron de la Isla w/Tomatito – [“de Ricardo Pachon” – is it the same as the usual version?] – Tango, Bul, Sol por Bul, Fand, Al, Tango, Bul, [?]

(cont’d)

RS130

Potro de Rabia y Miel – Camaron w/Tomatito y _____ – “Una rosa pa tu pelo”, “Mi nazareno”, “Se mi partio la barrena”, “Potro de rabia y miel”

(cont’d) – “La primavera”, “Yo vendo pescaito”, “Eres como un laberinto”, “La calle de los lunares”, “Un caballo y una llegua”

RS131

Juventud y Pureza – El Salmonete w/Paco Cepero – EMI 10-C-038-021608 –Sol, Tientos, Fand, Bul por Sol, Mart, Sig, Sol, Al, Bambera, Fand de Cepero

_____ [?]

RS132

Camaron w/Paco de Lucia – Philips _____ 1970 – Sol [“Cada vez que nos miramos”], Gran, Tango, Fand, Bul, Fand, Al, Taranto, Fand, Sig, Bul, Tientos

Camaron w/Paco de Lucia – Philips _____ 1969 – Bul, Tientos, Sig, Fand, Bul por Sol, Taranto, Tango, Fand de H., Bul, Fand, Al

RS133

Arte y Majestad – Carmaron de la Isla w/Paco de Lucia – Philips PH 63 29 166 – Sol, Gran, Sig, Bul, Fand, / Taranto, Fand, Bul, Tango del Titi, Cantinas, Fand de H.

_____ [?]

RS134

Antonio Agujetas w/Manuel Moreno Junquera “Moraito Chico”, 1991 – Tona, Bul, Fand, Sig, Bul por Sol, Taranto

(cont’d) – Sol, Carcelera, Sig, Bul

RS135 [v. RS35 – same]

Tapame – Pansequito w/Juan Habichuela y Pepe Habichuela – _____ – Bul, Sol, Rumba, Bul, Fand, Al, Tangos, Tientos, Bul

Tu Eres Viento y Yo Soy Calma – Jimenez Rejano w/J.M. Canizares y Rafael Canizares – _____ – Bul, Colombianas, Taranta, Guajira, Fand de H., Tangos, Bul, Tientos, Fand de Lucena

RS136 [v. RS129 – same]

En Vivo – Camaron de la Isla w/Tomatito – [“de Ricardo Pachon” – is it the same as the usual version?] – Tango, Bul, Sol por Bul, Fand, Al, Tango, Bul, [?]

(cont’d)

RS137 [v. RS20 – same]

Los Hermanos Reyes – _____ – “Maria Cristina”, “Mi Sevilla”, “Sevilla Macarena”, “Cobarde toro de lidia”, “Vereas del camino” — Los Chicos – _____ – “Odio”, “Mala ruina tengas”, “Un hombre”, “Soberana”, “Nosotros dos”, “Como un volcan”, “Calla chiquitin”, “No llores mas” / “Pobrecitos de mis ninos”– Manolo Sanlucar – Azahares – Colombianas “Azahares”, [Bul] “Bailaora”, [Bul] “Toro bravo”, [Bul] “Fuente vieja”, “Tabaco y cana”, “Mare”, “El loco”, [Sevillanas] “Piropos de Abril”

(cont’d)[?]

RS138 (+RG)

Exponiendo en Sevilla – Romero San Juan – _____ – (Sevillanas) _____

El Gallo Azul – Gerardo Nunez, guitarra – _____ – Bul “Gallo azul”, Gran “La Cartuja”, Tangos “Mi patio”, Bul “Amor de Dios”, Verdiales “Canaveral”, / Tanguillos “Puente de los alunados”, Rondena “Donde duerme la luna”, Sol “Solea, un son eterno”, Bul “Los coros de la Meca”

RS139

Agujetas w/David Serva: Sig, Bul – Then LP “Mairena del Alcor – Festival de Cante Jondo” – Col MCE 825, 1967 – Nino Ricardo, guitarra – Naranjito de Triana w/Nino Ricardo: Carcoles “Como relucen”; Luis Caballero w/Nino Ricardo: Mal “Voy a dejar de quererte”; Antonio Mairena w/Nino Ricardo: Sig “A pasito a paso”; Juan Talega w/Nino Ricardo: Sol “Por la intencion que vas”; Manuel Mairena w/Nino Ricardo: Tango Gitano “Mi mare es una gitana”; Naranjito de Triana w/Nino Ricardo: Peteneras “Nino que en cuero y descalzo”; Bernarda de Utrera w/Nino Ricardo: Bul “Mi sombrero te dira”; Fernanda de Utrera w/Nino Ricardo: Sol “El hablar de la gente”;

(cont’d) – Antonio Mairena, Manuel Mairena y Juan Talega [?]: Mart; Antonio Mairena w/Nino Ricardo: Fiesta por Bul “Un ramito de locura” – Then – Homenaje a La Nina de los Peines – Pepe Pinto w/Nino Ricardo – _____ – Tientos, Fand “Dobles Fandangazos”, Mal, Sol, fand, Bul por Sol, / Sig, Fand, Tientos, Mal, Bul por Sol

RS140

Sevillanas – Sound track recording from Carlos Saura’s film “Sevillanas” – Then – Paco de Lucia at 17 years old (from his first EP) – Guajiras, Bulerias

(cont’d) – De Mi Corazon al Aire – Vicente Amigo – _____ – _____ – Then – Pepe Romero: Jota

RS141

Cante Flamenco – Nimbus CD _____ – Chano Lobato, Gaspar de Utrera, Miguel Funi, El Cabrero, Manuel de Paula w/Paco del Gastor y Juan del Gastor – Al (C.L.), Sol (M. de P.), Tientos (G. de U.), Alborea (M.F.), Bul (M. de P.)

(cont’d) – Bul (G. de U., M.F., El C., C.L.)

RS142 (+RG)

Raza y Compas – Fernanda de Utrera y Bernarda de Utrera w/Manolo Dominguez y Jose Luis Postigo – Bernarda: Bul “La Malena tenia un puertecillo”; Fernanda: Fand “Quiero vivir” “Yo tengo mucho alegria”; Fernanda y Bernarda: Bernarda: Bul “_____ de poner” Fernanda: “Cuando yo me muero”; Fernanda: Bul “Yo no te quiero decirte na”; Bernarda: Taranto; Fernanda: Sol “Que flamenca soy”; Bernarda: Bul por Sol “A los_____”; [final Sig by Fernanda is omitted]

Ramon Montoya: Bul, Fand, Sol, Sig Gitana, Taranta, Minera, Mal, Sol, Gran, Rondena, Guajira, Tangos por mayor y menor, Farruca [?], Al in A [cut]

RS143

Cien Anos Atras [?] [double LP] – _____ – Agujeta w/Manolo Sanlucar – Sol “El panuelo florio”, Sol, Sol “Los ojitos de mi cara”, Sol “A mis ninos”, Sol “Si Triana fuera mia”, Sig “Por Isidro”, Sig “Vueltas al Planeta”, Sig, Sig y Cabal

(cont’d) – Bul “Bulerias de los Santos”, Bul, Bul, Bul, Bul por Sol, Tangos, Tientos, Tangos, Sol “Solea de los Santos”, Fand

RS144

Amina [2 cuts] – Then – El Cante y la Guitarra de Pedro Pena — _____ — Bul al Golpe “Amigos, ya no hay amigos”, Bul “Cantes festeros”, “Coplas de Arcos” “Di Di Ana”, Romance por Sol “Homenaje a Diego del Gastor”,

(cont’d) – [Pedro Pena] – Sol por Bul, Fand de H., Sig – Then – Domenico and others, live perfomance – Then – Paco Pena? — concert segment? – Mal de Lecuona, Zambra Mora “Night of the Alhambra [cut]

RS145 [v. RS90 – same?]

Homenaje a Terremoto de Jerez – 2 Discos – 546-40-3201-3, 546-40-3202-3 – Disc 1, Side 1 [?] – Terremoto w/_____: Sol “Al infierno que te vayas”; Terremoto: Bul por Sol “Ti tiene que faltar”; Terremoto: Tientos “Me pongo a pregonar”; Terremoto: Sig “De Santiago y Santa Ana”; Terremoto: Bul “No me mires malamente” – Then – Disc 2, Side 1 – M.V. “El Diamante Negro”: Sig “Con que grandes fatigas”; Terremoto: Sol “Remedio no tenga”; El Borrico: Bul por Sol “Mira si soy buen gitano”; Terremoto: Fand “Que la besara en las manos”; Terremoto: Sig “Mira lo que es la ignorancia”

(cont’d) – Disc 2, Side 2 – Manuel Soto “El Sordera” w/_____: Fand de El Gloria “Que llores por mi querer”; Terremoto: Bul “Como si fuera una iglesia”; M.R. Romerito de Jerez: Bul de Nochebuena “Los caminos se hicieron”; Terremoto: Bul “La calle Nueva”, El Borrico: Bul “Mi Virgen de la Merced”; M.F. “El Sernita”: Cabales “Moritos a caballo”; Fiesta por Bul “Fiesta en el Barrio Santiago”; Disc 1, Side 2 – Terremoto: Fand “Ni testigos ni abogados”; Terremoto: Sol “No se que le ha dado”; Terremoto: Sig “Morirme quisiera”; Terremoto: Bul “Como si fuera una iglesia”; Terremoto: Sig “Grandes duquelas las mias”

RS146 (+RG) (+L)

_____ — Agujetas w/David Serva, Agujetas el Viejo w/Rafael Alarcon [?] – Then – Dennis Koster [Lesson to BZ]

Flamenco Puro – Sabicas – _____ – _____

RS147

The History of Cante Flamenco – Murray Hill _____ — [from Vergara’s Archivo del Cante Flamenco] – Record 3 – _____

(cont’d) – Record 4 – _____

RS148

Son Tus Ojos Dos Estrellas – Camaron — _____ 1971 – Then – El Mundo Flamenco de Paco de Lucia — _____, Sig

(cont’d) – El Mundo Flamenco de Paco de Lucia – Farruca, Bul “Impetu”, Tango, Guajira, Sol, Bul, Al, Taranto – Then – Al Verte las Flores Lloran — Camaron __ _____ 1971 — _____

RS149

[private compilation] – El Lebrijano w/Paco Cepero, Enrique de Melchor y Pedro Bacan con Charo, baile: Tientos; Bul “Los presidiarios con sus caenas”; El Lebrijano w/Paco de Lucia: Bul; Agujetas w/Parilla: Tango, Tientos, Sig de Manuel Torre; Jose Manzano w/Amador: “Sueno de que tu me quieres”; Tango “Yo siempre te he respetao”; Bul; La Marelu w/Paco Cepero: Bul por Sol “Soy gitana”,

(cont’d) – Rocio Jurado w/_____: Fand de H. “Aires de Huelva”, Colombiana, Tangos de Malaga; Paco de Lucia (G): Farruca, “Fuente y caudal”, “Entre dos aguas”; Tina Pavon w/_____: Al, Bul Festeras de Jerez, Cantinas, Tientos (w/Manolo Dominguez): Paco Pena (G): Al de Cordoba

RS150

Pepe Marchena w/_____ — _____ — _____

Homenaje a Pastora Pavon “La Nina de los Peines” [?] — Pepe Pinto w/Nino Ricardo — _____ — _____

RS151 (plus conversation)

With Agujetas in New York – Listening to record of Agujetas w/Parilla and planning a tablao in New York

(cont’d) — With Agujetas in New York – Listening to “Rutas del Cante Jondo” (Agujetas w/Parilla) and talking

RS152

Antologia del Cante Flamenco (Hispavox) – 1/2 of tape – Mart, Farrcua, Taranto, Mal, Taratnas, Gran, Fand de H.

(blank)

RS153

Al Verte Las Flores Lloran – Camaron w/Paco de Lucia — _____

_____ — Camaron w/Paco de Lucia — _____ — _____

RS154 (+G)

_____ — Fernanda de Utrera y Bernarda de Utrera w/Paco del Gastor — _____ — Bul (Fernanda y Bernarda), Sol (Fernanda), Bul (Bernarda), Sol por Bul (Fernanda), Sig (Bernarda), Bul (Bernarda_____ — Then – Manuel Torre – Sig (2 cuts)

Almoraima – Paco de Lucia — _____ – _____ — Then – Pedro Bacan – Bul

RS155 [v. RS149 – same]

[private compilation] – El Lebrijano w/Paco Cepero, Enrique de Melchor y Pedro Bacan con Charo, baile: Tientos; Bul “Los presidiarios con sus caenas”; El Lebrijano w/Paco de Lucia: Bul; Agujetas w/Parilla: Tango, Tientos, Sig de Manuel Torre; Jose Manzano w/Amador: “Sueno de que tu me quieres”; Tango “Yo siempre te he respetao”; Bul; La Marelu w/Paco Cepero: Bul por Sol “Soy gitana”,

(cont’d) – Rocio Jurado w/_____: Fand de H. “Aires de Huelva”, Colombiana, Tangos de Malaga; Paco de Lucia (G): Farruca, “Fuente y caudal”, “Entre dos aguas”; Tina Pavon w/_____: Al, Bul Festeras de Jerez, Cantinas, Tientos (w/Manolo Dominguez): Paco Pena (G): Al de Cordoba

RS156

Por Bulerias – La Paquera de Jerez w/_____– _____ — _____ — Then – Cuaces de Flamenco – Manuel Soto “El Sordera” w/_____ — _____ — _____

(cont’d) – Then — _____ — Mariana Cornejo w/_____ — _____ — Then – Agujetas w/_____ — _____ — Then – Bulerias de Oro — _____ — _____

RS157 [v. RS92 – same]

Cante Gitano – Nimbus _____ – Maria “La Burra”, Maria Solea, Jose de la Tomasa w/Paco del Gastor y Juan del Gastor – Sol (M. la B.), Tientos (M.S.), Sig (J. de la T.), Tangos (M. la B.), Sol (J. de la T.), Fand (M.S.)

(cont’d) – Cantinas y Al de Cadiz (J. de la T.), Bul (M.S., M. la B., J. de la T.)

RS158 (+G)

[possibly: La Voz Flamenca de Cuquito de Barate w/_____ – _____ “Y por apellido rosa”; “Contrabandista”, “Corre y dale la queja”; — picking up – “Corre y dale la queja”; “Gitana por tu querer”; “Currito”; “Tonadilla nueva”; “Barquillos de canela”; “A llorame” [?]; “Le dijo el tiempo al querer”; “Tronco caduco”; [w/Juan Maya “Marote” [?] y Perico del Lunar, hijo [?] — Sol, Fand, Sig, Fand de H., _____ ]

Soul of Spain – Guillermo Rios – [“Spanish Guitar”] [“Mi Carmela”; “Montana de Ronda”; “Ventolera”; “Rumba de los amores”; “De la Marisma vengo”; “La tardecer”; “Campo andaluz” — [Then -- possibly goes to cante recording above]

RS159 (+I)

Seleccion Antologica de Flamenco [?] — Fosforito w/Paco de Lucia — _____ – _____ [jumps to guitar sections in some cantes] — Then Al Verte las Flores Lloran – Camaron w/Paco de Lucia — _____ — _____ [jumps to guitar sections in some cantes]

_____ [Instruction record] — Paco Pena _____ — Sol, Rumba – Then blank

RS160

Enrique Montoya w/Paco de Lucia — _____ — Tientos “Calle de agua”; Rumba “Despues, despues”; Then – La Llave de Oro de Cante Flamenco – Antonio Mairena w/Melchor de Marchena — _____ — Verdiales, Cana [?], Sig, Mart, Bul, Fand, Sol de Frijones, Taranto, Sol de Alcala, Bul (cut)

(cont’d) – Bul – Then – _____ — Jose Menese [?] w/Enrique de Melchor — _____ — Bul, Taranto, _____

RS78(DS)-1

Nina de los Peines 1 – 78’s from David Serva

(cont’d)

RS78(DS)-2

Nina de los Peines 2 – 78’s from David Serva

(cont’d)

RS78(JK)-3

Manuel Torre, pizarras, from Jay

(cont’d)[?]

RS78(JK)-4

Manuel Torre and Antonio Chacon, from original [open reel] old cante tape of J.K.

Family noise, Menkin [Evelyn Zern] and TV, then blank

RS78-5

Pastora Pavon “La Nina de los Peines”: Saeta, Sig (w/Nino Ricardo), Tangos, Sig, Peteneras, Sol, Sol, Cart, Bul, Gran, Bul por Sol, Fand, Saeta, Sevillanas, Fand, Tangos (w/Manolo de Badajoz), Bul por Sol – Manuel Torre: Sig, Sol (w/Hijo de Salvador);

Manuel Torre (cont’d): Sol (w/Javier Molina), Sig, Petenera (w/Habichuela), Fand (w/M. Borrull); Sig, Bul, Taranto, Sol, Sig, Sol, Campanilleros, Sol, Gran, Sig, Taranto, Sig, Al, Taranto

RS78-6

Gonzalez Collection – Manolo Caracol: Carceleras (w/Moraito de Jerez), Zambra, Fand (w/Paco Aguilera), Bul, Mal (w/Nino Ricardo), “La Rosa”, Fand Nuevo de Marchena (w/Ramon Montoya), Al in A minor, Mal, Serrana y Al, – Juanito Valderrama: Bul (w/Nino Ricardo), Farruca (w/Nino Ricardo); “El emigrante”; “Bolero”, “Pasodoble”, Fand; Fand – Angelillo (w/Habichuela): “El pajarito”, Antonio Pozo: Tango de los peines, Tango espartero; Juan Breva: Mal; Nino de Medina: Garrotin; Emilia Medina: Tango “El lerele”; Tomas Pavon: Mal; Pastora Imperio: Cancion “La pena”; Nino de Cabra: Sol; Nino de Medina: Jota; Nino de las Marianas: Marianas; Antonio Pozo: Farruca, Sevillanas

(cont’d)[?]

RS78-7

D. Antonio Chacon

Juan Breba [Juan Breva]

RS78-8

Flamenco – Granados – Nino Medina w/Ramon Montoya: Petenera; Nina de los Peines w/Luis Molina: Farruca; Isabelita de Jerez w/Manolo de Badajoz: Bul; Tomas Pavon w/Nino Ricardo: Bul por Sol; La Pompi w/Miguel Borrull: Sol; El Gloria: Saeta; Juanito Mojama w/Ramon Montoya: Sig

(cont’d) — Antonio Chacon w/R. Mendoza: Cart; Manuel Torre w/Habichuela: Taranta Clasica; Cayetano Muriel (Nino de Cabra) w/Ramon Montoya: Fand de Lucena; Juan Breva w/Ramon Montoya: Fand Abandolao de Velez; (Jose) Rebollo w/Manolo de Badajoz: Fand de H; La Requejo w/Ramon Montoya: Mal Chaconiana [Mal de Chacon]; Nino de la Isla w/Ramon Montoya: Mal Autentico del Mellizo [Mal del Mellizo]

RS78-9

From Granados – Pastora Pavon “La Nina de los Peines”: Tangos w/Manolo de Badajoz, Peteneras, Al, Sevillanas (w/Paquito Simon), Tangos (w/Melchor de Marchena), Pet, Sig, Bul, Sol de la Serneta, Mal, Fand, Fand de H., Bul por Sol, Sig, Tangos, Bul por Sol, Bul, Bul, Bul, Mal

Pastora Pavon (cont’d) – ends with performance in Sevilla, 1963

RS78-10

Pastora Pavon: Taranta (w/Luis Molina), Saeta, Bul, Sol, Tientos, Cart, Garrotin, Tangos, Bul, Tientos, Tientos, Mal, Tientos, Petenera, Sig

(cont’d)

RS78-11

Zern Collection, Cont’d: Nino de Priego w/Ramon Montoya: Fand, Guajira; Jose Rebollo w/Ramon Montoya: Fand, Fand, Fand, Fand; Nino de Cabra w/Ramon Montoya: Media Gran, Cart, Mal, Tientos; Miguel Borrull (G): Danza Arabe Gitana, Sol “Soleares Serranas”; Manolo de Badajoz (G): Gran, Mal

Sabicas (G) (recorded by Sam Eskin, April 9, 1944 [?]): Danza Mora, Sol, [Mal] “Imitacion de Cepero y Angelillo”, Gran, Tarantas (with singer), Sol (with singer); Fidel Zabal (G) (recorded by Sam Eskin, April 9, 1944): Gran, Sevillanas; Jose Palanca w/Jose Revueltas: Sol, Fand; La Nina Valiente w/Jeronimo Valiente: Fand, Mal

RS78-12

Zern Collection, Cont’d: Cojo Luque w/Ramon Montoya: Cante de Levante, Gran, Taranta; Jeronimo Villarino con Vicente Escudero, baile: Sevillanas, “Baile del molinero”; La Argentinita w/Miguel Borrull: Al, “cancion”; Suite #5 [?]; Canalejas w/Pepe Hurtado: Danza Mora, Sig; La Nina de la Puebla w/Sabicas: Fand, Sol Antiguas; Carbonerillo w/Sabicas: Fand; Carbonerillo y Nino de Utrera w/Sabicas: Fand (cut)

(cont’d): Escacena w/Miguel Borrull: Fand; [Sol][?]; Nino de Museo w/Miguel Borrull: [Sol][?], Fand; La Andalucita con orquesta: Saeta; El Americano w/Miguel Borrull: Guajiras, Bul; Jose Munoz (Pena hijo) w/Ramon Montoya: Mal, Fand; Chaconcito w/Ramon Montoya: Fand, Taranta, Sig, Mal; El Americano w/Ramon Montoya: Milonga, Media Gran

RS78-13

Antologia del Cante Flamenco Antiguo – Nino de Gloria – Pizarras [78 rpm records] – [is this commercial reedition or private compilation?]

(cont’d)

RS78-14

Gonzalez Collection (cont’d) – La Antequerana: Sol; Nino de Cabra: Mal; Imperio Argentina: Tientos, Sevillanas; Chato de Valencia w/R. Bustamante: Sig; Manolo de Badajoz (G): Sol por Rosa, Taranta; – Next tape (1): Angelillo w/Habichuela: Fand; Angelillo w/A. Molina: Por Bul con Fand; Rafael de Jerez w/Nino Ricardo: [Aires Flamencos][?], Fand; Pepe Pinto w/Nino Ricardo: [Al][?]Sol y Fand, Al; El Principe Gitano: Cancion Zambra

Pepe Pinto w/Melchor de Marchena: “Sones catalanes”, Fand; A. Molina [Antonio Molina?] w/M. Vasquez “Sarasate”: Fand, Al; Manolo el Malagueno w/Nino Ricardo: Fand, Fand; Manolo el Malagueno w/Roman el Granaino: Milonga, Fand, Milonga, Fand, Milonga, Media Gran; Juanito Valderrama w/Ramon Montoya: Fand; Juanito Valderrama w/Roman el Granaino: Bul; Juanito Valderrama w/Nino Ricardo: Mart y Fandanguillo; Nino Ricardo (G) con orquesta: Pasodoble con Fand; Nino Olivares w/Nino Ricardo: Media Gran

RS78-15

Juanito Valderrama [is this from a reissue, or from original 78’s?] – w/Manolo de Badajoz: Mal, Fand; w/Bernabe de Moron: Tanguillo, Fand, Fand; w/Esteban de Sanlucar: Fand por Sol, Serrana, Sol, Al, Tientos

_____

RS78-16

Zern Collection – cont’d – Conchita Piquer con orquesta: Zambra cancion; La Andalucita w/Paco Aguilera [?]: Guajira, Media Gran, Al, Mal; Margo (dance) w/Vicente Gomez: Sig; Varo de Luna w/Juan Martinez: Zambra, Bul

(cont’d): Varo de Luna w/Juan Martinez: Sol – Zambra, Bul, Tanguillo, Bul, Farruca, Bul

RS78-17

Gonzalez Collection (cont’d) – La Andalucita w/Nino Ricardo: Sol; Roberto Ximenez (dance) w/Luis Maravilla: Farruca, Zapateado del Perchel; Alejandro Vega (dance) w/Luis Maravilla: Sig; Mal para Bailar (con Ramon de Loja, cante); Nino de Utrera w/Nino Posadas: Bul, Cancion; Nino de Utrera w/Jose Molina: Pregon, Bul; Canalejas de Puerto Real w/Pepe Hurtado: Fand, Campanilleros; Canalejas de Puerto Real w/Nino Ricardo: Cante por Bul, Fand; Canalejas de Puerto Real w/Esteban de Sanlucar: Por Bul, Fand [?]; Chato de Valencia w/Ramon Bustamante: Fand Gitano (Gran) – End of Gonzalez Collection

Zern Collection – beginning – La Nina de los Peines w/Nino Ricardo: Sig, Fand, Sig, Peteneras; La Nina de los Peines w/Ramon Montoya: Sig; Aurelio de Cadiz [Aurelio Selles) w/Ramon Montoya: Bul, Gran, Bul, Mal, Sol, Sig; Cojo Luque w/Ramon Montoya: Gran, Cante de Levante (cut)

RS78-18

From big open reel tape “JK 1” – Antonio Chacon w/Ramon Montoya: Mal, Mal; Antonio Chacon w/Perico del Lunar: Sig, Media Gran, Caracoles, Mirabras; Antonio Chacon w/Ramon Montoya: Sol, Sig, Mal del Mellizo; Manuel Torre w/Miguel Borrull: Bul, Tarantas, Fand (part); Nino de Cabra w/_____: Mal; Manuel Torre w/Miguel Borrull: Sol, Sig

(cont’d): Manuel Torre w/Miguel Borrull: Sig; Nino de Cabra w/_____: Gran; _____: Sol; _____: Mal; Tomas Pavon [?]: Sig; _____: Verdiales; Manuel Torre w/Miguel Borrull: Sig; _____ Mart; Manuel Torre [?]: Sig; _____: Fand de H.; _____: Villancico; Antonio Chacon w/Perico del Lunar: Caracoles, Gran; La Nina de los Peines: Saeta, Mal

RS 78-19

[Is this commercial reedition or private compilation?] – El Nino Gloria (Rafael Ramos Antunez) – _____

Tomas Pavon – _____

RS78-20

Is this commercial reedition or private compilation?] – 3. La Nina de los Peines – 4. Nino Gloria

(cont’d) – 1. Melchor de Marchena – 2. La Nina de los Peines

RS78-21

[cassette accompanying book by Manuel Cano – La Guitarra – Vol. 1 – Manuel Cano [11 cantes]

(cont’d) – [11 cantes]

RS78-22

[cassette accompanying book by Manuel Cano – La Guitarra – Vol. 2 – Manuel Cano [12 cantes]

(cont’d) – [9 cantes]

RS78-23

Old Cante – Part 1 – From Evan Harrar – introductions by Luisa Pohren

Old Cante – Part 2

RS78-24 [v. RS78-1 - same]

Nina de los Peines 1 – 78’s from David Serva

(cont’d)

RS78-25 [v. RS78-2 – same]

Nina de los Peines 2 – 78’s from David Serva

(cont’d)

I1

Paco Sevilla – The Living Flamenco Anthology – Flamenco in Granada

(cont’d)

I2 [v/ I1 – same]

Paco Sevilla – The Living Flamenco Anthology – Flamenco in Granada

(cont’d)

I3

Paco Sevilla – The Living Flamenco Anthology – El Baile por Alegrias

(cont’d)

I4

Paco Sevilla – The Living Flamenco Anthology – Paco de Lucia – Accompanist – Tape M6-
Tarantos (Pepe de Lucia), Bul (Ricardo Mondrego, guitar duet), Sol (Pedro Iturralde, jazz saxophonist?), Sig (Camaron de la Isla), Aleg (Cantinas de Utrera) (Pepa de Utrera), Fand del Gloria (Chato de la Isla), Sol por Bul (El Lebrijano, con Nino Ricardo as other guitarist), Sol de Triana (Fosforito), Nana por Sol (Nino de Barbate), “Amapola” (Ramon de Algeciras as other guitarist), Bul (Pepe de Lucia)

Fand Naturales (El Sevillano), “Tarara” (Bul) (Enrique Montoya), Rumba (Rocio Jurado), “Fantasia Suite” (excerpt) (Al DiMeola, John McLaughlin as other guitarists), Tango (Manuela), Bul (Camaron de la Isla), “Cancion de fuego fatuo” (M. de Falla) (Grupo Dolores), Tango (Grupo Dolores), Al (Juan Ramirez), Bul (Pepe de Lucia)

I5

Paco Sevilla – The Living Flamenco Anthology – The School of Cante of Camaron de la Isla

(cont’d)

I6 (v. I5 – same]

Paco Sevilla – The Living Flamenco Anthology – The School of Cante of Camaron de la Isla

(cont’d)

I7

Paco Sevilla – The Living Flamenco Anthology – Sevillanas

I8

Paco Sevilla – The Living Flamenco Anthology – Ninos y Nanas

(cont’d)

I9 [v. I8 – same]

Paco Sevilla – The Living Flamenco Anthology – Ninos y Nanas

(cont’d)

I10

Paco Sevilla – The Living Flamenco Anthology – The Moron Phenomenon – Bul (Diego), Bul (Diego), Sol (Diego), Sol (La Fernanda de Utrera w/Diego del Gastor), Bul (Diego con Manolo el Poeta), Rumba – Tango (Agustin Rios, Dieguito con Luisa Maravilla, baile), Sol de la Sierra de Grazalema (Joselero w/Diego), Alborea (Joselero w/Diego), Bul de Cadiz (Manolito de la Maria w/Diego), Sol de Alcala (Juan Talega w/Paco Aguilera)

Bul (Diego), Bul (Fernandillo de Moron w/Diego), Al (Dieguito), Tango (Joselero w/Dieguito), Tango (Dieguito), Bul (Dieguito), Bul (Paco del Gastor con _____), Bul (Paco del Gastor), Bul (Bambino w/Paco del Gastor, Juan Maya and Enrique Escudero), Bul (La Fernanda de Utrera w/_____), Bul (Aurora Vargas w/Paco del Gastor), Bul (Paco del Gastor)

I11

Paco Sevilla – The Living Flamenco Anthology – Utrera y Lebrija

(cont’d)

I12

Paco Sevilla – The Living Flamenco Anthology – Modern Gypsy Cantaoras

(cont’d)

I13

Paco Sevilla – The Living Flamenco Anthology – Flamenco Extremeno

(cont’d)

I14

Paco Sevilla – The Living Flamenco Anthology – 20 – Colombianas – El Lebrijano w/Pedro Bacan y Enrique de Melchor; El Lebrijano w/Pedro Bacan y Enrique de Melchor; Luis Vargas w/Mario Escudero [?], Mario Escudero (G), _____, Serranito (G), _____; P.M. w/R.M., C.A. w/M.S., Andres Lozano w/T., Rocio Jurado w/_____, La Susi w/_____, Mariana Cornejo w/_____, Jimenez Rejano w/_____, Jimenez Rejano w/_____, M. de Paula w/_____, Manzanita w/_____

I15

Diego Falsetas I – From Evan Harrar’s compilation of Diego del Gastor’s falsetas

(cont’d)

I16

Diego Falsetas 2 – From Evan Harrar’s compilation of Diego del Gastor’s falsetas

(cont’d)

I17

Diego Falsetas I – From Evan Harrar’s compilation of Diego del Gastor’s falsetas

(cont’d)

I18

Diego Falsetas 2 – From Evan Harrar’s compilation of Diego del Gastor’s falsetas

(cont’d)

I19

Diego Falsetas I – From Evan Harrar’s compilation of Diego del Gastor’s falsetas

(cont’d)

I20

Diego Falsetas 2 – From Evan Harrar’s compilation of Diego del Gastor’s falsetas

(cont’d)

I21

Flamenco Class at AIG – Igor and Manolo Segura – #2

I22

Juan Martin Flamenco Guitar Method – accompanies his book “El Arte Flamenco de la Guitarra”

(cont’d) – incomplete

I23 [v. I22 – same]

Juan Martin Flamenco Guitar Method – accompanies his book “El Arte Flamenco de la Guitarra”

(cont’d) – incomplete

I24

Manolo Sanlucar speaks at Master Class in Roger Smith Hotel, Spring 2001 – Brook Zern translates

(cont’d)

I25

[From Alain Faucher, to accompany his tablature] – Paco de Lucia – Siguiriyas – Anthologies 1 and 2 – Then – Paco Pena – “La Lola” and Tanguillo de Cadiz

(cont’d) [?]

I26 [v. I25 – same]

[From Alain Faucher, to accompany his tablature] – copy – Paco de Lucia – Siguiriyas – Anthologies 1 and 2 – Then – Paco Pena – “La Lola” and Tanguillo de Cadiz

(cont’d) [?]

I27

Tomatito – Flamenco Guitar Instruction Videotape – Bulerias

(cont’d) [?]

I28

Tomatito – Flamenco Guitar Instruction Videotape – Bulerias

(cont’d) [?]

I29 [v. I15 – 120 – same?]

Moron Flamenco Falsetas – Played by Evan Harrar – Bul in A natural, Bul in A major, Bul in A minor

(cont’d) – Bul in A minor, Sol in E

L1

David Serva [to BZ] – Lesson 1 – 1992

(cont’d)

L2

David Serva [to BZ] – Lesson 2 – 1992

(cont’d)

L3

David Serva [to BZ] – Lesson 3 – 1992

(cont’d)

L4

David Serva [to BZ] – Lesson 4 – 1992

(cont’d)

L5

David Serva (to BZ) [1992] – Lesson 5

(cont’d)

L6

David Serva (to BZ) – Lesson 6 – 1992

(cont’d)

L7 MISSING

David Serva (to BZ) – Lesson 7 – 1992

(cont’d)

L8

David Serva – Lesson 8 – 1992

(cont’d)

L9

David Serva [tp BZ] – “Last lesson” – Aug. 28, 1992

(cont’d) – 1/2 of tape

L10

David Serva (to ____) – David – Ensayo

_____

L11

David Serva [Lesson to BZ] – AIG – Feb. 1994

(blank)

L12

David Serva [Lesson to BZ] – Cont’d – Oct. 1994 – ends with Kai showing BZ Alegrias at AIG, Sept. 1994

(blank)

L13

Berglof [Lesson to BZ]

(blank)[?]

L14

Beverly Maher plays Fidel Zabal’s music [Lesson to BZ]

(blank)[?]

L15

George Thompson [“Jorge Marin”][?] [Lesson to BZ] [Turin House]

(cont’d)

L16

Gary Hayes [“Gerardo Alcala”] in Seville [Lesson to BZ]

[talk and dance] – At Muir and Murrell’s [in Sevilla]

L17

Ken Parker – [Lesson to BZ] – AIG – 1986

_____

L18

Dario Cabrel [Lesson to BZ]

(cont’d)

L19

Walt Gressot [Lesson to BZ]

(Cont’d)

L20

Peter Czeisler – Lesson – [Lesson to BZ] [c. 1962] – Tarantas

(cont’d) Jeff Middlebrooks – Lesson – [Lesson (to BZ] [c. 1962]

L21

G. Thompson [George Thompson] – 1978 – [Lesson to BZ] – Hollenberg [George Hollenberg] – 1978 – [Lesson to BZ]

The Bergers [George and Madelne Berger] – [Lesson to BZ]

L22

Antonio [Tony] Madigan – Feb. 20, 1979 – [Lesson to BZ]

[cont’d]

L23

Paul Heffernan [Lesson to BZ]

(cont’d)

L24

Chip Bond [Carlos Lomas] – [Lesson to BZ] [?]

(cont’d)

L25

Walt Gressot [Lesson to BZ]

(cont’d)

L26

Ian at AIG Gallery – [Lesson to BZ] – Jan. 1990 – (3/4 of tape)

_____

L27

Evan Harrar – [Lesson to BZ] – 1986 – 1

(cont’d)

L28

Paul Heffernan [Lesson to BZ]

(cont’d) – to Dario Cabrel (bad recording)

L29

Manolo Baron at AIG [Lesson to BZ][?] – then: Mario Escudero Master Class at AIG

(cont’d) – Mario Escudero Master Class at AIG

L30

Glidden – Lesson [Lesson to BZ] – 1978

(cont’d)[?]

L31

Glidden – [Lesson to BZ] – April 12, 1983

(cont’d)[?]

L32

Glidden – [Lesson to BZ] – Spring, 1978

(cont’d)

L33

Glidden Tues – [Lesson to BZ] – Gran, Gran falseta 1, playing Sol, Bul stuff, Chip [Chip Bond] comes, Glidden Fand/Paco

(cont’d)

L34

Glidden 1978 – 2 – [Lesson to BZ] – Bul, Sol, Tango (in F#) (Bill’s)

(cont’d) – Tarantas (Paco de Lucia)

L35

Glidden [1978] – 2 – [Lesson to BZ] – Taranta, Gran (verse),

George Hollenberg – [Lesson to BZ] – Perico del Lunar, hijo

L36

Glidden – 1986 – [Lesson to BZ] – 1/2 – Fand (and copla)

_____

L37

Glidden – 1983 – Lesson – [Lesson to BZ]

_____

L38

Glidden – First time – [Lesson to BZ] [1978] [?]

(cont’d)

L39

Glidden – Dec. 1987 [Lesson to BZ]

_____

L40

Glidden – [Lesson to BZ] – 1978

(cont’d) – Zapateado en Re, Bul (Maya), ends 20’

L41

Glidden – [Lesson to BZ]

(cont’d) – Heffernan [Lesson to BZ] after 10’

L42

Glidden – [Lesson to BZ] – Falseta, Maya, Paco

(cont’d)

L43

Glidden Wed. – [Lesson to BZ]

[cont’d]

L44

Glidden 1984 [Lesson to BZ] – Sol

(cont’d) – Jaleo in Ab, Bul in E

L45

Glidden Thursday – [Lesson to BZ] – Sol, Gran

L46

Koster [Lesson to BZ][?]

(cont’d)

L47

Dennis Koster at AIG – [Lesson to BZ] – Sabicas’ Tarantas, Sol, etc.

(cont’d) – also Roberto Reyes

L48

Osuna tape [Antonio Osuna] – [Lesson to BZ] – 1965 – [copied from small open reel tape] – 1/2 of Osuna tape

(cont’d)

L49

Basilio Georges [Lesson to BZ]

_____

L50

Juanito del Gastor [Juan del Gastor] – [Lesson to BZ] – 1972

(cont’d)

L51

Diego del Gastor – [Lesson to BZ]

(cont’d)

L52

Diego del Gastor – [Lesson to BZ] – Lesson with Diego – Sig

(cont’d) – Sig, Al

L53

Agustin Rios – [Lesson to BZ] [1969] – 5’ blank, then Augustine Bul to 55’, Sig 55-62’, talk (Paco Ortiz) 62’ to end

Ken Antoine – [Lesson to BZ] [1969]

L54

Diego Lesson to Mac King

_____

L55

Bob – Moron [Lesson to BZ] – [c. 1965] [copied from small open reel tape]

(cont’d)

L56

Terry Toney [Lesson to BZ] [copied from open reel tape]

(cont’d)

L57

[M99(1)] Diego del Gastor [Lesson to BZ] – 1/2 this side

blank?

L58

[M99 (7)] – Diego [Lesson to BZ] – copy

(cont’d)

L59

Juanito del Gastor [Lesson to BZ] [v. 52 – same?] – copied to M99(12) – also: Finca noise

(cont’d)

L60

Adolfo Timuat [Lesson to BZ] – Sig (1/4 of tape)

_____

L61

Dennis Koster [Lesson to BZ] – 1/2 side 1 only

_____

L62

Evan Harrar [Lesson to BZ] – II

_____

L63(+I)

Glidden [Lesson to BZ] – Dec. 1978

Paco Pena Instruction Record

L64

Ted Bakewell [Lesson to BZ] – Moron stuff

(cont’d.)

L65

Carnes [Lesson to BZ] – 1965 [?] – [Transcribed from open reel tape]

(cont’d)

L66

Carnes [Lesson to BZ] – [1965][?] – [Transcribed from open reel tape]

(cont’d)

L67 [Same as L53?]

[M99-15] – Agustin Rios – 1969 [?] – NY [?]

(cont’d)

L68

Victor Kolstee [to BZ] – c. 1977

Blank

L69 (+B)

(copy) Pepe Tranca [to BZ] [in Granada] – 1978

Ronda Festival (tape of Radio broadcast) – Pansequito w/Tomatito, Camaron w/Tomatito

L70

Gary Hayes [Gerardo Alcala] [to BZ] / Glidden [to BZ]

(cont’d)

L71

Ian Banks [to BZ] at AIG – Feb. 1988

(cont’d)

L72 (+RG)

Basilio Georges [to BZ] – Paco Bulerias falseta

Paco de Lucia – Bulerias

L73

[M99 (8)] Agustin Rios [to BZ] – Anoche – Sig…

(cont’d) – 1/3 of this side

L74 – Walt Gressot [to BZ] – 2

(cont’d)

L75 (Same as L ___)

[M99 (25)] – copy – Agustin [to BZ]

(cont’d)

L76

Brook Zern [Lesson to Marty Itzler][?] – Bul [basic compas and falsetas] 1/2 of tape

[spoken] Flamenco Book information [in Spanish store] – Flamenco dance step information [Murrell W. to B.Z]

L77 (+J)

[Same as L-46] [?] – Osuna tape [Antonio Osuna] – [Lesson to BZ] – 1965 – [copied from small open reel tape] – 1/2 of Osuna tape

Paco del Gastor

L78 (+RS)

[Same as L-46][?] – Osuna tape [Antonio Osuna] – [Lesson to BZ] – 1965 – [copied from small open reel tape] – 1/2 of Osuna tape

Camaron – Rosa Maria

L79 (same as L___)

[M99(2)] – Diego del Gastor [Lesson to BZ]

(cont’d) – 1/2 of tape

L80

David Serva [Lesson to BZ] – March, 1995 – last 10’ blank

Blank

L81

Paul M. [?] [Lesson to BZ] – Paco de Lucia material – Tony David in background – 2/3 of tape

Blank

L82

Arnie, John, Phil, Mike [Lessons to BZ][?] – in Spain, c. 1972 –

(cont’d) – Roberto Reyes [in NY], Phil [Wohlstetter] [in NY]

L83 [v. L56 – same?]

Terry Toney [Lesson to BZ] – from big tape

(cont’d) – first 1/3 of tape

L84 [v. L__ - same]

Diego [Lesson to BZ] [original] – copied to M99(2)

(cont’d)

L85 [v. L__ - same]

Diego [Lesson to BZ] [original] – copied to M99(7)

(cont’d)

L86 – [v. L73 - same]

Agustin – Anoche – copied to M99(8) – Sig

(cont’d)

L87 – [v. L__ - same]

Agustin Rios – [original] – copied to M99(19)

(cont’d)

L88 – [v. L75 - same]

Agustin – copied to M99(25)

(cont’d)

L89 – [v. L__ - same]

Diego [Lesson to BZ] – copied to M99(1) – then Dieguito playing – copied to M99(5)

(cont’d) – Dieguito playing – copied to M99(5)

L90

Jared Walker [lesson to BZ] – Solea of Pepe Habichuela – from Japanese book of flamenco transcriptions

L91

David Serva [lesson to BZ] – from Distele tape –

(cont’d)

L92 [v. L104 – first part]

Diego [Lessons to Evan Harrar] – II – _____

(cont’d)

L93

Dennis Koster [Lesson to BZ] – at AIG – Sevillanas, Al, Bul, [rasgueado from Impetu], Al

Non flamencoc – Lou Reed – Growing Up in Public

L94

Diego [Lesson to BZ] – BASF 120’ tape – [has it been recopied???]

(cont’d)

L95

Basilio Georges [Lesson to BZ] – Paco de Lucia’s Sol “Gloria al Nino Ricardo”

blank

L96

Pepe Tranca [Lesson to BZ] – Granada, 1978

(cont’d) – Pepe Tranca [Lesson to BZ] – Granada, 1978 – Then – on radio, taped Ronda Festival – Pansequito w/Tomatito: _____; Camaron w/Tomatito: Tango, Bul – Then Chip Bond [Carlos Lomas] – Bul and conversation

L97 [v. L56 – same]

[copy][?] – Terry Toney [Lesson to BZ] [copied from open reel tape]

(cont’d)

L99

Basilio Georges [Lesson to BZ] – in hallway at AIG – Paco Cepero Bulerias – 5 minutes

(blank)

L100

Bill Glidden [Lesson to BZ] – 1986 –

Igor [Enrique Vargas] – Lesson to BZ – Lesson #9

L101

David Serva [Lesson to BZ] – AIG – (videotaped) – Dec. 1996

(blank)

L102 [v. L59 - same]

[M99(12)[ Juanito del Gastor [Lesson to BZ) – also: Finca noise

(cont’d)

L103 [v. L86, L98 – same?]

Terry Toney [Lesson to BZ] – from tapes

Bill Glidden [Lesson to BZ] – Jan. 1981

L104 [v. L92 – second part]

Diego del Gastor [Lessons to Evan Harrar] – I –

(cont’d)

L105

Arturo Martinez [Lesson to BZ] – November 20, 1996 – at AIG

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [Lesson to BZ] at AIG – Then Ian Banks [Lesson to BZ] at AIG

L106

Pedro Cortes [Lesson to BZ] – his published Alegrias “Cruzando el charco”, etc.

(blank)

L107 (+RS)

Bill Glidden [Lesson to BZ] – 1981

Camaron w/Paco de Lucia – several cuts – badly recorded

L108

Bill Glidden [Lesson to BZ] – Bul, Gran, Sol – 2/3 of tape

Non-flamenco: Cecca [Francesca Zern, 8 years old] reads poems about the colors from “Hailstones and Halibut Bones”, sings, and reads “Mad Libs” – May 8, 1977

L109

Ian Banks and Ted Bakewell [Lesson to BZ] – at Ian’s

(cont’d)

L110

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – I – Bul

(cont’d) – Sig – also – Filipino [Adolfo Timuat] 3-finger picado

L111

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – II

(cont’d)

L112

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – III

(cont’d)

L113

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – IV – includes Gran

(cont’d)

L114

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – V – Rasgueado technique – Rondena tuning – Fand

(cont’d)

L115

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – VI

(cont’d)

L116

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – VII – [has some of Paco de Lucia’s record Fuente y Caudal – then to Tarantas lesson

(cont’d) – Al, Tientos I, Bul

L117

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – VIII – Al, Tarantas to beginning A;

(cont’d)

L118

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – IX – 1/2 Taranta, 1/2 Al in Em

(cont’d) Fand [?] – Taranta [from Fantasia Flamenca?]

(cont’d)

L119

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – IX (cont’d) – Bul

(blank)

L120

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – X

(cont’d)

L121

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – XI – Bul, Taranta, Gran

(cont’d) – Fand (1/3 of tape)

L122

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – XII – miscellaneous and Rondena

(cont’d)

L123

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – XIII

(cont’d)

L124

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – XIV – Miscellaneous

(cont’d)

L125

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – July

(cont’d) [?]

L126

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – Igor again – #1 – 1992

(cont’d)

L127 [v. L126 – same]

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – (copy) – Igor again #1 – 1992

(cont’d)

L128

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – Igor again #2 – [1992] – includes Vicente Amigo Solea introduction and Bulerias introduction

(cont’d) – ends with Paco del Gastor Bulerias falseta

L129

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – [copy] – Igor again #2 – [1992] – includes Vicente Amigo Solea introduction and Bulerias introduction

(cont’d) – ends with Paco del Gastor Bulerias falseta

L130

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – April, 1993 – Bul, etc.

(cont’d) [?]

L131

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – Lessons, Igor

(cont’d) – Vicente Amigo

L132

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – 1993 – scratch track – ends with Amigo’s Bulerias introduction

(cont’d) [?]

L133

Igor [Enrique Vargas] [lesson to BZ] – Video Lesson 1 – AIG – June 23

(cont’d) [?]

L134

David Serva [Lesson to BZ] – at Conil, Spain – Al, Sol [starts after 10’ of discos information]

Kai at AIG – 5’ – Al – Then – discos information

L135

Steve Kahn [Lesson to BZ] – at AIG – bad recording

(blank?)

L136

Steve Kahn [Lesson to BZ] – at AIG – Oct. 1997 – videotaped

(cont’d)

L137

Steve Kahn [Lesson to BZ] – at AIG – Dec. 1999 – 1/2 of tape

(blank)

L138

Steve Kahn and Ian Banks [Lesson to BZ] – at Steve’s

(cont’d) [?]

L139

Steve Kahn [Lesson to BZ] – at AIG – Feb. 1, 2001 [?]

(cont’d)

L140

Steve Kahn [Lesson to BZ] – Feb. 2001

(cont’d)[?]

L141

Steve Kahn and Ian Banks [Lesson to BZ] – June, 2000

(cont’d)

L142 (+SG)

Steve Kahn at Kavehas – Then — Steve Kahn [Lesson to BZ] – Oct. 2000

(cont’d) – Steve Kahn at Kavehas

L143 (+SG)

Steve Kahn [Lesson to BZ] – with Peter Manuel – bad recording

Steve Kahn at Kavehas [first 95%] – bad recording – Then – From Manolo Sanlucar Guitar Master Class

L144

Steve Kahn and Ian Banks [Lesson to BZ] – Jan. 20, 2001

(cont’d)

L145

Steve Kahn – playing falsetas – Pedro Pena, Paco del Gastor, Diego del Gastor – super catalog of Bulerias ideas – Jan. 1973

Steve Kahn [letter/lesson to Chris Carnes in Spain] – Sept. 1973 – Bul (slow); Sig (long); Bul (cut off by end of tape

L146

Steve Kahn and Ian Banks [Lesson to BZ] – July, 2001

(blank)

L147

Steve Kahn and Ian Banks [Lesson to BZ] – July, 2001

(cont’d) [?]

B1

Danny Estulin – Flamenco radio show on CUIT (Canada) – History and Geography of Spain, and Bullfight

(cont’d)

B2

Danny Estulin – Flamenco radio show on CUIT (Canada) – Aug. 20, 1991 – Flamenco in Moron and Lebrija – part of show of Nov. 1, 1990 on Café de Chinitas

(cont’d)

B3

Danny Estulin – Flamenco radio show on CUIT (Canada) – Jan. 14, 1992 –

(cont’d) – part of show of Jan. 7, 1992

B4

Brook Zern – Flamenco radio show on WBAI, New York [Part 1]

(cont’d)

B5

Brook Zern – Flamenco radio show on WBAI, New York [Part 2]

_____

B6

Rene Heredia – Flamenco radio show

(cont’d)

B7 – Sabicas in Concert – Radio show – concert in Chicago, broadcast in New York with commentary by Brook Zern

B8(JK)

Radio Sevilla

(cont’d)

B9(JK)

Radio Sevilla – Oct. 13, 1992

(cont’d)

B10(JK)

Radio Sevilla, April, 1993 – Radio Jerez

(cont’d)

B11(JK)

Radio Jerez – May 24, 1993

(cont’d)

B12(JK)

Radio Granada – May 19, 1993

(cont’d – ends 2/3 thru)

B13(JK) 2

Radio Granada – May 19, 1993

(cont’d)

B14(JK)

Radio Cordoba – Aug. 1, 1994 – interview with Rafael Riqueni

Radio Jerez – 1994

B15(JK)

Radio Sevilla – Paradas Festival (?) – April, 1993

(cont’d)

B16(JK)

Radio Sevilla – Aug. 15, 1994 – Camaron and Tomatito en directo

(cont’d)

B17(JK)

Radio Malaga – Sevilla Bienal, 1994 – Nov. 13, 1994

(cont’d) – defective recording

B18(JK)

Radio en Madrid y Sevilla – March 1992

Radio Granada – March 1, 1994

B19(JK)

Radio Sevilla – Jan. 28. 1994

Radio Jerez

B20(JK)

Radio Jerez “Flamenco Vivo” – June 6, 1993 – side B

Radio Jerez “Flamenco Vivo” – May 26, 1993 – side A

B21(JK)

Radio Jerez – June 6, 1993

(cont’d) [?]

B22(JK) [same as B--(JK)?]

Radio Sevilla #1 – Oct. 1992

_____

B23(JK)

Radio Sevilla – Oct. 7, 1992

(cont’d)

B24(JK) [Same as B--(JK)?]

Radio Sevilla – Oct. 1992

(cont’d) – to 1/2 – from 90’ tape)

B25(JK)

Radio Granada – Dec. 29, 1993

(cont’d) – Pele, Agujeta en vivo

B26(JK) [Same as B--(JK)?]

Radio en Sevilla – Oct. 1992

(cont’d)

B27(JK) [Same as B--(JK)?]

Sevilla Radio – Oct. 13, 1992

(cont’d)

B28(JK)

[non-flamenco] Songs of the Spanish Civil War

Radio de Jerez – Nano de Jerez – Jan. 20, 1994

B29(JK)

Radio _____ [?] – Miguel Vargas w/Jose Luis Postigo, Lebrijano w/Enrique de Melchor

(cont’d) – To Radio Jerez – July 6, 1993

B30(JK)

Radio Granada – Jan. 31, 1994

Radio Jerez – Nano de Jerez “Alrreo de la Fragua” [record] – Jan. 20, 1994

B31(JK) [v. B-- – same]

Radio _____ Miguel Vargas w/Jose Luis Postigo; Lebrijano w/Melchor, hijo

Radio Jerez – June 7, 1993 [July 6, 1993?]

G1

From Greg Case – Serva ?

(cont’d)[?]

G2

David Serva – [from] Mike Kelly – 1 – Bul, Sig, Rumba in Em, Tientos, Tangos, Sol, Taranta, Taranto, Sol, Al in E (Rosas), Gran

(cont’d) – Al in C (Cantinas), Gran, Mineras, Al in E (Rosas), Bul in E, Nanas, Tientos – Diego del Gastor: Bul in A, Bul in E, Sol, Bul

G3

Ian Banks, Danny Estulin, Brook Zern at AIG

(cont’d)[?]

G4

Ken Antoine – Jan. 1990 – Sevillanas, Sol

(cont’d) Sol, Bul, Taranto, Bul, Sig

G5

The Gypsy Flamenco of Agustin Rios

Omar Mohklare [?]

G6

Brook Zern at Power Station

(cont’d)

G7

Brook Zern at _____

(cont’d)

G8

David Serva at AIG – May 5, 1993 – while being filmed at New York Guitar Gallery – he picks up guitar after 20 minutes of filming

(blank)

G9

E.G. Zern [Ed Zern] – Sig, Farruca, Sevillanas, Sol

[non flamenco] – Art Rosenbaum, banjo or guitar lesson to B.Z.

G10

Jesus 1994 – guitarist plays various forms for someone –

(cont’d) – to 10’

G11 [v. G10 – same?]

Jesus (guitar teacher) – Jan. 1994-April 1994

(cont’d)

G12

BZ practice- Turin House (c. 1974-75?) – then 1967

(cont’d)[?]

G13

BZ practice – 1970’s – then 1964 with KZ – 1970’s – Sig, Sol, Bul, Al in A, Bul,, Sig – 1964 – Al in A, Bul, Fand, Sig, Sol – c. _____ – Bul – Al, Bul, Sol, Bul, Sig, Bul, Sig,

(blank)

G14 [v. L__ - same]

Dieguito – Sevilla – April 21, 1979 – Sol, Bul, Sig – copied to M99(30)

(cont’d)

G15

Brook Zern at _____ [possibly at session arranged by Gabriel Oller, taped at a church]

(cont’d) [?]

G16

Joel Kabokov (guitar) and Charlene (singer) – (20 minutes) – and other flamenco

“Flamenco Stuff (filler but good)”

G17 (+L)

Edward Freeman: Zambra; Jerry Lobdill: Tanguillo; Sarita Heredia w/Jerry Lobdill: Guajira

Lesson [Evan Harrar to BZ]

G18

Chuck Keyser – Farruca, Sevillanas, Zambra, Sig

[5 minutes only - family noise, BZ practice – Turin House]

G19 [v. G9 – same]

Ed Zern [E.G. Zern] plays material of Fidel Zabal, c. 1956 – Sig, Farruca, Sevillanas, Sol

(blank [?])

G20

Paco de Lucia – E.P. _____ – Rondena, Bul, Al, Sig, Guajira – Then – Paco practicing at age 17 – Sig, Bul, Taranto

El Mundo Flamenco de Paco de Lucia – con Pepe de Lucia, cante – _____ – _____

G21

[very short tape – about 5’] – English Flamenco teacher of girl visitor to AIG

(cont’d) [?]

G22

David Serva – Dave Jones, Madrid, 1975 – Bul in E, Al in A, Bul in A, Sol in A, Bul in A minor

(cont’d) – Bul in E, Al in G, Cabales in A major, Sig, Taranto

G23

Bob Haynes – [from an open reel tape] — Sig, Sol in A, Sol, Bul, Tientos (Marianas), Sol, Tarantas – Then – Diego del Gastor – Al in E,

Paco de Lucia – Bul, Bul slowed, Taranto, Taranto slowed – Then NYC family noise

ADDITIONAL REFERENCES TO THE ABOVE TAPES:

Part Two – Tapes from Vicente Granados

No date: Cinta 1: Cantes de Pastora Pavon [La Nina de los Peines],
Luis Molina (g): Tarantas, Saeta, Bul, Sol, Tientos, Cart, Garrotin, Tangos, Bul, Tientos, Tientos, Mal, Tientos, Petenera, Sig, Bul, Cart y Verdial, Petenera, Sol, Sig, Farruca, Sol; Ramon
Montoya (g): Sig, Sol, Sig, Tientos; Antonio Moreno (g) Fand, Cantinas Malaguenas (Bul); Nino Ricardo (g) Bul, Sol, Sig, Fand, Petenera, Fand, Aleg, Saeta, Sig, Tangos, Sig, Petenera, Sol, Sol, Cart, Bul, Gran, Bul por Sol, Fand, Saeta, Sevillanas, Fand,
Manolo de Badajoz (g) Tangos, Bul por Sol, Tangos, Petenera, Aleg; Paquito Simon (g) Sevillanas; Melchor de Marchena (g) Tangos, Petenera, Sig, Bul, Sol de la Serneta, Mal, Fand, Fand de Huelva, Bul por Sol, Sig, Tangos, Bul por Sol, Bul, Bul, Bul, Mal, Sol, Aleg, Sig, Bul, Bul, Bul, Tangos, Bul; Recorded Live at Sevilla Flamenco Festival, 1963, Manuel Morao (g) Bul; Cantes de Tomas Pavon, Ramon Montoya (g) Sol, Sig; Nino Ricardo (g) Sig, Media Gran, Fand, Sol, Sol, Media Gran, Sig: Melchor de Marchena (g) Bul por Sol, Martinete y Debla, Sig, Sol, Cantes de El Nino Gloria, Nino Ricardo (g) Fand, Bul por Sol, Bul; Manolo de Badajoz (g) Sol, Sig, Nino Ricardo (g) Bul, Saeta

No Date: Grabado en casa de Pohren, Moron: Joselero & Paco del G Sol; Manolito & Diego Sol, Sol; Joselero & Diego Sig; Manolito & Diego Bul; Diego solo Sol; Joselero & Diego Fand; Manolito Maria & Eduardo de la Malena Sol; Manolito & Diego Bul, Sol, Sig; Paco del G solo Sol, Sig, Bul, Bul; D solo Sol, Bul; Mairena & Eduardo de la Malena Sol; Francisco Mairena & Eduardo de la Malena Sig; AM & Eduardo de la Malena Bul; Pepe Torres & Eduardo de la Malena Sol; Pepe Torres conversation Grabado para Brook 1

1971 Fiesta in Pena Los Llorones, Moron: Manuel Mairena & Paco del G Tientos y Tangos; Mairena & Paco del G Bul por Sol; Miguel Funi & Paco del G Bul; Manuel Mairena & Paco del G Sig; Mairena & Paco del G Bul; Miguel Funi & Paco del G Bul; Mairena & Paco del G Sig, Bul; Manuel Mairena & Paco del G Aleg; Mairena & Paco del G Aleg, Bul; Miguel Funi & Paco del G, Bul Tape 1 Brook

Sept. 1971 Festival de Ronda: Changuito & El Poeta Tangos, Bul; Agujeta & El Poeta Bul por Sol, Tientos; Curro Malena & Pedro Bacan Sol, Cantinas; Terremoto & El Poeta Bul, Sol; Chocolate & El Poeta Sig, Mirabras; Lebrijano & Pedro Pena Bul por Sol, Bul; D solo Bul, Sol; Agujeta & El Poeta Sol; Chocolate & El Poeta Sol; Agujeta & El Poeta, Sig; Agujeta Mart; Curro Malena & Pedro Bacan Bul; Fosforito & Habichuela Tientos Tape 1 Brook

Part Three – Tapes from Ted Bakewell

[NOTE: This list, on which 36 is the highest tape number, omits any mention of tapes numbered: 2, 7, 17, 22, and 28 – these may have been lost, or never received. It does include many references – about 13 of them – to non-numbered tapes that might originally have had the missing numbers.]

No Date: Feria Fiesta at Bob Fletcher’s: Bul, Garrotin Manolito and Fernandillo ; Danza Inca Bob Fletcher; Tango Paco; Bul A Aurelio Paco; Bul Fernandillo; Sig; Bul E Joselero, TB1

No Date exc. Easter Sunday at Eduardo de Albanil: Bul Am, Aleg; Bul E Gregorio and Joselero; Bul A Joselero; Danza Mora E; Bul E Manolito and Fernandillo; Bul E Fernandillo; Bul E Manolito; Rumba Fernandillo; Sevillanas E Manolito, Diego, Fernandillo, Manolito; Tarantas; Bul Manolito; Para Elisa (classical piece, Fur Elise) D; Tango Am Fernandillo; Bul Am, A Manolito; Bul A Fernandillo; Bul Manolito TB1

No Date: Dieguito, Rosito, Anz (solo) Joselero (solo) Lesson with Kenny Parker, Agustin, Joselero, Anz, Manolito, Rubio: Bul A Dieguito; Bul (1969) Anz solo; Bul Em, E Joselero; Sevillanas (solo); Bul A Dieguito; Bul A Dieguito Aurelio; Sol Joselero (solo); Sig (lesson with Kenny Parker); Sol Joselero Agustin; Bul A Anz Agustin; Fand Anz Agustin; Rumba Manolito Rubio TB3

No Date exc. Easter Sunday: Diego, Joselero, Fernandillo: Bul E Easter Sunday; Bul Moreen; Rumba solo; Bul solo; Danza Mora; Sol; Bul E Joselero; Sig solo; Sol Joselero; Fand solo; Gran solo; Sol; Fand; Bul E; Bul A Fernandillo; Fand Joselero; Aleg E Joselero; Bul A Fernandillo; Tango Fernandillo; Aleg E solo; Tarantas solo; TB4

No Date exc. Easter Sunday: Diego, Joselero: Bul A solo; Sig solo; Bul A solo; Sig solo; Bul A solo; Sig solo; Sol E solo; Sig solo; Bul A solo

Easter Sunday; Bul E Joselero; Bul A solo; Diego drunk at Juan Sala’s barber shop one month after death of his mother [see CC tape NN40 No Date (1/65?)]; Bul E Joselero TB 29

No Date: Diego at CC’s house – all solo guitar III: Gran, Sig, Sol, Bul, Sig, Bul Emaj, Aleg Em, Sevillanas D, A, C, Bm, Aleg C, E, Em; Media Gran, Tarantas, Tarantas, Gran, Bul E, Sig, Bul, Sevillanas, Bul Am, A, E; Sig, Bul A, Sol A, Sig, Bul A, Sig, Sol A, Sig TB5

No Date: [illegible] TB8

No Date: Diego, Manolito, Fna: Sol A Fna; Sol A Fna; Bul A Fna; Bul A Fna; Bul E Manolito TB10

No Date: Diego, Talegas, Pepe Torres: Sol Talegas; Sig Talegas; Sol solo; Sol Talegas; Sol A Talegas; Bul Emaj Talegas and Pepe Torres; Sol Talegas [illegible]; Bul Emaj Pepe Flores and Talegas; Sig Talegas; Bul A JT, Pepe Flores; Sol Paco del G Manolito; Aleg Paco del G dancer TB 14

No Date: Fiesta at Arnie’s Club Mercantil: Bul A Fernandillo; Bul A Manolito; Bul A Fna (?); Bul E Manolito; Sol Manolito; Bul A Manolito; Bul A Fna; Sol solo; Bul A Fna TB9

No Date: Club Mercantil Fiesta #2,3: Bul A Fna; Bul A Manolito; Bul A Fna; Sol solo; Bul A Fernandillo; Bul A Fna; Bul A Fna; Sol Manolito; Tango Fernandillo and Manolito; Bul A Fna; Tangadillo solo; Sol solo; Sol A solo TB10

No Date: Sol E Manolito; Bul solo A, Am at Venta Isidoro TB11

No Date [1966?]: Diego lessons with Carnes: Sol Diego Carnes; Gran solo (lesson); Aleg E, C; Bul E, Sol E, Sig, Sol A, Sig and Sol; Bul Joselero Carnes; Sol Joselero Carnes; Sol Carnes; Bul Carnes; TB 15

No Date: Barrio de Santa Cruz [?]: Sig Manuel Mairena; Bul A Fna; Sol A Fna; Sol A Fna; Bul A solo; Bul E Perrate; Sol E Perrate; Bul A Fna TB15

No Date: Diego, Fna, Perrate: Bul A Fna; Sol E Perrate; Sol A Fna; Sol E Perrate; Sig E Perrate; Bul A Fna (solo) TB18

No Date: Fna, Perrate, MS, Andorrano, Diego: Bul A Fna. (solo); Bul A Fna; Bul E Perrate; Bul A Fna; Sol A MS; Bul A Fna; Sig E Perrate; Sig MS; Bul A Fna; Bul A Andorrano (Paco del G) TB18

No Date: Joselero, Anz, Diego, Fna, Manolito: Sig A solo; Bul A solo; Sol A Fna; Sol E Perrate; Sol E solo; Bul A solo; Tientos Manolito; Bul E Manolito; Sol E Manolito; Tangos J; Bul A Alborea J, Nov. 72 TV show; Bul A J; Sig solo (Diego TV show); Bul A, Am Anz TB20

No Date: Diego, Fna, Gregorio, Joselero, Diego – cante, MS, much solo guitar: Bul Am solo; Bul A MS; Tangos A MS; Bul A solo; Tangos solo; Sol solo; Bul solo; Sig solo; Sol A Joselero; Bul A solo; Bul A Fna; Sol Gregorio; Bul A solo; Bul E, Em Gregorio, Joselero; Aleg E solo; Sol solo (lesson); Gran solo; Aleg C solo; Sol Diego (c), CC; Bul A Fna TB16

No Date: Paco del G, Dieguito, Gregorio, Antonio Mairena: Aleg Paco del G; Bul Paco del G; Sig Paco del G; Sig Antonio Mairena; Bul A Manolito; Bul E; Bul A Gregorio, Dieguito; Bul A Gregorio, Dieguito; Sig; Bul; Bul Gregorio, Dieguito TB36

No Date: Bul Dieguito; Sig Dieguito TB36

No Date: Diego, Fernandillo, Perrate: Bul E Fernandillo; Sol E solo; Bul E Fernandillo; Saeta La Nina de los Peines; Bul E Fernandillo Sol E Perrate TB21

No Date: Diego, Perrate, Joselero, Andorrano: Sol E Perrate; Sig A Curro Mairena; Rondenas Mario Escudero (g); Bul A Joselero (after TV show; upstairs Casa Pepe); Bul A Andorrano; Bul A solo – at Bar Pasaje TB21

No Date: Diego drunk at David’s [see NN41 No Date]: Sig solo; Sol solo; Bul A, E solo + Andre; Sig solo; Sol solo; Sig solo TB23

No Date: Agustin, Pepe Torres, Anz, Joselero, Dieguito: Sig Pepe Torres; Tangos E Joselero; Sig Pepe Torres; Bul A solo; Bul E Joselero; Tangos E Joselero; Bul A Agustin Suarez; Bul A Agustin Anz; Tangos E Agustin Anz; Bul A solo Dieguito TB30

No Date (?): Agustin, Joselero, Anz, Juan, [illegible]: Sol Joselero & Agustin; Bul E; Sig Joselero & Agustin; Sol Joselero & Agustin; Bul E Joselero & Agustin(?); Bul A Anz & Agustin; Bul A Anz & Agustin; Tango E J & Agustin; Sig E Joselero & Agustin; Bul A Joselero & Juan TB31

No Date: Agustin I: Sol; Bul; Media Gran; Recuerdo a Sevilla; Bul A; Bul A Andorrano; Bul E Andorrano, Jose Luis TB32

No Date: Agustin II, Dieguito I: Bul Agustin; Gran Agustin; Sol (Diego); Bul TB33

No Date: Bul E Diego; Bul Bm Diego (?); Sig Dieguito; Rondena Dieguito; Bul Dieguito TB33

No Date: Dieguito II, Anz: Bul (solo) Anz; Dieguito TB34

No Date [see CC Tape NN40 No Date (1/65?)]: Diego drunk at Chimenea’s house: Tarantas solo; Sol solo; Bul A solo; Sig solo; Bul A solo; Sig solo; Diego and Chimenea discourse; Sol solo; Bul E, A solo; Tanguillo Am, A solo TB23

No Date: D – Fiesta for Carlo’s sister at Denny’s house: Sol Andorrano; Sig solo; Bul A solo; Sol solo; Bul solo; Bul E Agustin;
Al; Tarantas solo; Sol solo; Bul A solo; Sol solo; Aleg C, E Agustin; Bul E, A solo; Sol solo TB1

No Date: Diego, Fna, Perrate: Bul A Fna; Bul E Perrate; Sevillanas Perrate; Bul A Fna; Bul Em Manolito; Bul E Fernandillo; Bul Am Pepe Flores TB__

No Date: Diego solo: TB__

No Date: Diego and Juan: TB__

No Date: Diego and Paco del G: TB__

No Date: La Nina de los Peines: Sig; Fand grande (?) Tarantas (?); Sol por Bul; Procession; Mart; Sig Dieguito; Folk Song (?); Sol; Procession; Mart; Fand; Sig; Bul La Nina de los Peines; Sig; Sig; Bul; Sol; Sol por Bul; Sol; Mart TB24

No Date: Manuel Torre: Sig; Aleg; Sig; Mart; Sol; Fand Grande;
Bul; Sol; Fand de Huelva; Media Gran TB 24

1965: Fiesta at Arnie’s: Bul A Fernandillo; Bul A Fernandillo and Joselero; Sig Joselero and Fernandillo; Bul A, Am Fernandillo; Bul A, Am Fernandillo; Bul A solo; Bul A, Am Fernandillo; Bul E Joselero, Bul A Fernandillo TB 12

1/23/65 Juerga in Upper Barrio: Bul A solo; Bul A Dieguito; Bul A solo; Sig Paco de las Caramelos – poetry; Sig solo; Bul A solo; Sig solo; Bul A solo; Sig solo; Aleg C solo; Bul A Fernandillo; Sol A Joselero TB12

Summer 1966(?): Bul A Perrate; Bul A Fna; Bul A solo: Bul E Enrique Mendez; Sol E Perrate; Bul A Fna; Bul E Fernandillo; Sol E Manolito; Bul Am, A MS; Bul A solo; Bul E Fernandillo; Bul A solo TB10

10/19/67: Bul A Joselero; Bul E Fernandillo; Bul E Joselero; Bul National Anthem; Bul Fernandillo; Sig MS; Bul TB__

10/26/68 [date from CC tape NN55] Gaspar’s Wedding Amparo, Manolito, Fernandillo: Bul Amparo; Bul lesson A; Bul Manolito (at Bob Fletcher’s); Bul por Tarantas Manolito; Bul Fernandillo; Tango E Manolito TB10

Spring 1970: D – Christening Fiesta for Larry and Meryl’s Mica: Bul solo; Bul CC and Enrique Mendez and MS; Sol solo; Aleg solo Dieguito; Tango Joselero and others; Rumba Juan; Bul Juan; Bul E Joselero and Andorrano and Fernandillo; Bul E Juan Andorrano; Bul A Fna; Bul E Perrate TB__

12/70: Diego and Joselero: ? TB6

12/70: Diego’s house Diego, Joselero [illegible] TB13

12/70: Diego’s house: Diego, Joselero: Fand de H.* (* following tape #13); Sol; Aleg; Sol; Bul; Bul TB25

1971 Two tapes of Diego and Agustin in fiesta and lessons TB__, TB__

2/71 Venta Luis: Fna; J; Andorrano: Sol A Fna; Bul A (David); Bul A Fa; Bul A, E Andorrano; Sol solo TB__

6/71 Diego’s house Diego, Andorrano, Gregorio; Sol solo; Bul A Andorrano; Sol A Andorrano; Bul A Gregorio; Bul E Andorrano, Gregorio; Sol E Andorrano; Bul A Andorrano (dancing); Tango Andorrano; Tango Andorrano, Gregorio; Bul A, E Andorrano, Gregorio [illegible] TB13

6/71 Diego’s [see tape TB13]: Bul A Andorrano; Sol A Andorrano; Bul A Gregorio; Bul E Andorrano, Gregorio; Sol E Andorrano; Bul A Andorrano (dancing); Tango Andorrano, Gregorio TB__

Summer 1971: Gazpacho de Moron: TB__

8/72 Diego and Joselero: Sol Joselero; Bul E Joselero; Bul E Joselero; Sol Joselero; Garrotin Joselero; Bul A Joselero; Tango Am, Tango Joselero; Bul A Joselero; Bul A Amparo & Paco del G; Bul Fernandillo, Pepe Rios (b) TB9

8/72 at Venta Diego and Joselero: Sol Joselero; Bul A solo; Aleg E Joselero; Aleg E Joselero; Bul E Joselero; Tarantas solo; Bul Bm solo; Aleg G solo; Aleg C (?) solo; Sol Chris Carnes & Joselero; Bul A solo; Aleg solo; Mal Joselero; Sig solo; Sol Joselero TB26

11/72: TV Show: Bul A Bna TB6

Spring 1973(?): Archivo Pirate Album: Tangos E Joselero; Bul Alborea Joselero; Sig Joselero; Bul A Fna TB6

4/73 or 5/73: Diego, Joselero, Andorrano: Bul A solo; Bul A Joselero; Bul A Andorrano TB 29

4/73 or 5/73 Diego, Joselero, Andorrano: Bul A solo; Bul E Joselero; Sol _ Joselero, Bul E solo; Bul A Andorrano TB35

5/2/73 National Geographic Record: Bul A, E, A (cancion: Cuatro muleros) Diego TB6

5/2/73 Diego, Joselero, Andorrano: Bul A solo; Bul Margo; Bul Em Joselero; Sol A; Sol E Joselero; Tarantas Andorrano; Tarantas Joselero; Tango Andorrano and Joselero; Sig solo; Sig Joselero; Bul A Joselero; Bul A solo; Bul Joselero (Jill); Bul E Joselero; Sol Joselero; Sol solo; Bul A Joselero; Bul A solo; Sig Joselero; Sig solo TB27

5/2/73 Diego: Sig solo; Sol solo and Joselero; Bul A solo (Chimenea’s house); Bul E Joselero; Bul A; Bul A Fna; Sol A Fna
TB __

6/73 (Late): Espartero: David Jones: Al Dm, Bul A, Bul Bm, Sig Paco Curro Mairena; Sol solo; Bul E Andorrano; Bul E Andorrano; TB6

No Date except: 7/73 (First week) D, Fna: Tangadillo A solo; Al C solo; Sig solo; Bul E Fernandillo; Sol Joselero; Bul A Fna (lst wk, July 73); Bul A Fna; Bul A solo; Bul A Fernandillo; Bul A solo and Fernandillo; Bul A, E, A solo; Bul E Nino Rosa; Sol solo; Bul E Nino Rosa; Sig Nino Rosa; TB19

February 28, 2017   No Comments

Flamenco Guitarist Javier Molina – A 2006 appraisal by Brook Zern

JAVIER MOLINA (1868-1956) – A 2006 Appraisal by Brook Zern

Javier Molina, jerezano y tocaor, died half a century ago. If Jerez is the vital center of flamenco guitar, at least until the advent of Paco de Lucia’s very different approach, then Javier Molina is the man who essentially created this fabulous style.

And this anniversary did not go unobserved. At the Jerez campus of the University of Cadiz, a conference marked the occasion with panelists who included guitarists Manuel Morao and Manolo Sanlúcar, as well as Balao, a long-ago student of Javier Molina who currently teaches in Jerez.

The towering figure of Javier remains an almost palpable presence in Jerez. Yet there is something enigmatic about his enormous legacy.

Why, for example, are we left with just four brief recorded examples of his singular art? And why does an outsider find it so hard to pin down exactly what he created, and exactly how he changed the sound and feel of the flamenco guitar?

Four cuts. That’s fewer than we have from Manolo de Huelva, another singular genius – but one who was obsessed with secrecy, and evidently succeeded of robbing posterity of his art. Four cuts – two siguiriyas, two soleares – all with Manuel Torre, by many measures the greatest flamenco singer who ever lived – all recorded in 1931, when he was 63. And then nothing, during the 25 years before the guitarist’s death.

It seems almost ironic, then, that his life itself is so thoroughly documented. In fact, he may be the first flamenco guitarist to have written his own autobiography.

In 1964, I bought a copy of “Javier Molina: Jerezano y Tocaor – Memorias Autografas de su Vida Artistica”, by Augusto Butler, a noted man of letters of that era who often used the pseudonym “Maximo Andaluz” to underline his devotion to that region and its culture.

While Butler provides the fine prologue and detailed notes, the work itself was written by Javier and describes his life and art until about 1941, when he retired from the active flamenco life It’s a remarkable collection of keen observations and reminiscences that illuminates the entire early and middle phases of flamenco’s history.

Javier started playing professionally at the age of eight – his few lessons were probably from Paco el Barbero who had learned from the legendary Maestro Patiño – and he was still quite young when he went to work in the early cafes cantantes with singers including Juan Breva, El Marrurro, Enrique Ortega, El Canario and other key figures of that epoch. He soon became friends with a young shoemaker named Antonio Chacón – Manuel Torre’s most avid fan, who would also become his most credible challenger for the unofficial title of Spain’s greatest flamenco singer.

The rest is history. Javier and Chacón became one of the greatest pairings in all of flamenco, working in Seville where Javier would remain for some twenty years,

Don Pohren, in his brilliant “Lives and Legends of Flamenco”, cites the “unending number of creations from his fertile mind”. He notes that Ramón Montoya, often considered the main progenitor of flamenco guitar, was both the main rival and a devoted admirer of Javier Molina, and that the jerezano had a strong influence on Ramon’s musical development. Pohren also states that Javier was “less flashy and far more earthily flamenco than Ramon”

Javier’s accompaniment is absolutely superb, as those few cuts with Torre prove. It’s interesting to note that he was also a notable soloist. But it seems that his funky/earthy side wasn’t the one he flaunted in his solo work. In a revealing and cranky note, Augusto Butler says that Javier “had a real weakness for his ‘solos’. When the moment was propitious, and even when it really wasn’t, we’d hear him interpreting – magnificently, it’s true – his arrangements of operettas and zarzuelas that were then in vogue. If only his preferences as a soloist ran toward the old styles that he must have heard a hundred times, the art of Maestro Patiño, or [Julian] Arcas, or Pepe Lucena or Habichuela, to name a few of his immediate antecedents, it would have been most reasonable; but to squander his time and creative capacity on such ingenuous nothings…”

Another early treatment of Javier’s importance is found in Juan de la Plata’s monumental 1961 work, “Flamencos de Jerez”, in which he says that Javier Molina and Paco Lucena were the first flamencos to use all their fingers, and not just the thumb, in their playing. (While it may well have seemed that way, the claim is probably somewhat overstated.) He confirms that Ramón Montoya, described as the only artist worthy of comparison with Javier, “often said that he was formed as a player by working at the jerezano’s side”.

The earliest description of Javier and his work is found in Fernando el de Triana’s seminal “Arte y Artistas Flamencas”, which says that his mastery was so extraordinary that he was called El Brujo de la Guitarra, the Wizard of the Guitar, adding that “Javier Molina is the guitarist who most carefully conserved the accompaniment of the most difficult old songs.”

Humberto J. Wilkes, in “Niño Ricardo: Rostro de un Maestro”, writes of Javier and his infuence on Ricardo. “Javier Molina played with a fluidity and beauty as well as a very personal sound. He had good taste in choosing falsetas for accompaniment. He was the first guitarist Ricardo really ran up against, and Ricardo learned a lot from their work together at the Café de Novedades. Ricardo admired him so much that he wanted to make a recording called “Three Epochs of Flamenco guitar” in which he, Javier and Manolo de Huelva would each contribute a section. The idea came to naught, because Manolo refused to participate and Javier was too ill. What a shame – and yet, Niño Ricardo always carried Javier and his era in memory, and this served as the inspiration for many of his falsetas and his accompaniment”.

At the conference on Javier, Manolo Sanlúcar spoke reverently of Javier as one of his earliest and most influential teachers, while Balao recalled aspects of the man’s personality. But it seemed clear that the crucial link to Javier’s toque was, and is, Manuel Morao, who studied with him and was marinated and molded in his influence, to the extent that it would be hard to separate the contributions of the two. At the same time, it seemed that Sanlúcar and others wanted to make it clear that the signature Bulerías of Jerez, with their unmistakable pulse and power, owes more to the genius of Manuel Morao than to Javier. (In fact, this not really surprising, considering that the Bulerías form itself may not have been fully formed and stabilized until Javier was well past middle age.)

Like some other students of flamenco guitar, I still hope to learn more about how Javier really sounded and how his influence is expressed today, and to collect his surviving music.

A decade ago in New York, I was able to ask Manuel Parilla to show me some of Javier’s essential contributions, which included superb falsetas that were new to me as well as others that recalled Ricardo and, especially in the Alegrías, Sabicas. (These appear on the 1999 Parilla CD “Nostalgia” as “Recordando a Javier”.)

It was the conclusion of Juan de la Plata’s section on Javier Molina that offered the best hope for experiencing the art of this man. “His portentous and colossal toque, full of subtle flamenco essence, has been recorded for posterity in the Instituto de Musicología de Barcelona.”

In Jerez recently, I had the opportunity to ask Juan de la Plata about this excellent book (“A youthful indiscretion,” he called it with a smile) and those old recordings. He said it was possible that the Institute in Barcelona might still have them somewhere, though it could have changed its name. I said I hoped someone would try to unearth this aural treasure – a hope I repeated at the university seminar. Nobody volunteered. (Barcelona, anyone?)

Today, the Jerez school of guitar endures. And that is perhaps the greatest testament to the strength Javier Molina’s legacy. While other key areas have rushed to embrace the profound changes pioneered by the fabulous Paco de Lucía – notably the stress on a rich new pallet of harmonies, chords, shifting tonal centers and jazz-influenced scales and intervals – the guitar you hear in Jerez is still likely to be direct, powerful and recognizable, referring as much to its illustrious past as to its promising future.

Javier Molina rules!

February 28, 2017   No Comments

Flamenco Guitarist Diego del Gastor – A loving, over-the-top 2008 appraisal by Luís Soler Guevara – translated by Brook Zern

This is a translation of a talk given by Luís Soler Guevara in 2008 to mark the centenary of the birth of Diego del Gastor. Señor Soler is a highly respected flamenco expert whom I knew in Málaga. He clearly loved Diego, as did many others who spent time with him in his home town of Morón de la Frontera. Soler wears his heart on his sleeve here, and one might wonder if his adoration has clouded his judgement or his normally sound critical faculties. (Fortunately, I never lost my objectivity in this matter, although for years I assumed the Flamenco Society of San Diego was a religious organization. Still, I have always maintained strict objectivity regarding Diegod.)

It’s nice to see Sr. Soler’s recognition of my dear friends Steve Kahn and Estela Zatania, and queridos amigos Bill Davidson and the late Don Pohren, who was the first and finest of the American flamencologists. Apologies for some likely mistranslations:

Mi Abrazo a Diego del Gastor — My Embrace ot Diego del Gastor

Flamenco aficionados, those of us who dedicate ourselves to investigating, studying, writing – in other words, to inventing a history of the art – fall short with respect to the guitar. We can reflect upon aspects of the guitarist, or sketch his profile as a person, and possibly situate the guitarist’s position in the history of the art, abandoning ourselves to his capacity to generate deep emotions. It’s this latter aspect that is reflected in the title of this article: My embrace for Diego del Gastor.

Diego has evoked so many perceptions among writers, poets and aficionados the I find it very deifficult to say anything new about him; and since I’m not a musician, the task is even more daunting. Still, the evocative aura of this great guitarist is so extraordinarily rich that these times come to consecrate his expressive capacity, even for those who may not know music but feel touched by his magic.

So let these words serve as a prologue to the marvelous sound that Diego, more than anyone else, institutionalized as the toque de Morón – the Morón guitar style. For that reason, I’ll try to say something about a man who, beyond Andalucía, sowed a unique approach to making the guitar make music.

His name was as singular as his playing. Before him, I know of no other guitarist with his name. It’s as if the history of flamenco reserved it especially for him. It’s enough to say those five letters for everyone to know who we’re talking about; even when a guitarist plays his signature variations or falsetas we can’t help noticing who his name, escapes like a sussuro: A whisper that, beyond admiration, conveys adoration of his music.

Diego didn’t seek interviews, but he didn’t avoid them either, in one, done for Spanish National Television, he said that his baptism lasted for five days. Five letters that on that occasion were given to him as a name. Five letters, like the five continents to which his magical sounds eventually expanded. Five letters that can define and describe his artistic personality.

D Duende
I Impresionante
E Especial
G Grande
O Original

Diego had lots of duende, his playing was impressive, his personage was special and his art was grand and original.

Diego was not a virtuos of the guitar; nonetheless he had many virtues. Among them, the one that stands out to me is the virtue of making us fall in love. In love with his profound and majestic toque festero – the lighter styles that were the pulse of so many fiestas or flamenco jam sessions. Diego’s guitar exists in the realm of the sacred.

His art, though born in this world, belongs to the sacred. He created his music as oysters create their own beautiful works: some irritating agent, though barely noticed, slowly, without any hurry, but inexorably. His dream, a living legend from an earlier time that refuses to die with the dawn of a new millennium, remains vital, and stands out in the desert of phantasms that arise in the flamenco galaxy of opportunism and glitz.

For Diego, flamenco was never just a spectacle or a commodity; when this happens, it is actually devalued. For Diego, flamenco is a culture steeped in centuries. It is a way of thinking and feeling while confronting life. A way of expressing one’s totality of life experiences and of communicating them to others through a lyrical art.

I’d like to pursue this intimate concept of flamenco whose greatest power is the most authentic expression of lives and traditions through music. I’d like to keep hauling this cart full of diverse passions that awaken and feed this Andalusian culture. I want to continue embracing Diego del Gastor – his wizardry and his imperishable enchantment. His unique way of feeling flamenco. I want to follow this flag, although I don’t like the abanderados.

I don’t want to become distracted by criticizing the consumerism that devours so many musics that flow from the heart of human beings. Still, I’ll say, paraphrasing a poem by Georges Brassens: “People don’t like it when someone has his own faith.” That’s an issue I don’t want to get into right now, one that generates attitudes and actions with respect to how one also understands flamenco.

Diego is more essence (fondo) than form. I love that essence and the ethic of things, more than their forms and aesthetics. But I can’t ignore the latter. Perhaps for this reason, those words, although situated on the border of passion, do not imply the abandonment of the merely rational.

While other Diego de Gastors may keep arising in this Andalusian landscape, my heart will keep navigating toward the paths that seek the road leading to the majestic in the art of flamenco. His providential figure, more than a song to life, was a song to love, a challenge to the impossible, a challenge to what we call art, and despite the fact that my soul is aflame, I will continue to embrace that sound.

Diego del Gastor was also Diego of Arriate, Diego de Ronda, Diego de Moron, de Utrera – Diego of a thousand different flamenco geographies, because he came from all of them. All those places where in a night of profound emotions we would discover his musical talent and his deeply personal way of caressing the guitar.

Diego, despite the fact that he rarely left his home – when he did, Utrera and the countryside were his preferred pilgrimages – generated afición in hundreds of people who, even if they were born abroad, decided to live their lives enveloped in this culture. In this – more than a task, a devotional sense of a sensibility that was so impressive – I believe he was unsurpassed. For him, it was all just natural. He was a teacher of many who never asked to be his students. Those who would be inculcated and impregnated with the simple maxim: There is no better university than life itself. And in this, Diego had the real doctorate.

Diego has been a great ambassador, especially in the U.S.: Surprisingly, he was almost as well known in California as in Andalucía. People of note in worlds as diverse as Bergamín, García Ulecia, Don Pohren, Steve Kahn, Roger Klein, William Davidson, Estela Zatania, etc., discovered the warmth of a man whose spell would captivate them forever.

It all happened without Diego traveling to the other stages of the world that are so crucial to the reputation and projection of so many other artists. For this reason, the singularity and the figure of Diego del Gastor in the flamenco world can not only be found in his artistic qualities, but also in his role as the ambassador of a unique and very intimate concept of flamenco.

His gigs, almost always marked by restricted appearances and hundreds of encounters in the flamenco world of Morón, were shared with the likes of artists like Juan Talega, Manolito de la Maria, Perrate, Joselero, Fernandillo, Curro Mairena, Bernarda de Utrera, Enrique Mendez and just a few others, but above all his muse, Fernanda de Utrera.

The Morón-born historian Juan J. García López offers us this information: “In Japan, his style is pedagogically systematized in conservatories; in New York, there exists a school of guitar that studies his musical forms and artistic modes. That school carries his name: The School of Diego del Gastor.”

Yes, Diego created a school, albeit limited in terms of repertoire, but very distinctive and intensely real and current. His falsetas and variations, somehow terrifying as well as tremendously demanding, constructed and expressed with an enchantment that is deeply profound, have not passed unnoticed for many, including some who may not acknowledge their source. Those who have questioned not the flamenco essence of his art but his framework and technical prowess.

Moreover, what gives value to an artist’s work, regardless of what he creates, is how he does it. Diego, as well as having enormous talent, had an intuition and a special heart that generated music. He captured the essences of old popular and folk songs and choruses, even from classical pieces, where he incorporated those fragments into his repertoire, giving them a rare flamenco aspect. He did his his way – that is, differently from anyone else.

Perhaps his trademarks created a certain envy in other artists, those who fall of their own weight while Diego never chased a professional career or competed with the famous guitarists of his time. He only tried to express himself within his singular sensibility, and at that he succeeded.

We hear his impressive sting in the flamenco form called the soleares, in his interrupted silences in the realm of the siguiriyas, in his musical resolutions based on the malagueñas that Ramón Montoya recorded in 1910 while accompanying the singer Niño de la Isla. And in the arrangements and combinations that he enployed to give a flamenco flair to one of the most beautiful of all classical pieces, Beethoven’s Fur Elise.

Diego put his soul into everything he played. Without soul, art cannot be sublime. Art is a mixture of the expressive qualities of the artist and the domination and knowledge of technique. For that reason, when some aficionados wish to diminish the importance of the Morón style of guitar, they focus o its technical deficiencies, defending the well executed, placing value almost exclusively on technical perfection, and forgetting the essential quality of the elements of flamenco substance that the artist must generate to create truth.

Diego was very delicate. He had, and felt, a profound respect for flamenco. He liked silence and quietude, not the applause of the public or the voices of those whose shouted encouragements were simply showing off, and revealed no understanding of the art’s rhythmic essence; his performances were preceded with enormous elegance, and his mastery of the crucial quality of saber estar – of “knowing how to be” – were almost religious.

For him, that was the rule of conduct to follow when exercising the ritual of flamenco song and guitar. If a fly bothered him, it wasn’t because he was fussy, though in some measure he was, but because of his high regard for the art.

Diego loved the flamenco song so much that at times, he buscaba arropes in the family tradition to interpret some styles of soleares. Among them were those sung by his father, and those that he, along with his brother, the singer Joselero, called “flamenco songs (cantes) of the Sierra de Grazalema”.

Some will know that Grazalema is a town in the province of Cadiz whose mountains surround Arriate, Ronda and El Gastor, where Diego was born, baptized and spent his early years.

He showed those songs to Joselero, and later they entered the repertoire of the great artist Juan Peña el Lebrijano. Diego, aside from being a guitarist, was thus a transmitter of songs.

We can’t be sure, but it seems that those old variants of the soleares, possibly originating in that area, were incorporated into the soleares of Anilla de Ronda, a singer and guitarist, who was related to Diego. Anilla, also surnamed Amaya, and a Gypsy as was Diego, was widely admired as a singer of soleares.

One possible interpretation of all this leads us to say that the songs brought to light by Diego dated back almost a century and a half, and the family tradition brings it to us today.

This is one revelation among hundreds, among thousands of sounds, that leads me to say with some justification that the evolution of time has conserved and polished through the years the manifest grandeur of this musical culture of southern Spain, unprecedented in the history of civilization. Diego Flores Amaya is one more link in a chain whose reach offers us a perspective of centuries.

Photo caption – Diego, with Curro Vera and neighbors from the Barrio de Santa Maria in Morón

Having said this, it seems proper to note that Diego was a great aficionado of flamenco song, a quality that is not often seen among the new figures that have arisen in flamenco guitar, where technique dominates their approach, but where the heart, that motor of deep emotions, remains firmly in second place.

To this last thread, let me offer some reflections that underline the contrast between the guitar of Diego del Gastor and the new conception of flamenco shared by most of the great flamenco guitarists, whose prestige I won’t question, much less criticize.

To illustrate, I will describe some qualities that apply to guitar playing. First, the tendency to accelerate the rhythm. Then the sheer velocity in the production of notes. Today there are excellent guitarists who, in a common phrase, eat up the guitar – but who may not digest or assimilate it. They can play ten notes per second, but are incapable of generating a silence that captivates the soul.

Silences are not the negation of music, but the most exquisite of its contrasts. Music is the organization of elements which expresses the combination of sounds and silences, Silences are the space which fills our sense of reflection. Without those silences there are fewer moments for reflection and that therefore one cannot fully relish the sublime moments in guitar playing. Diego took the distance with respect to that conception or current of understanding the marvelous world of music.

Diego felt the necessity of transmitting his art. For that he had to interpret and above all digest what he wished in order to call forth the rest, In every artist’s mind there is something deeply present: the communication of his world, his work and his art.

To digest and absorb is also to meditate very carefully upon something in order to understand it. No one would drink boiling coffee because, aside from burning you, it would not have real flavor. In other words, the act of drinking coffee requires spaces for reflection in order to appreciate what you’re doing. When we speak of harmonic sounds, and although the human ear, as a receiver of sound, is scientifically prepared to instantaneously connect to its production, its storehouse of associations and its understanding demand a temporal space to enjoy the process.

Taking that theory to extremes: If a guitarist could produce all his sounds at once, we would achieve the complete negation of harmony and of music itself. We could only perceive one single noise.

When the rhythm accelerates, the silences become shorter. Almost imperceptible, one might say. And the less silence, the less sosiego and the fewer reflections. I think it’s fair to say that allowing oneself to be captivated by the notes of a flamenco guitar requires a great calmness. Without that predisposition it’s impossible to perceive all its distinctive aroma.

Let’s take as an example a sung soleares. The interpretation of the sound does not rise at the peak, but at the conclusion, in the transit toward the end, when the song is reaching its close. Raising the voice is relatively easy. What’s really difficult is maintaining its descending scale, the sostenido (sharp). In those spaces, in those silences, we find the best flavors, the best moments. The guitar also seeks this catharsis. Sustaining a note is much harder than elevating it. And I believe that here we find the world of Diego.

Another current today is the construction of very extended falsetas (guitar variations) together with the singing action: the tendency toward concertism. In this situation the accompanying guitar per se should not take over the mission of the principal subject in a flamenco oration – that is, of the singer – but should instead complement the work of the singer. That’s done by offering dialogues, and indicating paths so the song can be manifested in its fullest dimension.

Photo caption: Steve Kahn and Diego del Gastor in Morón, 1967. Photo by Chris Carnes

The act of singing, or of playing in the guitarist’s case, is necessarily the product of the register of the artist. This register stores a treasury of dialogues that the singer as much as the guitarist transform in establishing through the principal aspect, the song. I say the song, not the singer.

Remember what Fernanda de Utrera said in an interview: “Diego and I were the pair that most perfectly complemented one another (se ha compenetrado] in flamenco. Each of us in love with the art of the other. I was the strings of his guitar, and he was the urgent lament (queja) of my voice.” And she concluded: “No one knew how to draw out what I carry within myself like Diego del Gastor.”

Francisco Ayala also offered a lucid analysis of the figure of Diego, affirming: “The playing of Diego del Gastor contains more soul, more duende, than the playing of any other flamenco guitarist today. Diego doesn’t adhere to the modern trend for speed and for personal showing off (lucimiento), admittedly necessary for those who must compete in today’s commercial atmosphere of flamenco. On the contrary, he tenaciously retains the simplicity of times gone by, before the flamenco guitar was turned into a virtuoso instrument, when it was still fundamentally a genuine and primitive medium for expressing the depth of flamenco.”

In some way, he exaggerates the great aficionado/artist of Morón. Diego is just that way, neither competing nor feeling like a competitor. He just expresses way of being, a form of feeling, of living, a way of making flamenco; his way, neither better nor worse than another way, but different. And that difference, fundamentally, is located in the soul that he puts into everything he plays.

Perhaps this phrase could increase the level of confusion in some not very initiated aficionados, since they may think that every artist puts his soul into whatever he does. That may be true, as certain as the fact that every athlete wants to win, but it’s just as certain that only one person can actually succeed. Allow me this metaphor: This is Diego. From him we see from the beginning the great virtue of falling in love with his art.

Diego’s playing is like a river,: mysterious and enigmatic, such that we will never be able to verify how its waters flow to so many seas and so many oceans.

Also allow me the following reflection: There are some who approach a flower just to see its colors. Others, however, may also appreciate its smell. There are those who approach the sea to look at it and only see its surface. Then there are others who also want to know its depths. Diego is like the flower that only reveals its true profile and its true aroma when we get to the bottom.

At the root of this consideration I ask this question: Why should we stop with the appearances of things, in their forms; why not penetrate right to the essence? Diego’s guitar is like that deep and warm sea whose flavors and pleasures can only be paladear and felt by submerging oneself in its waters, by abandoning oneself to its notes.

My embrace of Diego del Gastor must necessarily take note of these aspects. Now, from the perspecitive of years gone by, though it’s difficult not to submerge oneself in this well where time gives rise to a nostalgia that idealizes those yesterdays, I feel that my heart remembers – perhaps aided by the many celebrations that are marking the centenary of his birth – with more urgency than ever. Diego left us thirty-five years ago. For me, more than an enormous void, he left a world of magias that I have been discovering, slowly, the same way that oysters perform their beautiful work.

My embrace of Diego del Gastor is just one more. One more embrace among the many shared with hundreds of aficionados, whose sensibilities recognize the singular fact of an artist born asido the belly of a guitar, who knew how to use its six strings to evoke emotions that were as fascinating as they were insolitas unexpected.

My embrace of Diego del Gastor is not a farewell but an encounter. A long-lasting encounter with an artist whose greatest treasure was captivating me. Captivating me forever with that extraordinarily rich music extracted from the people, from the essence of centuries past.

My embrace of Diego del Gastor also signifies my most sincere recognition of this Andalusian culture that you have given me. My embrace of Diego is my embrace of an art that sows passions, that spills emotions, and that is the envy of the whole world.

Thank you for your attention.

Conference for the Pablo Olavide University in Carmona, July 3, 2008 by Luís Soler Guevara

Translator’s note: The many flamenco people who never bought Diego’s act will no doubt find this laughable. Well, maybe it’s a bit overwrought, but I think it sheds light on the character and the genuinely mysterious art of Diego del Gastor. It has been my imagined privilege to carry his music in my fingers for more than half a century, and as I struggle to do it justice and recapture his unique air (aire) and his unmistakeable creations, I sometimes think of a line from a flamenco song, probably a malagueña: “Perlas a millares” which must mean “pearls by the thousands.”

Last week in New York, it was my real privilege to reminisce about Diego with one of the few people who actually did capture his essence, the great aficionado and noted photographer Steve Kahn, who created an important show of photographs by himself and others capturing the essence of those years we squandered at the figurative feet of this giant. The original article appears, with photos of Diego, Steve and others, at this url:

http://www.agenda-atalaya.com/mi-abrazo-a-diego-del-gastor/

P.S. I like the notion, mentioned above and widely believed in Spain, that in New York there was/is a school devoted to the preservation of the upkeep and preservation of the guitar style of Diego del Gastor. Of course, there never was such a thing. But for decades I was playing his stuff for any willing or unwilling listeners, usually alone but joined for one recent decade by Steve and then by Ian Banks, another fine interpreter of the style, who is still presenting this living tradition at cafés and other venues in the Big Apple.

Come to think of it, I guess maybe it could be called a school. A bit understaffed, admittedly, but yeah, why not?

To see this man at work, go to YouTube, add “flamenco”, “rito”, “Diego del Gastor” and “English”. Yep, that was the first of the 100 programs in this great Rito y Geografia de Flamenco documentary series that I liberated starting in 1972 (I bought it on 16 mm film), and it made my year; fifteen exhausting years later I finally got the rest. And by the way, when it was time to choose the introductory theme music for every damn episode, from a dozen worthy guitarists who are now legndary, who do you think the team of experts chose to give maximum flamenco-ness to the proceedings. You guessed it.

Abrazos a todos, as they say in Spain.

Brook Zern

February 16, 2017   No Comments

Flamenco Guitarist Vicente Amigo – a Stark Raving Review by Alberto García Reyes – translated by Brook Zern

From ABCdeSevilla, September 17, 2016, comes this report from the Bienal de Sevilla, the major Andalusian flamenco festival.

Vicente Amigo, the Messiah of the Guitar

The brilliant guitarist makes history with a memorable concert that marks a before and after

By Alberto García Reyes

Once upon a time there was a guitarist who came down from the sky. A hero with fingernails of velvet, born to caress the monument of Andalusian sound. His name was Vicente. Vicente Amigo. And they tell of the legend who arrived in Seville after the reign of Paco de Lucia, and without saying a word, without even tuning up his guitar, sat down and made history with his rendering of the soleá. A soleá dredged up from the richest seam of a mine known only to the angels in paradise.

He began with a piece from the mining district of Spain’s southeast, steeped in the essence of the great guitarist Niño Ricardo, sounding both megalithic and avant-garde. He weaved a thousand melodic variations of immense profundity. Without technical excess or technical deficiency. Launching a duel between perfection and emotion. Playing like a whirlwind, not intending to please us, but to inflict pain.

Once upon a time there was a king who asked for no realm beyond the deep well of his guitar. A protoman chosen for the succession. A deity who played the flamenco tangos for the dance of his cousin Antonio. Inventing new harmonies to bring new green shoots to olive groves a thousand years old. A captain of a paper boat who slowed the pulse of his bulerías to oil the tips of his fingers with a distinctive, slow sound, like the procession of the toreros in Seville’s Maestranza bullring. The helmsman of some tanguillos that seemed to loose falcons from his hands, but were never a vehicle for virtuosity.

Once upon a time there was a guitarist who played far above our possibilities. A supergifted technician who never made us notice that virtue, but only of his artistic creativity, his ability to move the listener. This was his secret. That he was not a slave to the guitar, not a servant of its demands, but a transmitter of emotion. And the road toward the heart has risks that do not come from the faculties of execution. Because the guitar does not have strings, it has bars. And the Prisoner Number One in the jail of guitar playing was born in Guadalcanal, Cordoba. Once there was a simple crazy man who pressed the tuning pegs of the siguiriyas, playing up the neck in the fourth position without using a capo. Changing the pasa to flamenco without rising from the round yellow table upon which he wrapped up the history of this art.

Once upon a time the inheritor of the throne of guitar, in a shared reign with Rafael Riqueni, seated on a golden chair and embracing the rosewood symbol of the south, which is the cross carried by the martyrs of guitar playing when they want to shout out that those six strigs are the sum total of who we are. Vicente sometimes struck the guitar with too much power, but he was in Seville proclaiming the advent of his monarchy. And in festive full sail he stopped at the Callejón de Agua, again in the soleá. In the key of the mysterious taranta. A sublime madness. Una excelsa barbaridad. One must be very pure to play in this key without it sounding like the flamenco from the eastern mining districts. This was the secret: to create something totally new without it being noticed.

Once upon a time there was a sublime creator who tried to pass through here unperceived. I’m sorry, Amigo, but excess humility is only worthwhile behind the guitar. On the other side, we saw everything. In the Biennal de Sevilla. Dancing in celeric phrasing, encircling the electrical bulerías that El Choro dnced in accents that must be sought two hundred meters deep in the earth, where the soleá apolá as once sung by Camarón sends down its roots, with its echoes of the hollow sound of the great singer Niño Gloria, but above all, of the singer Rafael de Utrera.

Once upon a time there was a man who came to Seville and wrote his name in the register of the unique, ofthe singular. If sometimes I forget myself, go ahead and mock me. I feel I have not been worthy of witnessing the definitive ascension of Vicente Amigo to the Olympus of flamenco. And I swear on my guts that I saw the new Messiah playing with the firmament in his hands. His destination unto death. Al que va a dirigir esta hasta que se muera. A un cristo que busca con la mirada su sitio en cada latigazo. A Christ who seeks with his glance his site in every lash of the whip. El cielo. Heaven itself.

Translator’s note: The original is at:

http://sevilla.abc.es/cultura/sevi-vicente-amigo-mesias-guitarra-201609172228_noticia.html

Holy cow. It’s interesting that this hyperventilated consecration of Vicente Amigo simply confirms what most observers have suspected for at least two decades: That with due respect to the wondrous Tomatito, who took over Paco de Lucía’s role as accompanist-in-chief for the legendary Camarón, and to the amazing Gerardo Nuñez, it was Vicente Amigo — and not someone who arose later among the incredible crop of younger guitarists — who was indeed the Anointed One in terms of the contemporary guitar itself.

(Am I the last player around who still uses the original E A D G B E guitar tuning? And is it my imagination, or is it actually starting to sound novel and exotic?)

BZ

February 15, 2017   No Comments

Flamenco Forms: The Bulerías

No flamenco form is as vital or ubiquitous as the bulerías. Its “inconfundible” — (unmistakable, “unconfoundable”) pulse powers fiestas in most flamenco territory. In Jerez, especially, it is everywhere — the song, the dance, the guitar, the local anthem expressed in endless variations that are normally joyous but can have astonishing emotional reach and power. In my years there, at countless sessions in bars and basements and in that city’s terrific flamenco peñas — associations open to everyone — it was a shared bond between every artist and aficionado.

It’s logical to see the bulerías as simply an outgrowth of the soleá — a sped-up version that still can serve as a windup or remate, often in the same flamenco mode and rhythm and basic melodic structure. Like many typical remates, would have a sort of natural tendency to leave the flamenco mode and go into the major key.

This debt to the soleá doesn’t fit with the idea that the bulerías may have originally been a major-key thing, just another variant in the major-key cantiñas/alegrías family with its folkloric (even jota-inspired) genesis. (This would imply a non-Gypsy origin, in musical terms.)

The big Diccionario del Flamenco reveals that most of the bigshot authorities lean toward the former theory. José Blas Vega calls the bulerías “the daughter of the solea” and links them to the “estribillo” that Loco Mateo used to rematar [wind up] his solea. J.M. Caballero Bonald says they are “direct inheritors of the soleá”, created primarily to accompany dancing. He adds “the gamut of bulerías styles is virtually uncontrollable, although one can distinguish two distinct groups: true “bulerías festeras” or bulerías for dancing, and the “bulerías al golpe”, or bulerías for singing, whose most defined variant is customarily called, with good reason, the bulerias por soleá. The former group is
especially fertile and flexible (? movedizo), allowing a series of improvizations and thematic borrowings even from exotically distant musicalstyles. The latter group, as its name indicates, is clearly derived from the soleá and its clear role as a song that isn’t danced gives it a hierarchical position among the noble forms derived from the primitive songs.”

Pedro Camacho writes: “Rhythmically, the bulería is a “cante bolero”, whose origin is almost certainly the earlier jaleo, or festive song (canción jaleada) that accompanied euphoric dancing. In this sense, it is a “boleria”. When the Gypsies incorporated into this dance the traditional verses of the soleá or soleariya [a term for a soleá using three-line rather than the more common four-line verses], and arbitrarily accommodated these melodies, the “bulería gitana” was born, still sometimes called the jaleo.”

Fernando Quiñones writes of bulerías “A song descended from the soleá … though more lively — there are even some bulerías a golpe, with much more of soleares than of bulerías. The original bulerías might have derived from the old “juguetillos”, and are still sometimes absurdly viewed as throw-away time-killers; but they are much more. The bulerías as a song has real merit.”

José Luís Ortiz Nuevo: “This relatively modern song comes to us from Loco Mateo via El Gloria, a perfect synthesis of deep expression. It is a condensation of the solea, with the essence of its rhythms and the light of its echoes and musical form. It flows from the palmas and the dance like a ceaseless cyclone, a flow of the emotions of the fiesta. Properly heard, it
incites a vertigo of courage and fury. But nowadays, all the “renovations” are carrying it in the opposite direction — stretching its tercios (verses) to excessive lengths, unnecessarily sweetening its laments, carelessly breaking up the precision of its compás. The cuples and coplas (verses based on popular songs rather than flamenco styles) are today disfiguring its true character, with the acquiescence of many aficionados.”

End of citations from the Diccionario.

Again, it’s true that lot of early versions of this relatively recent form (first taking shape in the late 1800′s) are in the major, so maybe the bulerías didn’t come directly from the soleá after all. I prefer to believe it did — it gives a certain borrowed gravitas to the bulerías

Nomenclature note: The soleá is the soleá. The bulerías is (are?) the bulerías. But I’m convinced that there is another form, distinct from either and with a its own tempo and melody (maybe just one single melody, unlike the soleá with dozens or the bulerías with several basic melodies and infinite modifications), and that it is most properly called either the bulerías por soleá, or the soleá por bulerías, or the bulerías al golpe or the bulerías pa’ escuchar (the bulerías to sit down, shut up and listen to.)

Is it all perfectly clear?

Well, maybe this will help. The bulerías is characterized by its unique rhythmic pattern or compás. Like the soleá, it can be heard as having accents on the third, sixth, tenth and twelfth beats; like nothing else, it can be heard (and clapped to) with beats on the first and second, fourth and fifth, seventh and eighth, and tenth and eleventh beats; it is often clapped with beats on one two three, seven eight, ten. Oh, and there’s often an underlying emphasis on every other beat: two, four, six, eight, ten and twelve.

Happy to have cleared that up for you.

Brook Zern

P.S. An artist friend of my father, who also played flamenco, asked me to come to his class on abstract art at Cooper Union in New York and bring my guitar. I did, and he asked me to play some bulerías, which I also did. He asked the class what they thought of this musical interlude and they said, basically, “It was so free, so wild, so impulsive.”

He then turned to me and asked what I was doing, and I started to explain and diagram all those strict and inviolable rules, the underpinning that made it really work.

When they got bored and restless, he turned to them and said: “Why am I telling you about this? Because a lot of you think you can become abstract impressionists without ever learning how to draw.”

Well, I thought that was pretty illuminating — only a firm underlying structure, a basic knowledge, can provide the true freedom required to improvise and to express your vision.

In fact, I wrote that little story in this blog several years ago, confident that it would be as thoroughly unread as nearly everything else in these virtual pages. Imagine my surprise and, yes, delight, when I read the headline of an interview with perhaps the greatest and free-est tradition-minded flamenco dancer, Farruquito. “You have to learn to draw before you can become an abstract expressionist, he said.

That interview is somewhere in this blog, and I can’t help thinking that maybe somebody mentioned it to him. Okay, I flatter myself — what else is new, you say.

BZ

February 5, 2017   No Comments

Heraldry 101: The Cross of Queen Isabella – the inside story

Recent entries in this blog have focused on the great flamenco singer Manolo Caracol. An entry in another blog, David Pérez Merinero’s excellent “Papeles Flamencos” from January 24th, 2017, reveals that in 1969 Caracol received a notable honor, the Order of Isabel la Católica. It was granted by the Chief of State, who at that time was the Fascist dictator Francisco Franco.

Specifically, Caracol received the “Cruz de Caballero de la Orden de Isabel la Católica” and the blog entry goes on to say it is “within the the Royal Order of Isabel la Catolica a distinction of minor categoría (the recipients’ names are not even published in the BOE). (The blog adds “If, improbably, some reader of these pages wishes to acquire a similar decoration, they’re available on ebay for 200 euros.)”

Okay, I think Cruz de Caballero may translate as “Knight’s Cross”. In 2008, I received the Cruz de Oficial, which translates as “Officer’s Cross” — the third of six categories, and one step higher than the Knight’s Cross.

(Here’s the drill: Beyond category is the King of Spain, who is the Grand Master of the Order — that was Juan Carlos I in 2008, and is now his son Felipe V. Next up is the Minister of Foreign Affairs, who is the Grand Chancellor of the Order. Then we get to the First Class recipients, who are Knights of the Collar (Caballeros del Collar) — limited to just 25 people at any one time; and the Knight Grand Cross people, or Caballeros Gran Cruz; limited to 500 people at any time. Lowering ourselves to the two categories of Second Class members of the Order — first there are the Commanders by Number or Encomienda de Numero, limited to 800 lucky winners, and then the mere Commanders or Encomiendas, with no fixed limit.

Well, you can’t win ‘em all. Next is the Third Class of the awards, specifically the Officer’s Cross or Cruz de Oficial that I received. Fourth Class is the Knight’s Cross or Cruz de Caballeros. Both of these categories “enjoy personal nobility and have the privilege of adding a golden heraldic mantle to their coat of arms.” (Great. Now, where can I buy a coat of arms? For that matter, how do I start enjoying personal nobility?)

Bringing up the rear are the Fifth Class holders of the Silver Cross (Cruz de Plata) and the Sixth Class folks, who hold either the Silver Medal (Medalla de Plata) or the Bronze Medal (Medalla de Bronce). (There used to ba a Gold Medal but it was abolished long ago.)

Mine came with the requisite fancy scroll signed by then King Juan Carlos I, which is better than Francisco Franco any day. On the front it bears the legend “Lealtad Acrisolada” which means “Proven Loyalty”.

On the royal website, https://casarealdeespana.es/2016/02/08/orden-de-isabel-la-catolica/ I see the Cruz de Oficial but not the Cruz de Caballero, which might’ve been dropped or superseded.

Anyway, I was told that I should be referred to as “Ilustrísimo”, which seems to mean “very illustrious” or possibly “fully illustrated”. So far, this has not happened.

My official English-language notification said I’d been knighted by King Juan Carlos, which I happily take at face value, since an Officer is considered a Knight, but of even higher stature.

I sure hope my name appears in the BOE, whatever that is, but have my doubts.

(I got the thing for increasing American understanding and appreciation of Spanish culture – in my case, through the prism of flamenco. Seventy years ago, when I was five, my Pennsylvania Dutch and Communist father took up flamenco guitar and inflicted his practicing on me night after sleepless night until I went off to college. Sadly, I had become habituated to the racket and have been inflicting it upon myself and everyone in my vicinity for the fifty years since. I’ve spent years learning about flamenco in Spain, and talking and writing about it here in the U.S., to no apparent avail until I was notified about the Cruz – which I assumed was a very elaborate and inventive hoax until I had eliminated all the usual suspects.)

You assume I am delusional, in the grand tradition of other quixotic obsessive wannabes? Okay, check this out: http://www.flamencoexperience.com/

Better known and/or more deserving recipients include: Samuel F.B. Morse, of code fame, in 1859; Lord Mountbatten, Prince Charles’s late uncle; La Argentinita, the great Argentinian dancer (see the remarkable story of this elsewhere in this blog); Imelda Marcos and Saddam Hussein in 1974 (a vintage year for dictators); Alicia Alonso, the great Cuban ballet dancer in 1993; Celin, Pepe and Angel Romero, the “Royal family of the Spanish Guitar” in 2000; Fernando Botero, the Colombian artist; Mexican President Felipe Calderón; Jorge Drexler, the Uruguayan singer-songwriter in 2010; Montserrat Caballé; Plácido Domingo, and scores of others.

Brook Zern

February 5, 2017   No Comments

From 1850 — The First Accurate Description of Early Flamenco Singing by Gevaert – translated with comments by Brook Zern

Long ago, I posted something from a Spanish magazine, a report on flamenco in 1850 as written by Gevaert, a noted Belgian musicologist of that era. Here’s a brief excerpt, starting with the words of the modern-day author Arie Sneeuw and then quoting Gevaert:

“Finally, we have the brief description, already referred to the repertoire in totality, of the use of the voice and the tesitura characteristic of cante flamenco:

‘What also testifies to the Arab origin of these cantos is the guttural and cut-off, interrupted (entrecortada) way of singing — a way that seems to be compulsory (de rigor) for all of them. All of this music is sung in the highest registers of the voice, and it is not uncommon to hear the entrada (entrance passage) of a cana or of a fandango done with a C-note from the chest (realizada con un do de pecho).’

(Sneeuw then says): “Since starting a phrase with a C from the chest is probably the most difficult way of doing any type of singing, this passage, together with the one above which refers to breathing, gives us an idea of the demands that were placed on singers in those days — or that they imposed upon themselves, since one would customarily implicate the other.

On the other hand, the somewhat forced tesitura which the cante demanded — and which to a greater or lesser degree it still demands today — seems to be a natural corollary of the descending melodic line, as commented on earlier.”

End of excerpt. Again, it seems that a high voice has been part of flamenco, certainly of professional flamenco, for a long time. I’ve gotten a vague impression that the impetus for this might be related to Italian operatic style, though of course there is no other Italianate influence in flamenco song (I hope.)

Brook Zern

January 29, 2017   No Comments

Flamenco Forms – The Rondeña – From José Manuel Gamboa’s book “Una Historia del Flamenco” – translated with comments by Brook Zern

The Rondeña: Flamenco Authority J.M. Gamboa’s take on the rondeña

The rondeña is a remarkable and haunting piece from the flamenco guitar repertoire, the only flamenco guitar piece without an associated song — though there is a sung rondeña that can be accompanied on guitar. Here’s a description of the rondeña from the excellent book “Una Historia del Flamenco” by José Manuel Gamboa:

“We know the rondeña of [the noted Spanish classical guitarist Julian] Arcas. We know that [the great classical guitarist] Francisco Tarrega, his disciple, interpreted works of the master, and that Miguel Borrull Sr. [a famed early flamenco guitarist] was an indirect student of Tarrega. It is only logical to suppose that it was Borrull who brought the rondeña to Madrid, home of the young Ramón Montoya [considered the father of the developed flamenco guitar, and often called the creator of the solo guitar version of the rondeña].

This was confirmed by [the important flamenco singer] Pepe de la Matrona who said, “The first person to play the rondeña was Borrull Sr. This refers to the guitar solo, with its distinctive altered tuning, that Montoya improved and and introduced to a wide audience, since Borrull’s flamenco activity was limited to the usual resources of the instrument, namely strumming [rasgueado] and plucking with the thumb [pulgar]. The rondeña used a lot of that. Moreover, in Borrull’s era no guitarist had decided to record concert pieces of this nature. That’s how Borrull’s rondeña passed into history through the hands of Ramón Montoya. In any case, we still don’t know who wrote down the scordatura applied to that concert version of the rondeña, since we don’t find it among the works published by the maestros cultos [the cultured masters of the classical instrument]. Was it a Borrull’s concept? What we do find, already in Arcas’s written works, is the concept. It’s reasonable to suppose that Tarrega and others had the word…not to mention Rafael Marín [another noted transcriber of early flamenco guitar pieces]. That talented individual writes – and publishes as early as 1902! – flamenco works of enormous complexity for the time, where all kinds of techniques are used, the full range of the guitar fingerboard is employed, and there aare even scordaturas, as the were called.

What is clear is that Ramón Montoya – and through him other great players like Niño Ricardo, Sabicas, Paco de Lucía, Manolo Sanlúcar and Victor Monge “Serranito” – are the inheritors of Julián Arcas and Francisco Tarrega, each adding to the collective wisdom found in the piece. And there you have it, in its significant sense.

If we have traido a colación the concert version of the rondeña – the sung version is one of the oldest known forms in the flamenco genre – the dates don’t correspond because the instrumental version has the characteristics of the version of the fandango sung in the Eastern regions of Spain which gave birth to the form called the tarantos. Let’s look at the relationship.

Ramón Montoya “sings” with his guitar – he plays a melody that, not long afterwards, the [legendary dancer] Carmen Amaya would sing in her productions and would record with the nephew of Ramon, [the great virtuoso] Sabicas [not actually a nephew of Ramón Montoya – that position was occupied by Carlos Montoya, who became the most famous flamenco concert guitarist]. Carmen recorded it with two verses, “Dame veneno” and “Abre, que soy el Moreno”. At the end, she bursts into her energetic footwork. Sabicas accompanies her in the key used for mineras. And it’s titled rondeñas. The comediógrafo [what’s that?] Alfredo Mañas, believing that this was just a labeling error and it should have been titled tarantos [a term that would subsequently be used for a rhythmic, danceable version of the free-rhythm tarantas], told Carmen as much. She answered tajante that there was absolutely no mistake, ant that this was indeed the rondeña, now and forever [de toda la vida – all her life].”

End of section. Thanks to José Manuel Gamboa for this insight, for his book, and for the hours we have spent in conversation at El Colmao in Jerez.

At a recent New York conference dedicated to the many forms of the fandango — the rondeña is one such form, as are the granainas, the malagueñas, the tarantas, the mineras and several other song and guitar styles — I attended one session which presented a very early version of the rondeña as it was played before 1850 by the Granada guitarist Francisco Murciano and transcribed by the noted Russian composer Glinka. It was fascinating, and to my surprise it sounded a lot like one of the fandango forms as played on guitar decades later.

A lot of today’s experts insist there was no such thing as flamenco — not guitar, not dance and not flamenco song — until after 1850 when flamenco burst upon the scene in some Andalusian cities and also in Madrid.

I can’t understand why, if the guitar music of the flamenco form called the rondeña existed before 1850, today’s authorities insist flamenco didn’t exist until after 1850.

(I believe in the comical theory that flamenco had a gestation period, and that some of the songs that were until recently attributed in large measure to the Gypsies of Spain were being developed and performed below the radar for decades. This is called the “hermetic period”, and is ridiculed in decent company. (Maybe it’s because the “proof” is that there are no records and thus no proof that there was such a period. On the other hand, if there were such proof, it wouldn’t have been a hermetic period, right?)
Brook Zern

January 28, 2017   No Comments

Flamenco Singer Manolo Caracol’s Great Recording “Una Historia del Flamenco” – contents and comment

Twenty years ago, I wrote the following post to a flamenco mailing list. i’m adding it here because the recording is a topic of a recent blog entry on the singer Manolo Caracol.

Subj: Re: Anthology(ies) – Caracol/Melchor
To: flamenco@vm.temple.edu

Ken Parker notes his preference for Manolo Caracol’s 2-LP or 1-CD anthology called “Una Historia del Flamenco” where Caracol is accompanied by Melchor de Marchena.

Since Ken appreciates Melchor’s great toque, notably por siguiriyas, it’s worth noting that before “Una Historia del Flamenco” came out on the Clave label, it was issued stateside on two labels, Washington and Top Rank International (Top Rank had a fuzzy red velveteen jacket). But those early versions included two guitar solos by Melchor — a siguiriya, and a solea. And while Melchor is, as Jacinto notes, probably the exact opposite of a soloist (despite several solo LP’s he recorded), his playing on these “Historia” solos seems pretty impressive.

I am always in awe of Manolo Caracol’s genius. A number of singers can be gripping if you’re attuned to flamenco and looking for that quality. But I think that only Manolo Caracol and Agujetas are obviously electrifying in a palpable way, even when they aren’t at the peak moments of their performances. (This is rarefied company. Terremoto and Chocolate can be equally great, and La Niña de los Peines can overshadow them all if you count vocal chops as part of the equation. But for drop-dead power, the scary kind that made Manuel Torre the greatest Gypsy singer ever, I think Caracol’s best recordings would be a good place to start.)

Here’s the listing for the Historia.

[faf]√ MANOLO CARACOL: UNA HISTORIA DEL CANTE FLAMENCO [HISTORY OF CANTE FLAMENCO]

2 Discos: Hisp HH 10-23, Hisp HH 10-24 [Precio: 710 pts.] 1958
Clave 18.1077, Clave 18.1078 1968
Hisp 0-034
√Vega VAL 19 Hispavox France
CD: Hisp 781362-2

HISTORY OF CANTE FLAMENCO

Washington 713 714 USA
[gs]√Top Rank International RDM 1 USA

Cante: Manolo Caracol
Guitarra: Melchor de Marchena

I. Martinete “En el calabozo”; Martinete “Mis ducas no eran na”; Siguiriyas “El reniego”; Siguiryas de “El Marruro” “Mujer malina”; Siguiriyas (solo de guitarra: M. de M); Siguiriyas de Manuel Torres “De Santiago y Santa Ana”; Siguiriyas;/ Caña “Me pueden mandar”; Solea de Joaquin el de la Paula “Si yo pudiera”; Solea de Enrique el Mellizo “Tiro piedras a la calle”; Solea (solo de guitarra: M. de M.); Solea de Antonio Frijones “Al senor del baratillo”; Malagueña de Enrique El Mellizo “Soy como aquel jilguerillo”; Malagueña de Chacon “Que del nio la cogi”

II. Fandangos “Se la llevo dios”; Fandangos Caracoleras “Viva Madrid”; Fandangos de Huelva.; Taranta y Malagueña “Veneno dejaste”; Tientos “Antes de llegar a tu puerta”; Tientos Caracoleros”Cuando te vayas conmigo”;/ Saeta “Toitas las mares”; Mirabras “Debajito del puente”; Alegrías “La barca de mis amores”; Bulerías “Voz del pueblo”; Bulerías “a gorpe” [a golpe] “No quiero na contigo”; Bulerías Festeras “No quiero caudales”

As good as it gets.

Brook Zern

January 28, 2017   No Comments